Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Kwl

KWL Slide show

  • Be the first to comment

Kwl

  1. 1. Teaching Strategy: KWL: Know, Want to know, Learned
  2. 2. Introduction Know, Want to know, Learned (KWL) is an instructional reading strategy that is used to guide students through a text. *First, brainstorm about the topic (Know). Next, generate a list of questions about what they Want to Know. Third, they record what they Learned from reading the text. *Source: National Education Association (http://www.nea.org/tools/k-w-l-know-want-to-know-learned.html)
  3. 3. Purpose of KWL Sample of KWL Graphic Organizer • Elicits students’ prior knowledge of the topic of the text. • Sets a purpose for reading. • Helps students to monitor their comprehension. *This method works best with expository texts. Suggest creating a KWL Graphic Organizer on the class blackboard (or whiteboard), plus have hardcopy versions for each student. 1. Under “K” column, have the students state terms, words, phrases they already assocate with the topic. 2. Under the “W” column, record questions about the topic. Rephrase statements into questions. 3. Under the “L” column, record answers to the questions from the text. Additional text may be needed if particular questions are not answered in the student’s textbook.
  4. 4. Sample of KWL in the classroom Example: Gravity *Source: National Education Association (http://www.nea.org/tools/k-w-l-know-want-to-know-learned.html)
  5. 5. Video explanation of KWL Graphic Organizer in action: *Source: Study.com (http://study.com/academy/lesson/kwl-chart-example-graphic-organizer-and-classroom-applications.html)
  6. 6. *Pros and Cons of KWL K-W-L charts are overused when other graphic organizers would be more effective. Teachers should introduce students to a variety of graphic organizers and encourage them to be selective in the ones they choose to use for different purposes. Brain research cautions teachers about class discussions focused on what students “Know.” If students think they know something and share it, sometimes other students remember the incorrect information from the initial discussion. K-W-L charts can be effective, but teachers should consider some of the disadvantages before choosing to use them. *Source: University of Kansas (www.specialconnections.ku.edu/~specconn/guides/OldSnake.pdf)

×