Gr 6 lesson 2 visual art

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Gr 6 lesson 2 visual art

  1. 1. Lesson Title: “Ancient Aztec Images through Writing and Printmaking” How the Aztec Civilization was transformed by the arrival of Cortes.6th Grade ELA Theme 4, Visual Art , Assessment 2Essential Question: How did the arrival of Cortes change the Aztec civilization? What elements of art can be identified in Aztec Art and Artifacts and the art of Mexican Muralist, Diego Rivera? What is the meaning of the symbols used by the Aztecs? How can we make a print of an ancient Aztec symbol and what does it mean?Integrated Learning Objective:By the end of this lesson students will be able to write a journal entry from the point of view of a person who lived in ancient Mexico, developing the topic with supporting details and precise verbs, nouns and adjectives to paint a visual image in the mind of the reader. Students will be able to identify and describe all of the elements of art and discuss theme, genre, style and idea in ancient Aztec art and artifacts and in the work of Diego Rivera. Students will be able to express themselves creatively by designing a Styrofoam print using an ancient Aztec symbol of their own choice.Reading/Language Arts Visual ArtStandard(s)1.2b Writing StrategiesDevelop the topic with supporting details and precise verbs, nouns, and adjectives to paint a visual image in the mind of the reader.Artistic PerceptionDevelop Visual Arts Knowledge and VocabularyIdentify and describe all the elements of art found in selected works of art (color, shape/form, line, texture, space and value.Discuss works of art as to theme, genre, style, idea, and differences in media.Derive Meaning4.1 Construct and describe plausible interpretations of what they perceive in works of art.2.4 Create increasingly complex original works of art reflecting personal choices and increased technical skills. ResourcesHoughton Mifflin 6th Grade ReaderWriting Activities pg. R27List of Elements of Art and Principles of designs with definitions and examples.Websites with images of Aztec symbolsMarcels-kid-crafts.com (free Aztec symbol collectionhandsonarts.blogspot.comPrint of Diego Rivera mural, “The Totonac Civilization,” 1942.Aztec Symbols Background Knowledgeaztec-history.net/aztec_symbols Video: “Visual Thinking Strategies” recommended by Kim Morin, CSUF, as a good tool for learning to talk about art descriptively.Student Performance or ArtworkStudents will select an ancient Aztec symbol and draw, then emboss it onto a Styrofoam plate with a pencil. The plate will then be rolled with water-based ink and printed onto heavy paper. The student will write the meaning of the symbol neatly under the print.AssessmentHow will teachers and students know that they have met the full rigor of the standard?I will know the students have met the objectives when they have turned in a journal entry from the point of view of someone who saw the arrival of Cortes in Mexico City and used supporting details and precise verbs, nouns, and adjectives to paint a visual image in the mind of the reader.I will know the students have met the objectives when they are able to identify and describe all of the elements of art found in the photos of ancient Aztec art and artifacts and discuss the theme, genre, style, idea and differences in media. The students will then construct and perceive plausible interpretations of what they perceive in a print of a Diego Rivera mural. MaterialsReaderJournalpencilPrints and images of Ancient Aztec Art and ArtifactsDiego Rivera print of mural, “Scholastic Art, Mexican Muralists, working with Narrative Art,”March 2008Photocopies of Aztec symbols sized to fit onto Styrofoam plates circular or rectangular (enough for students to have several to choose from.)Styrofoam plates- 1 for each student (with extras)Water-based ink in several colors (can be ordered from Nasco) Construction paper- many colors. Light inks show up on dark paper and dark inks on light paper. PencilsPlexiglass inking plates (scraps of plexiglass can be purchased at Precision Plastics) -one for each color Brayers- ink rollers- one for each colorPhysical Space Requirements andGrouping(s)Students sit as assigned by teacherFor the Aesthetics lesson students will sit in seats to look at and discuss Art prints.For printmaking it is a good idea to set up an inking table and students can take turns making prints until they all have had a chance to make at least 3 successful copies of their chosen Aztec symbol.<br />Vocabulary<br />Interpreting a work of Art<br />The Elements of Art- the building blocks of art<br />Line- A point moving in space. It can vary in width, length, curvature, color, or direction. <br />Shape- A two-dimensional area or plane that may be open or closed, free form or geometric, found in nature or made by humans. <br />Form- A three-dimensional volume or the illusion of three dimensions (related to shape, which is two-dimensional); the particular characteristics of the visual elements of a work of art (as distinguished from its subject matter or content). <br />Value- Lightness or darkness of a hue or neutral color; the gradations of light and dark in a two-dimensional artwork and on the surface of three-dimensional objects.<br />Color- The visual connections depending on the reflection or absorption of light from a given surface. The three characteristics of color are hue, value and intensity. <br />Texture- The surface quality of materials, either actual (tactile) or implied (visual). <br />Space- The emptiness or area between, around, above, below, or within objects. Shapes and forms are defined by the space around and within them. <br />Theme- An idea based on a particular subject.<br />Genre- The representation of people, subjects, and scenes from everyday life.<br />Style- A set of characteristics of the art of a culture, period, or school of art; the characteristic expression of a particular artist.<br />Media- The materials used by an artist to create a work of art.<br />Aztec Symbols<br />Most of us know only a little about the Aztec symbols that were used in the empire centuries ago. <br />Symbolism was a part of everyday life for the people of central Mexico. Symbols were used in writing, in keeping time and dates, in names and titles, on buildings and in artwork- even in clothing. It identified and explained the gods, showed social level, and foretold good and bad fortune. In keeping with the culture of the Aztecs, much of the symbolism was focused around religion and war. Symbols involved both realistic human forms as well as forms of nature. Jaguars, snakes, dogs, birds and even insects were common. Combined with other symbols a rich story could be told.