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Rob Sippel
Geospatial & Numeric Data Librarian
Liaison to the Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences
Please copy down this link
http://libguides.lib.fit.edu/OCN-ENS3911
(It contains all the information you need to complete ...
You have the following tasks:
Find a peer-reviewed
article (your “primary
article”) from a journal
in your field.
In the b...
Task No. 1
Find a peer-reviewed article (your “primary article”) from a journal in your field.
Find a peer-reviewed
articl...
Some preliminary questions
1. What is a peer-reviewed article?
2. How do I know if an article is peer
reviewed?
What is a peer-reviewed
article?
Scholarly/peer-reviewed/refereed papers
are reviewed by experts (peers) in very
specific ...
How do I know an article is peer-
reviewed?
(continued)
Therefore:
1. Check to see if the journal in which the
article was...
Does the journal use peer-
review?
Check Ulrichsweb
Search for the
journal name
(e.g. Nature or
Science)
Look for a refere...
What are the characteristics of
a peer-reviewed article?
 If your article was published in a journal that uses peer-revie...
Peer-reviewed article: The Title
Title:
may summarize the
articles contents, and
will usually contain
technical terms that...
Peer-reviewed article: The Title
Example of an article title from a
publication that does not use
peer-review
Article titl...
Peer-reviewed article: The
Authors
Authors:
List of authors will also
include their
credentials (helps
establish their
aut...
Peer-reviewed article:
Submission and Publication
Dates
Submission & Publication
Dates:
Provide a history of when the pape...
Peer-reviewed article: The
Publication
Publication: Provides the title of the journal in which the article was
published, ...
Peer-reviewed article: The
Abstract
Abstract:
Briefly summarizes the
contents of the article
(useful for quickly establish...
Peer-reviewed article: The
Introduction
Introduction:
Addresses the topic or
problem being addressed by
the research, as w...
Peer-reviewed article: Charts,
Graphs, and Equations related to
data
Charts, Graphs
and Equations:
Relate to the data
coll...
Peer-reviewed article: The Text
Article Text:
In addition to the
Introduction, sections
may include a
Literature Review,
A...
Peer-reviewed article: The
Conclusion
Conclusion:
Summarizes the
results of the research
Peer-reviewed article: The
References
References:
Lists each of the
articles cited by the
author(s).
How do I find my primary
article?
 Use one of the library’s research databases.
 Research databases allow you to simulta...
Selecting a Research
Database
1. Go to the library homepage:
lib.fit.edu
2. On the left-hand side, click on the
“Research ...
Select a Database from the list of Key Databases.
Searching for Primary
Article
If you see an option for limiting results to peer-reviewed content, select it.
Select
“Advan...
Searching for Primary
Article
Look for option to limit search
to peer-reviewed content.
Enter a topic of interest.
Look fo...
Searching for Primary
Article
Results!
Click on titles for more
details.
Getting a copy of your primary
article.
Two possibilities: either
1. You have immediate
access to a PDF,
or
2. You need to...
Using 360 Link
Two possibilities: either
1. We have it 2. We don’t have it
(probably want to try a different article)
or
I...
Task No. 2
In the bibliography of the primary article, determine if each source (the
journal in which the cited article wa...
Cited Sources
Are the cited sources peer-
reviewed?
 Look up the titles of the cited journals in
UlrichsWeb.
 But, what if you only ha...
Are you unsure of the name of the
cited source?
 Mar . Ecol . Prog . Ser. ?
 Use the CAS Source Index (CASSI) website.
1...
Are you unsure of the name of the
journal for your new article?
 CASSI will try to return the likely full title(s) of the...
Task No. 3
Locate copies of 4 of the articles listed in the bibliography of the primary article.
Find a peer-reviewed
arti...
Does the library have that
journal?
 Go to the library homepage (lib.fit.edu)
 Click on the “A to Z Journal link on the
...
Does the library have that
journal?
 Here’s the journal
 Sometimes, the library will not have
the journal, in which case...
Getting an on-line copy of the new article
 Either locate a copy of
the article by clicking
on the link for the
issue in ...
Getting hard copy of the new article
 The Florida Tech Library still has some
journals in print (hard copy) form.
 Kept ...
Questions?
