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Express Issue 12 Print

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Express Issue 12 Print

  1. 1. Tuesday, April 5th 2016 | uccexpress.ie | Volume 19 | Issue 12 Stan McManaman - News Writer Once planning permission is granted, work is due to to commence on the site of the old Windle Building. Architects O’Donnell + Tuomey are designing a brand new student building, as laid out in the University Strategic Plan, which aims to deliver “research- inspired teaching and learning with a world-class student experience”. The state-of-the-art “Hub Building” will have a major impact on student life in UCC. The Student Hub will be a 5 story, technology-rich building for all students. The building will be a new home to Clubs, Societies, Student Media, the Students’ Union, UCC 98.3fm and all Student Activities. The entire building will be open to students to use as study spaces, pop-up locations for events or whatever they can think of! A kitchenette will allow students bring in their own food and hot water points throughout the building mean students can get their all-important caffeine fix. The new student building will have an entrance hall for large- scale exhibitions & events, an impressive stepped space for performances & guest speakers, a fully equipped radio station, an art / maker space and dedicated employability skills areas. High- tech group project rooms will be available and the building will have collaborative common spaces throughout. The top floor of the building will contain a remarkable open-plan space, with views of the surrounding city & county, which will be used for large-scale University & student events. This incredible space will be set up as a common area when not in use and will be a destination room for visitors to the University. O’Donnell + Tuomey are internationally renowned architects who have previously worked on the Glucksman Gallery in UCC and the London School of Economics Student Centre. Recently they were awarded the Royal Gold Medal, architecture’s highest award, in recognition of their lifetime’s work as a “tour de force in Irish and British architecture”. The new building is set to become home to many student services which are currently distributed across 25 different locations. This will centralise many of the services that students frequently use including the Careers Service, Disability Service, Mature Student Office, UCC+ and many more. (Continued on Pg.3...) Work to Begin on New Student Hub This Summer A WHOLE NEW WORLD: Artists’ rendering of what the new Hub building will look like upon completion (PHOTO: New Works Media & UCCSU) Kylemore Win Food Award Pg. 5 - News History of the Windle Building Pg. 8 - Features Interview: ‘The Kentucky Gentleman’ Chuck Taylor BYLINE Magazine
  2. 2. Inside Today: UCC in the Seanad Page 4 Homelessness & Cork Page 6 Accountability in SU Page 8 Concussions in Sport Page 10 Results Night Photos Page 12 Match Reports Page 14 Editor-in-Chief: Brian Conmy Deputy & News Editor: Zoë Cashman Deputy News Editor: Chris McCahill Features Editor: Deirdre Ferriter Deputy Features Editor: Katie Jeffers Sport Editor: Dylan O Connell Sport Editor: Aaron Casey Photo Editor: Emmet Curtin Designer: Robert O’Sullivan Byline Editor: Xander Cosgrave Fiction Editor: Austin Dowling Humour Editor: Lauren Mulvihill Arts & Lit Editor: Colm Furlong Film & TV Editor: Olivia Brown Gaming Editor: Aoife Gleeson Music Editor: Holly Cooney Fashion Editor: Jessica NiMhaolain Fashion Editor: Kenneth Nwaezeigwe Editorial team /UCCExpress UCCExpress.ie @UCCExpress 2 | Letters from the Editors So Long, Farewell, Etc. So as of this issue it’s been around a year since I got the position of Express editor. The year has flown, 12 issues released, no lawsuits, no hostile takeovers. The year has been stressful but rewarding, fun at times and crushing at others. Now that it’s finally at an end though, I’m a little lost for words. While I have an entire other semester left in my masters to deal with so this goodbye isn’t quite a “oh no the crushing reality of post-college life is incoming, brace for impact”, it does feel a bit like an end of an era. I’ve been involved in the Express for over three years in one way or another and it has been a bigger part of my life as my college experience has trudged on. This is really the end of the line though, I’m in the process of picking my successor and figuring out the specifics of a full handover. At some point I’m sure “the feels” will hit me but it hasn’t yet. Even as I sit in PJs editing the final bits and pieces of this issue and writing this it’s still a bit surreal. My last act as editor will be representing the Express, along with some of its crew, at the Student Media Awards on Thursday. We picked up a great number of nominations, many for individual work and one for Newspaper of the Year which I couldn’t be happier about. That nomination represents a recognition of