Multicast and Scalable Networks

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Multicast and Scalable Networks

  1. 1. Multicast and Scalable Networks - Broadcast & Multicast Cluster 23.sept 2005 Harald Loktu, Telenor R&D
  2. 2. OUTLINE 1. Broadband Deployment i Europe 2. Major Trends in Service Evolution 3. Evolution in Video Coding 4. Multicast Applied to IP-TV 5. Scenarios in Service Provisioning 6. Conclusion -2-
  3. 3. BB Deployment in Europe Cable modem Greece 0% . Ireland 4% 9% 71 % DSL SOME OBSERVATIONS: 20 % Norw ay 82 % On average 88% may have BB 0% Italy 85 % coverage by DSL Austria 31 % 86 % Spain 42 % Large countries like Germany, 87 % Average 29 % 88 % UK, France are above 90% 10 % Germany 91 % Most countries will expand DSL 26 % France 91 % coverage to min 90-95% Portugal 61 % 92 % Iceland 31 % Generally capacity available will 92 % Finland 32 % 92 % increase not only in UK 50 % 95 % urban/suburban areas 45 % Sw eden 96 % DSL will migrate to ADSL 2+ Netherlands 82 % 34 % 100 % and VDSL 2 technology well Luxembourg 100 % Denmark 60 % beyond 50 % coverage 100 % Belgium 80 % 100 % 0% 20 % 40 % 60 % 80 % 100 % National Coverage Dec 2004: Source IDATE -3-
  4. 4. Major Trends in Service Evolution Introduction of 3-play (*) – One of the most important drivers for increased access capacity – IP-TV with Standard Definition TV (576x720i) on MPEG-2 – Will be accelerated by analogue shut-down throughout Europe Introduction of HDTV is gaining momentum – HD-enabled Flat Panel TVs are becoming affordable – Next generation game consoles (ps3 & xbox360) support HD – High Definition DVD will be launched 2006-2007 – Europe will introduce (720x1280p)-format Multiple Screens and number of terminals – More TVs move into peoples homes (bedroom, kitchen etc) – TV-programming is moving to PD, PDA and mobile devices (*): (VoIP, Internett access, IP-TV) -4-
  5. 5. Evolution in Video Coding (1) - MPG-2 vs MPG-4 compression MPG-2 HDTV Screen Resolution Optimistic MPG-4 (i) Forecast MPG-4 (ii) MPG-2 SDTV MPG-4 (i) (i): 2005/6 MPG-4 (ii) (ii): 2007-2010 0 5 10 15 20 Required Service Capacity [Mbps] -5-
  6. 6. Evolution in Video Coding (2) - Deployment issues Introduction of IP-TV in the European market – 3-5 Mb/s average MPEG-2 rate for SDTV – 50-100 channels with TV programing offered – Full service offering distribution occupy (0.15-0.5) Gbps – Most often single service provider Future issus – Migration to MPEG-4 and HDTV start in the timeframe 2005-2010 – European more often have 2 or more TV sets in the home – Video will be streamed other devices as well, so multi-resolution must be handled – Open service provisioning will be pursued allowing for more than 1 service provider -6-
  7. 7. Evolution in Video Coding (3) - Migration from SDTV to HDTV Reduced Total TV channel capacity HDTV service Full HDTV service HDTV MPG-4 SDTV HDTV MPG-4 MPG-4 HDTV SDTV SDTV MPG-4 MPG-2 MPG-2 SDTV MPG-4 MPG2-to-MPG4 Migration Timeline -7-
  8. 8. Multicast Applied to IP-TV (2) - Solution 1: Static Multicast TV/ PE iTV server ITV server STB Core.net Brut .Netw xTU-R DSLAM ”ERX” PE ISP/ Internet Internett PC F G PE CA TV HE Content on on B.band -8-
  9. 9. Multicast Applied to IP-TV (3) - Solution 2: Dynamic Multicast TV/ PE iTV server ITV server STB Core.net Brut .Netw xTU-R DSLAM ”ERX” PE ISP/ Internet Internett PC F G PE CA TV HE Content on on B.band -9-
  10. 10. Multicast Applied to IP-TV(4) - Telenor IP-TV DSL trial short-term stats (*) Aggregate Capacity with MC of TV channels 90 80 70 # active TV channels 60 50 Serie1 App. Constant 40 Semin-linear 30 Transition 20 10 0 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 10000 # active TV sessions (*):Empirical data up to 600 customers -10-
  11. 11. Multicast Applied to IP-TV(5) Usage – (40-65) % below 500 active TV-sessions/channels – (65-85)% between 500 and 3000 active TV-sessions/channels Assumptions – Only empirical data up to 600 customers – Average values presented Conclusions – For access points like Radio Base Stations and DSLAMs, aggregating up to 2000-3000 customers, static allocation of multi-cast gives a vaste of capacity -11-
  12. 12. Scenario 1: TV over IP – Single SP Content Content Integrator Distributor Canal Customer Digital Content Distribution - to SP Incumbant Head End Characteristics – Content only flows as a single copy through the system – One way of formatting content in terms of compression, security, encapsulation – Customers can only choose one service provider Deployment – This scenario is used by most telcos/incumbents entering the IP-TV market with DSL -12-
  13. 13. Scenario 2: IP-TV Multiple SPs Content Content Integrators Canal Distributer Customer Digital Content - Incumbant Distribution Viasat Incumbant Head End Cusomter - xSP1 xSP1 Bredbånds Head End Customer aliansen - xSP2 xSP2 Head End Characteristics – Content only flows as a multiple copies through the system – Several ways of formatting content in terms of compression, security, encapsulation – Customers may choose among several service provider Deployment – This scenario may be used by power utilities for entering the IP-TV market with FFTH -13-
  14. 14. Scenario1 + Dynamic Multicast - Based on short-term stats Total TV channel capacity Scenario 2: Multiple SPs HDTV will increase MPG-4 max level SDTV HDTV MPG-4 MPG-4 (0.15-0.5) Gbps HDTV SDTV SDTV MPG-4 MPG-2 MPG-2 SDTV MPG-4 3000 TVs MPG2-to-MPG4 Migration Timeline -14-
  15. 15. Conclusions Network Scalability – Dynamic Multicast has to be employed to achieve optimum capacity utilisation – Especially, access aggregation targetting below 2000-3000 customers will highly benefit from dynamic multicast Service Provisioning – Migration to HDTV (and MPEG-4 format) will boost the capacity demand at least in an interim period due to parallell transmission – Open service provision will allow for multiple service provider, which most likely increase the capacity demand further -15-

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