Contact Information:
Rob Sippel
Evans Library, #123
rsippel@fit.edu
321-674-7585
Feedback
 We welcome your feedback on this
presentation
 http://goo.gl/forms/gcrJ1OSi5m
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Ocn ens 3911 (spring 2017)

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presentation for Florida Tech OCN/ENS 3911 class.

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Ocn ens 3911 (spring 2017)

  1. 1. Rob Sippel Geospatial & Numeric Data Librarian Liaison to the Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences
  2. 2. Please copy down this link http://libguides.lib.fit.edu/OCN-ENS3911 (It contains all the information you need to complete this assignment)
  3. 3. You have the following tasks: Find a peer-reviewed article (your “primary article”) from a journal in your field. In the bibliography of the primary article, determine if each source (the journal in which the cited article was published) is peer-reviewed. Locate copies of 4 of the articles listed in the bibliography of the primary article.
  4. 4. Task No. 1 Find a peer-reviewed article (your “primary article”) from a journal in your field. Find a peer-reviewed article (your “primary article”) from a journal in your field. In the bibliography of the primary article, determine if each source (the journal in which the cited article was published) is peer-reviewed. Locate copies of 4 of the articles listed in the bibliography of the primary article.
  5. 5. Some preliminary questions 1. What is a peer-reviewed article? 2. How do I know if an article is peer reviewed?
  6. 6. What is a peer-reviewed article? Scholarly/peer-reviewed/refereed papers are reviewed by experts (peers) in very specific fields to ensure that:  The paper is based on original research  Research is performed using proper and rigorous scientific methodology  The paper adds to the body of knowledge. Peer-reviewed publications are considered to be of the highest quality for academic research.
  7. 7. How do I know an article is peer- reviewed? (continued) Therefore: 1. Check to see if the journal in which the article was published uses peer-review. 2. If the journal uses peer-review, see if the article has the characteristics of a peer- reviewed article. ○ Even if a journal uses peer review, it may publish content that is not peer-reviewed. ○ For example, Letters to the Editor are (typically) not peer-reviewed; neither are book reviews.
  8. 8. Does the journal use peer- review? Check Ulrichsweb Search for the journal name (e.g. Nature or Science) Look for a referee jersey next to the journal’s name (remember, peer- reviewed articles are also called “refereed” articles)
  9. 9. What are the characteristics of a peer-reviewed article?  If your article was published in a journal that uses peer-review, you now need to establish whether the article has characteristics typical of a peer-reviewed article.  Characteristics may relate to:  The article title  The publication in which the article was published.  Author information  Submission versus publication dates  Article sections ○ For example, Abstract, Introduction, Literature Search, Arguments, Methodology, Results, Conclusions, References  Charts, Graphs, and Equations  The text (e.g. types of nomenclature).  Not every peer-reviewed paper will share every one of these characteristics.  However, they should have many of them.
  10. 10. Peer-reviewed article: The Title Title: may summarize the articles contents, and will usually contain technical terms that are specific to the subject of the research.
  11. 11. Peer-reviewed article: The Title Example of an article title from a publication that does not use peer-review Article title from an issue of Popular Science
  12. 12. Peer-reviewed article: The Authors Authors: List of authors will also include their credentials (helps establish their authority) and may also have associated contact information
  13. 13. Peer-reviewed article: Submission and Publication Dates Submission & Publication Dates: Provide a history of when the paper was first received, accepted and published. Reflects the time required for the peer- review process to take place.
  14. 14. Peer-reviewed article: The Publication Publication: Provides the title of the journal in which the article was published, as well as the volume/issue numbers, page numbers, etc.
  15. 15. Peer-reviewed article: The Abstract Abstract: Briefly summarizes the contents of the article (useful for quickly establishing whether the article pertains to your research)
  16. 16. Peer-reviewed article: The Introduction Introduction: Addresses the topic or problem being addressed by the research, as well as the contexts and reasons for the research. Introductions may include literature reviews, although these may also appear as separate sections.
  17. 17. Peer-reviewed article: Charts, Graphs, and Equations related to data Charts, Graphs and Equations: Relate to the data collected and analyses performed in the course of the research
  18. 18. Peer-reviewed article: The Text Article Text: In addition to the Introduction, sections may include a Literature Review, Arguments, Experimental Methods, Results and Conclusions. The text will often be highly technical and use terminology unfamiliar to the general public.