the amount of work that has gone into 12 issues, one year, hundreds of hours and hundreds of thousands of words. Hopefully we take home a few awards but either way I couldn’t be proud- er of the team I put together to make this paper a reality. While this is a goodbye from me, it’s also a thank you. Not only to the team I’ve worked with for so many months now but to you for reading the Express. At times it’s seemed like the work was for naught but when a story picked up or when we heard from readers on various topics, through various methods, it made it all a bit more worthwhile. So, if you’re reading this, then thank you. If you submitted to us this year, thank you. If you’re thinking of writing for us or applying for a posi- tion, then thank you even more. If you used the paper to clean a wet bench, in full view of an Express member, then royally fuck you. Other than that, thanks. Brian Conmy - Editor-In-Chief Drawings of the proposed Hub Tuesday, April 5th 2016 | UCC EXPRESS
  3. 3. | 3 Story Continued from the Front Page... Kylemore Grab International Food Award for UCC President Responds to Unfair Selection Process Allegations Kylemore Services Group (or KSG), the group that runs the Main Rest, Coffee Dock and Elements Cafe among other eateries & cafes in UCC, has won an award at the prestigious Food Made Good Sustainable Restaurant Association awards this year. KSG walked home with the title of ‘Irish Food Made Good Champion 2016’, beating out stiff competition from Ashford Castle, a five- star hotel on the Galway-Mayo border. The Food Made Good awards is an independently-ran awards ceremony organised by the Sustainable Restaurant Asso- ciation to recognise the quality of food & the efforts made by restaurants in the UK & Ireland to provide a high standard of service. Food Made Good ex- plained KSG’s winning of the award by detailing the many things on offer for students in UCC, saying: “Students and staff can enjoy home-grown herbs and vege- tables to complement produce supplied by a group of local producers and farmers. A nutri- tionist is on hand for advice on healthy eating and students can also buy fresh fruit and veg at regular ‘market days’.” This award follows KSG being awarded a three-star rating by the same organisation. This rat- ing shows KSG’s commitment to ensuring the sustainability of its restaurants & cafés. Food Made Good explains the rating that this means KSG scored 70% or more in its Food Made Good rating, demonstrating an exceptional standard of sustain- ability. Also receiving an award on the night was celebrity chef Jamie Oliver; known for his cookbooks & many cam- paigns for the introduction of healthy school lunch- es in the UK, Oliver was the recipient of Raymond Blanc Sustainability Hero Award. Kylemore Services Group was also nominated for the University of the Year award, narrowly missing out to Plymouth University. Manag- ing Director of KSG Michael Gleeson was on-hand at the ceremony to pick up the Irish Food Made Good Champion 2016 on behalf of the catering group, grabbing selfies with the aforementioned Jamie Oliver and legendary chef Raymond Blanc. UCC President, Michael Murphy, took to the courts on Friday and defended the selection process used to create a shortlist of candidates for 10 professional roles in its busi- ness school. Legal action was taken by a senior UCC lecturer, Dr. Joan Buckley, who is head of its Management and Marketing department. She took legal action after she failed to make the shortlist and is trying to stop the university’s busi- ness school from conducting interviews this week to hire the ten professors. The decision to make up ten professional level appointments at the Cork University Business School is described in the ad as a “land- mark initiative”. Dr. Joan Buckley was among the 252 applicants but she wasn’t called for interview. She claims the selection pro- cess was “grossly unfair and tainted”, an accusation which is strongly denied by President Michael Murphy. Given her contribution to the business school, her extensive research and her social standing, Buck- ley has described the decision to not include her in the short- list as “inexplicable”. She also stated se was “astounded and distressed” when she was noti- fied and had to take sick leave on the advice of her GP. Buck- ley also expressed concern at the omission of her department in a foreword by President Mi- chael Murphy in the Candidate Information Pack. On Friday she asked the High Court to suspend interviews while she challenges what she believes to be a flawed selection process. In a sworn affidavit, Murphy said the selection process was carried out in full conformity with university regulations and in a transparent manner. He acknowledged Buckley’s “large contribution” to the school but said she was not entitled to any preferential treatment. Buck- ley’s application was not grant- ed and fourteen candidates will be interviewed this week, but UCC’s business