<br />(see websites listed above for more information)<br />Styrofoam Printing Lesson<br />Students will write the journal entry from the point of a person who lived in ancient Mexico and saw the arrival of Cortes. They may wish to include descriptions of some the images, symbols, art or artifacts we viewed and discussed as a class. <br />Students will select an image (Aztec symbol) to use for their Styrofoam print. Size images on the copy machine to fit in a 4”x6” format. Have as many images as possible so that the students can make a choice. Display a chart, provide a handout or websites where students can look up the meaning of the symbols. <br />The image will need to be reversed on the Styrofoam or else it will print backwards so students will need to trace the image onto newsprint or other thin tracing paper. They will then flip it over and draw over the lines that show through so the image will be reversed (backwards). Note: when it is printed it will be forwards (read the correct way).<br />Cut out the Styrofoam so that it has no rim and is perfectly flat. Using a ruler or circle template, cut out an even print block. The edges need to be nice and even because the entire surface will be inked. The image must fit into the surface area of the piece of Styrofoam. If larger pieces are needed meat, vegetable or takeout-box Styrofoam trays may be used (as long as they are washed very well). <br />Place the newsprint with the traced image onto flat Styrofoam “print block” and using a ball point pen or pencil go over the lines, pressing lightly into the Styrofoam. Remove the tracing paper and go over the lines to make sure they are deep (but do not go all the way through the Styrofoam).<br />Choose paper and inks that you would like to use for your final print. Lighter inks work well (provide nice contrast) on dark paper and dark inks look good on lighter paper. Some of the lighter inks (like yellow) are rather transparent and you may want to add a little white to the plate.<br />Using a plastic spoon or knife spread or scoop a small amount of ink onto the plexiglass plate. Note: if you use too much in on the plate it will fill up the lines and will not print a nice clean image. <br />Use the brayer (small roller) to roll the ink evenly on the plexiglass, then roll the brayer onto your Styrofoam plate. It is good to have stacks of newspapers under the Styrofoam so that the student can change the newspaper for the next student or for their next print.<br />Before the ink dries stamp it onto the contruction paper that will be your final print. Place it on the paper so that it is centered with enough room to write neatly (after it has dried) the meaning of the symbol.<br />Images can be displayed around the room.<br />Note: Google Styrofoam printing and you will find many instructions and ideas for printing in the classroom.<br />Reading/Language ArtsTheatre Arts or Visual ArtsDay OneINTRODUCEDescription of Practice (ELA)Description of Practice (VAPA)Create Context Teach the meaning of the objectivePrior Knowledge VocabularyCFU<br />TEACHTeacher Modeling Engage StudentsWarm ups that connect prior knowledge and skills and front load new knowledge and skills.CFU<br />PRACTICEGuided PracticeAesthetic exploration of new arts skills and knowledge with ELA skills and knowledge.CFUIndependent PracticeCreate artwork or performance that demonstrates understanding of ELA and Theatre or Visual Art knowledge and skills.<br />APPLYAssess Student PerformanceDid students meet their integrated performance objective?How do the teacher and students know?Close Restate objectives. Make connections. Student ReflectionHOMEWORKIndependentPractice<br />Reading/Language ArtsTheatre Arts or Visual ArtsDay TwoINTRODUCEDescription of Practice (ELA)Description of Practice (VAPA)Create Context Teach the meaning of the objectivePrior Knowledge VocabularyCFU<br />TEACHTeacher Modeling Engage StudentsWarm ups that connect prior knowledge and skills and front load new knowledge and skills.CFU<br />PRACTICEGuided PracticeAesthetic exploration of new arts skills and knowledge with ELA skills and knowledge.CFUIndependent PracticeCreate artwork or performance that demonstrates understanding of ELA and Theatre or Visual Art knowledge and skills.<br />APPLYAssess Student PerformanceDid students meet their integrated performance objective?How do the teacher and students know?Close Restate objectives. Make connections. Student ReflectionHOMEWORKIndependentPractice<br />Reading/Language ArtsTheatre Arts or Visual ArtsDay ThreeINTRODUCEDescription of Practice (ELA)Description of Practice (VAPA)Create Context Teach the meaning of the objectivePrior Knowledge VocabularyCFU<br />TEACHTeacher Modeling Engage StudentsWarm ups that connect prior knowledge and skills and front load new knowledge and skills.CFU<br />PRACTICEGuided PracticeAesthetic exploration of new arts skills and knowledge with ELA skills and knowledge.CFUIndependent PracticeCreate artwork or performance that demonstrates understanding of ELA and Theatre or Visual Art knowledge and skills.<br />APPLYAssess Student PerformanceDid students meet their integrated performance objective?How do the teacher and students know?Close Restate objectives. Make connections. Student ReflectionHOMEWORKIndependentPractice<br />Reading/Language ArtsTheatre Arts or Visual ArtsDay FourINTRODUCEDescription of Practice (ELA)Description of Practice (VAPA)Create Context Teach the meaning of the objectivePrior Knowledge VocabularyCFU<br />TEACHTeacher Modeling Engage StudentsWarm ups that connect prior knowledge and skills and front load new knowledge and skills.CFU<br />PRACTICEGuided PracticeAesthetic exploration of new arts skills and knowledge with ELA skills and knowledge.CFUIndependent PracticeCreate artwork or performance that demonstrates understanding of ELA and Theatre or Visual Art knowledge and skills.<br />APPLYAssess Student PerformanceDid students meet their integrated performance objective?How do the teacher and students know?Close Restate objectives. Make connections. Student ReflectionHOMEWORKIndependentPractice<br />DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTIONESL LDGATE Connections to other subjects <br />

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