  19. 19. Peer-reviewed article: The Conclusion Conclusion: Summarizes the results of the research
  20. 20. Peer-reviewed article: The References References: Lists each of the articles cited by the author(s).
  21. 21. How do I find my primary article?  Use one of the library’s research databases.  Research databases allow you to simultaneously search for articles in many scholarly journals.  The library provides access to almost 150 different research databases.  Which one(s) should you use?
  22. 22. Selecting a Research Database 1. Go to the library homepage: lib.fit.edu 2. On the left-hand side, click on the “Research Guides” link. 3. Find and click on the link for “Ocean Engineering & Science”. 4. Go to the “Articles & Databases” tab.
  23. 23. Select a Database from the list of Key Databases.
  24. 24. Searching for Primary Article If you see an option for limiting results to peer-reviewed content, select it. Select “Advanced Search”.
  25. 25. Searching for Primary Article Look for option to limit search to peer-reviewed content. Enter a topic of interest. Look for articles for which your topic is a subject Limit date range (optional). Search!
  26. 26. Searching for Primary Article Results! Click on titles for more details.
  27. 27. Getting a copy of your primary article. Two possibilities: either 1. You have immediate access to a PDF, or 2. You need to check whether the library has the article in its collections.
  28. 28. Using 360 Link Two possibilities: either 1. We have it 2. We don’t have it (probably want to try a different article) or If you search the catalog, you might find that the library has a print (but not online) copy of the article.
  29. 29. Task No. 2 In the bibliography of the primary article, determine if each source (the journal in which the cited article was published) is peer-reviewed. Find a peer-reviewed article (your “primary article”) from a journal in your field. In the bibliography of the primary article, determine if each source (the journal in which the cited article was published) is peer-reviewed. Locate copies of 4 of the articles listed in the bibliography of the primary article.
  30. 30. Cited Sources
  31. 31. Are the cited sources peer- reviewed?  Look up the titles of the cited journals in UlrichsWeb.  But, what if you only have an abbreviated title for the journal (UlrichsWeb requires the full title)
  32. 32. Are you unsure of the name of the cited source?  Mar . Ecol . Prog . Ser. ?  Use the CAS Source Index (CASSI) website. 1. Enter abbreviated journal title 2. Search
  33. 33. Are you unsure of the name of the journal for your new article?  CASSI will try to return the likely full title(s) of the journal. Now that you have the full name of the journal, you can confirm (using Ulrichsweb) that the journal uses peer review.
  34. 34. Task No. 3 Locate copies of 4 of the articles listed in the bibliography of the primary article. Find a peer-reviewed article (your “primary article”) from a journal in your field. In the bibliography of the primary article, determine if each source (the journal in which the cited article was published) is peer-reviewed. Locate copies of 4 of the articles listed in the bibliography of the primary article.
  35. 35. Does the library have that journal?  Go to the library homepage (lib.fit.edu)  Click on the “A to Z Journal link on the left side of the page (under the “Evans Library” heading.  Search for journal name.
  36. 36. Does the library have that journal?  Here’s the journal  Sometimes, the library will not have the journal, in which case you probably want to use a different paper.  You can either  Access the new article online or  Find the new article on the 2nd floor of the library.
  37. 37. Getting an on-line copy of the new article  Either locate a copy of the article by clicking on the link for the issue in which it was published or  Search for the article (for example, enter all or part of the article title)
  38. 38. Getting hard copy of the new article  The Florida Tech Library still has some journals in print (hard copy) form.  Kept on the 2nd Floor  Generally stored in alphabetical order  Can make digital copies of the articles using either of the two scanners on the ground floor.  If you annotate a hard copy of the bibliography of your primary article by hand, the ground floor scanners can also be used to digitize your annotated bibliography for submittal.
  39. 39. Questions? Contact Information: Rob Sippel Evans Library, #123 rsippel@fit.edu 321-674-7585
  40. 40. Feedback  We welcome your feedback on this presentation  http://goo.gl/forms/gcrJ1OSi5m

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