school has been ordered not to many any appointments by the High Court. The case will return in court this week to allow the University time to respond to her allegations. Rob O’Sullivan - Designer Zoe Cashman - News Editor AR AN GCAMPAS Gaeilge? Dáta deireanach: UCC EXPRESS | Tuesday, April 5th 2016 Using the new Creative Zone in the library as a model, the building also hopes to create a sense of ownership and identity among the student body, providing new study and group spaces, innovative teaching and learning spaces and new open common spaces for all students to use.t Barry Nevin, UCCSU Comms Officer, who has worked on the project for the past two years said, “This is going to be a an incredible building for everyone. There’s going to be amazing spaces for people involved in Clubs, Societies or any student to use. For the whole building, we have been looking to spaces like Facebook / Google offices for inspiration so every space will be an exciting, creative area to work in!”. The University will be rolling out a number of initiatives over coming weeks and months to introduce all students and staff to the new building, get input and engage everyone in this exciting project. The history and legacy of the building as an important feature to medical and other alumni will also be preserved as part of the project. A website is under construction that will be the home for all news, updates and competitions. There will soon be information stands in the library with a 3D model of the new building, designs, images and project updates. Once planning permission is granted it is planned to commence the enabling works over the Summer followed by the main works with a projected completion in 2018. Head of Student Experience & Project Lead Dr.Michael Byrne added: “The new Student Hub has the potential to truly transform the student experience for all our students. Whether it is the provision of the wide range of new technology-rich learning spaces, the new opportunities for faculty to deliver exciting and innovative experimental teaching in new spaces, the improved student administration experience with a new electronic and physical interface, or the improved support experience through co-location of over 25 student facing services or functions, the Student Hub will aim to deliver on UCC’s ambition to deliver a world-class student experience”
  4. 4. 4 | Trans Youth Forum Calls on Government for Reform US Firm Vows to Fight Berkeley Victims in Court Rob O’Sullivan - Designer Zoë Cashman - News Editor The Trans Youth Forum report was launched on March 31st, International Transgender Day of Visibility. The report, a joint partnership between Transgen- der Equality Network Ireland (TENI), BeLonG To Youth Ser- vices and the Irish Transgen- der Student Alliance (ITSA), documents the findings from the first Trans Youth Forum that was held in July 2015. The report included the responses of 55 participants between the ages of 14-25. The event was opened by Senator Jillian van Turnhout, and the launch in- cluded a panel discussion with three young trans people. TENI, BeLonG To and ITSA used the launch of the report to call on the Government to improve healthcare, educa- tion and legal recognition for young trans people, noting that it was crucial that the Gender Recognition Act (which was enacted last year) is revised to allow those under 18 years of age to have their gender legally recognised, including those who identify as non-binary or intersex. Speaking at the event, TENI Chief Executive Broden Giam- brone said “this report clearly illustrates that trans young people need explicit support and protection in all spheres of their lives. We call on the Government to act swiftly to protect the rights of these young people.” Lisa McKenny, Coordinator of IndividualiTY (BeLonG To’s trans youth support group) added: “In Be- LonG To LGBT youth groups in Dublin and nationally we see firsthand the extreme isolation and vulnerability that trans young people and their families experience. Young people often face numerous barriers around recognition of their true gender such as use of their correct pronouns, access to appropriate bathrooms and wearing suita- ble school uniforms.” The Trans Youth Forum was the first time that this many young Irish trans people were able to come together to dis- cuss their experiences. “This is an historic report because it represents the views of young trans people about their own lives,” said Cearbhall Turrao- in, one of the report’s authors. Jay Pope, 16, a member of IndividualiTy who took part in the panel discussion, stated the personal importance of taking part in the Trans Youth forum: “As both a teenager and a trans person, so often my own opinions about my own life are ignored, but for once we were expressly listened to. That was amazing.” TENI, BeLonG To and ITSA have urged every member of the new Dáil to read this report, in conjunction with the recently published LGBTIreland report, and to ensure that trans young people are protected. “Trans young people are com- ing out at a much younger age now and they & their families need support and recognition. That is why we are here and why this report is so impor- tant,” said McKenny, adding: “The LGBTIreland report published last week showed how transphobic bullying and prejudice leads to high levels of anxiety, depression, self harm and even suicide amongst young trans & intersex people. However we also know that this is solvable. We can change this.” “The Gender Recognition Act was an incredible step forward for the trans community in Ire- land. But we’re not done. TENI will be actively campaigning to ensure that trans young people are protected and their rights must be enshrined,” concluded Giambrone. The Trans Youth Forum report is available online on Teni.ie. For more information on the report or the discussion at the forum you can contact TENI Chief Executive Broden Giam- brone on director@teni.ie. BlackRock Inc, the owners of the building at the centre of the fatal Berkeley balcony collapse last summer plan to “vigor- ously” fight the multi-million dollar lawsuits being taken by survivors and relatives of the dead. According documents seen by the Irish Independent, Black- Rock Inc claimed the civil suits were “without merit”. The New York corporation announced its intention to contest the case in a filing to the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). It is the first defendant in the case to publicly state its intention to fight allegations of negligence. The move comes as a further blow to the families of the Irish students and one Irish-Ameri- can student who died, and sev- en others who suffered serious injuries as a result of the trage- dy last June. Earlier this week, prosecutors announced there would be no criminal charges following a nine-month inves- tigation. Now the survivors and families will be up against the financial might of a corporation consid- ered to be the world’s largest asset management firm. In a le- gal filing to a court in Califor- nia, lawyers representing most of the families also warned that more defendants could end up contesting the case. Lawyers Michael Kelly and Matthew Davis stated that “it is antici- pated that some defendants will file challenges to the pleadings or portions thereof”. The remaining defendants could announce their intentions at a hearing that is scheduled for the Alameda County Supe- rior Court in California later this month. BlackRock Inc and six related companies were among 35 defendants named in lawsuits filed last November. Claims against three of the defendants were subsequently withdrawn. The remaining 32 defendants include companies who owned, built and managed the Library Gardens building in Berkeley, California, where the balcony of apartment 405 collapsed. Thirteen lawsuits filed by the survivors and relatives of the victims last November claimed the defendants “cut corners” and did not heed numerous warnings indicating the balco- ny was unsafe. It was claimed that Blackrock Inc had notice that the balco- ny had not been constructed in accordance with accepted safety practices. The lawsuit also claims that the BlackRock companies were made aware that mushrooms were growing out of the balcony. There was claimed to be “an unambiguous red flag warning that the wood- en joists were rotting and that the balcony was at risk of col- lapse”. BlackRock Inc stated that they intend “to vigorously defend these actions”. Irish J1 students Eoghan Culligan, Lorcan Miller, Nick Schuster, Eimear Walsh, Olivia Burke and Olivia’s Irish-Amer- ican cousin Ashley Donohoe died after the fourth-floor balcony collapsed and fell to the ground. Seven other Irish students were seriously injured. Given the number of plaintiffs and defendants involved, it is likely to be several months before the cases get beyond the preliminary hearing stage. Tuesday, April 5th 2016 | UCC EXPRESS
  5. 5. | 5 ‘What’s in the Powder?’ Campaign Aimed at Students UCC Dominate Smedias Nominations Chris McCahill - Deputy News Editor Rob O’Sullivan - Designer On Friday 1st of April the Lord Mayor Criona Ní Dhalaigh launched a campaign urging students to think about Drug use, particularly about drugs in powder form. The Campaign aptly named the “What’s in the power?” campaign resulted from a collaboration between three Dublin universities- DIT, TCD and UCD and the Ana Liffey Drug Project. The campaign involves the distri- bution of posters and factsheets around campuses in addition to social media promotion via the drugs.ie website. Speaking at the launch of the campaign in the Mansion house, the Lord Mayor highlighted Ireland’s problem with Drug abuse: “After more than three dec- ades of drugs devastating our communities, Ireland’s drugs problem has gone way beyond the point of a crisis. For many people drugs are a reality and an established part of their lives. I personally know families that have seen three successive generations blight- ed by drugs - lives devastated by chaos, disease and death. We need action; and I take this opportunity to call on the next Government to prioritise Ireland’s drugs problem.” The Lord Mayor also took the opportunity to praise the various groups involved in the development of the “What’s in the Powder Campaign?” “I was very impressed to learn that the original campaign has expanded across the country. I believe that this harm reduction campaign, and its predecessor ‘What’s in the Pill?’ provides much needed information on drugs and drug use. While it’s always safest not to use illicit drugs at all, the reality is that people do use drugs. Given that this is the case, they need to be properly informed about the risks and how to reduce the potential for harm. I want to commend the work of the Student Welfare Officers and the staff of the Ana Liffey Drug Project for continuing to work together to bring this campaign into third level institutions.” Such sentiments were echoed by the various Welfare officers from the involved Dublin universities, Lysette Golden (DIT), Clare O’Connor (UCD) and Conor Clancy (TCD) who highlighted the manner in which the campaign was de- livered calling it “realistic and in-touch”, and highlighted the need for students who do en- gage in drug use to be educated in what the effects of various drugs on the body are. This campaign in particular focuses on providing informa- tion to reduce the harm from drugs in powder form. Al- ready in 2016 there have been a number of hospitalisations including one fatality in Ireland which has been reported in the national press. Tony Duffin, Director of the Ana Liffey Drug Project, said of the ‘What’s in the Powder?’ campaign: “The ‘What’s in the Pow- der?’ campaign provides third level students, and others, with knowledge that could save them from serious harm or death. Each year students arrive through the doors of their third level institutions full of life and looking forward to the future. Part of this expe- rience is to fully embrace this new found freedom. For some people, this will involve taking illicit drugs. Those people need clear, accurate and evidence based communication on this subject. That is what this cam- paign provides.” UCC’s student media outlets have re- ceived record numbers of nominations for the KBC National Student Media Awards, or SMEDIAS. Applications to the Smedias closed at the beginning of march, with both the UCC Express & Motley Magazine entering multi- ple categories. Last year the Express received 8 nominations total, walk- ing away with the awards for Colour Writer of the Year (Brian Conmy) and News Photographer of the Year (Emmet Curtin), and Motley received eight nominations, winning the cov- eted Magazine of the Year award as well as the People’s Choice Award & Outstanding Achievement Award for designer Cathal O’Gara. Both Motley & the Express eclipsed last year’s efforts, with the Express getting 11 nominations & Motley receiving 9. The nominations for UCC Express are the following: Newspa- per of the Year, News Photographer (Emmet Curtin), Short Story (Xan- der Cosgrave), Colour Writer (Rob- ert O’Sullivan), Best Blog (Lauren Mulvihill), EU Commission Award (Olivia Brown, Brian Conmy, Sam McNally), Layout & Design - News- paper, Website of the Year & People’s Choice. Motley, the only major student magazine not included as a supplement to another publication, received the following: Features Writer Arts and Pop Culture (Claire Fox), Short Story (Eoghan Scott, Hannah Kingston), Fea- tures Writer News and Politics (Eoin McSweeney), Colour Writer (Kyle Malone, Leah Driscoll), EU Commis- sion Award (Claire Fox), Editor of the Year (Ellen Desmond), Magazine of the Year & People’s Choice. Last year’s awards saw over 1,000 entries from colleges all across Ireland, with a turnout of over 600 people on the actual night of the awards. The Smedias recognise talent students have in the various areas of media & pub- lishing, including print media, film, radio & photography, including many awards for media produced in the Irish language. The winners will be an- nounced at the award ceremony in the Aviva Stadium in Dublin on April 7th, with all winners receiving a Smedias trophy. Winners of the EU Commission Award (for which UCC has 4 nominees total) will receive €1,000 & will have their article published in a national publication. UCC EXPRESS | Tuesday, April 5th 2016 Doppio is a newly opened cafe at 30 College Road, Cork! Come in and try one of our delicious cups of coffee, sourced from two of Cork's very best coffee roasters and prepared by one of our expertly trained baristas. If coffee's not your thing we also offer a selection of teas and Belgian hot chocolates to go along with our range of locally produced pastries, sandwiches, salads and gluten free cakes made fresh every momorning. Eat in or takeaway we've got you covered! Bring This Ad To Us And Get 2 Coffees For The Price of 1!
  6. 6. 6 | UCCSU- An Insider’s Year in Review Aidan Coffey - UCC Students’ Union President Ah, I’m back in familiar territory now - up late on a Saturday night, desperately hammering away at an assignment whose deadline is already passed. It’s nearly exactly a year since I was at this caper last – trying to salvage what scraps I could of modules so rudely, eh, interrupted, by the slog of an SU election campaign. With a new SU Exec elected, and staff and students alike cheerily throwing about phrases such as “put your feet up,” “lame-duck,” and “that’s a problem for the new crowd to sort,” it’s probably a suitable time to reflect on the year that has been for UCCSU - so far. Working on the Students’ Union is a great job, but it’s a tough job. The year hurtles along at a ferocious pace and it can be difficult affording the important long-term tasks suitable priority over the immediate and urgent ones. When we started back last July, we sat down and identified our priorities. These priorities are written on a massive sheet of paper and occupy pride of place on my office wall – they greet me when I open the door in the morning, and bid me fare- well in the evening. Every day we work, we work towards these priorities. Some we have achieved, some still need a bit more time. I’ve no intention of turning this piece into an exhaustive list of achievements and victories (as incredibly tempting as that is), because after all, that’s what we’re paid to do – although I’ll definitely mention a few! I’m much more interested in talking about the challenges, the difficulties and the obstacles that can make this perceived dream job in the SU more frustrating, draining and crushing than I think many people realise. Let’s start with the good stuff. One year ago, myself and my election-ticket compa- dre, Mr. Joe Kennedy, committed to finally delivering on the ‘old reliables,’ that (I can only assume) have graced SU election manifestos since George Boole himself consumed the first pint of Nom Nom in the New Bar – library, WiFi, counselling, Brookfield Common Room, etc. As I happily discovered, our newly-elected col- leagues thought along similar lines. So when I return to UCC as a student at the end of August, I can look forward to a Boole library that opens until 2am, sockets where I can charge my laptop, if I own one, or laptops I can borrow, if I don’t. I’ll look forward to the €2m to be invested in Wifi across campus, in the places that actually need it. I’ll be able to make a cup o’ scald or reheat some homemade dinner in a microwave in a new Brookfield Common Room (or in the Music Department, or in Copley Street, for that matter). Free STI miniscreens, increased psychiatric appointments and more workshops from Student Counselling will be available. Any of my Trans* friends and col- leagues can go to the bathroom across campus, in dignity. Intern nurses are paid minimum wage. Construction will have started on a new student building that will transform how students learn and interact with UCC. Dear reader, please be under no illusions – sockets don’t fall from the sky; common rooms don’t grow on trees and the student voice isn’t heard unless it is raised - these positive developments are direct results of SU lobbying, planning and campaigning. It takes time, which I can appreciate is frustrating – but shouting and screaming, or writing big angry Facebook posts, doesn’t achieve results – these achievements result from extensive research, preliminary work, digging through reports and recommendations, prepar- ing for meetings and nailing the argument and delivery when it matters most. I’m very proud to be a part of a team that makes writing future election manifestos that bit more difficult for future candidates. That said, I wouldn’t for a second imply it’s all been perfect. Believe me - if there’s something about the SU that annoys you, it probably annoys and frustrates me ten times more. I’ve dealt with students disappointed with Graduation Balls, or the Arts Ball queue. Grandiose plans for a RAG Year are off to a steady, but not as spectacular a start as I would have liked. I have lists and lists of ideas, of dreams, of half-sketched theories and plans that, for one reason or another, will unfor- tunately never see the light of day, as wonderful as they would have been. The moment you realise that something isn’t going to work out, or that something we did upset some students, is like getting kicked in the stomach. With a million and one things happening in the office, and, with a single-year term, only one chance to deliver, the stakes are high. It’s absolutely wonderful when things work out, but when they don’t, it’s very tough and disappointing. Representing the diversity one gets in a population of 20,000 students presents its own challenges. I hear from students annoyed that they get too many emails from me (or not enough), critical that we’re not on campus enough (or around too much). I’ve read bizarre and misguided personal comments and abuse about me and my colleagues and the work we do (or the work students think we don’t do). I steadily grow more and more weary of a needless suspicion for the Students’ Un- ion (that extends well beyond a healthy atmosphere of accountability and question, which is crucial) – even amongst people and friends I would have worked closely with over the years. Much of this could be examined under the wonderfully broad term “Student En- gagement.” Results from the recent Student Experience Survey indicated 37% of respondents had used the Students’ Union – a figure I believe is vastly understated, given the 4,000 students who receive Orientation Packs, the 1,600 who attend Arts Ball, the many thousands of students who have attended RAG events throughout the year, any of the 26,000 Facebook followers or 4,000 snapchat friends who regularly engage with us, not to mention users of the Common Room, Print Shop or recipients of free condoms. Achieving optimum student engagement is a tricky issue. At the outset, I asked the team that they divorce any egos or personal agendas from the job at hand – we work as a team, and take any successes or failures as a team. In a university envi- ronment that assaults us with information, I was less inclined to dedicate time to ensuring students know our names and faces (which is probably best done in Voo- doo on a Tuesday and Thursday), than I was with ensuring that all students know that there is this thing called a Students’ Union, and that if things go pear-shaped, that they know there is someone they can talk it over with, or get some advice. As far as I’m concerned, I don’t care if you know who I am – I just want you to know that there is a Students’ Union in UCC, and as President, I’ll make certain that you get all the advice and assistance you need. I’m reminded of two instances in town. The first in Holy Cow, where I was informed by a lady at the bar that “no-one knows who I am,” and another in Voodoo, where I was thanked by a gentlemen for attending the funeral of a student – his friend - several weeks previously. Com- ments like the latter matter so much more to me than the former. I’ve really enjoyed the year so far, and it’s an absolute honour to work on behalf of students in a university I love so much. To the students who voted last year, and have supported this year, a huge thanks. To those who feel we could be doing better, please, let me know and let’s make it happen. Thanks to this year’s team for being a pleasure to work with, and best of luck to next year’s. And hey, we still have three months to - you ain’t seen nothing yet. Tuesday, April 5th 2016 | UCC EXPRESS
  7. 7. 8 | History of the Windle Building 1845 1881 2005 2011 1907 1907 1849 1850 University College Cork was originally established as one of three Queen’s Colleges created at Cork, Galway and Belfast. Roof raised to double height to provide tiered seating and window added for light to the Anatomy lecture theatre The Medical School moved to the new Brookfield Complex. In September 2011 the department of Anatomy relocated its undergrad- uate teaching to the Western Gate Building. The teaching of Anatomy in UCC’s Windle Building had come to an end with the Department’s move to its new state of the art laboratories in the Western Gate Building. A new dissecting room was provided for the exclusive use of female medical students. Earlier, the dissecting room had been screened off so that men and women would be able to carry out their dissections separately from one another. A new dissecting room was provided for the exclusive use of female medical students. Earlier, the dissecting room had been screened off so that men and women would be able to carry out their dissections separately from one another. Queens University College Cork is first opened. A donation was provided by Lord Clarendon, then Lord Lieutenant of Ireland for a new medical building on the campus. Thomas Deane, one of the architects who designed the Quad - drew up plans to form part of the already existing Quadrangle complex. In honor of its benefactor, this medical building was originally known as the Clarendon Building. Early photo of the Clarendon(Windle). Photo by William Lawrence A model built by architects O’Donnell and Twomey showing previous extensions to the Windle Buidling Photograph of the last students in the Windle Building Dissecting room(September 2011) A photo of the old museum in the Windle Building Tuesday, April 5th 2016 | UCC EXPRESS
  8. 8. | 9 1909 1949 1980 1982 1866/7 1867 1877/8 The lecture theatre to the ground floor was made slightly smaller in order to provide a corridor giving access to a new single storey extension to the rear. The gallery was removed from the museum building, and a floor was installed. In the early 1980s the Anatomy Depart- ment was completely renovated internally. The Boole Library opened allowing the relocation of medical library materials to this new library, with space made availa- ble from this move allowing for the con- struction of a modern mortuary facility and a new dissecting room to the north end of the medical building on the upper floor of the former museum building. The Clarendon Building was extensively modified and extended in the mid-1860s by the Office of Pub- lic Works. Construction appears to have begun on the southernmost building first, housing a lecture theatre, with the central portion added shortly afterwards and linking this building to the Clarendon Building. The original block was bookended by two additional blocks to the including the Anatomy Dept and Lecture Theatres. A large L-shaped block was added to the north including dissecting rooms and a new museum. UCC EXPRESS | Tuesday, April 5th 2016
  9. 9. 10 | Floor Plans for New Student Hub Ground Floor First Floor Tower Floor 1 Tower Floor 3 Tower Floor 2 A floor-by-floor look at what’s going into the new Student Hub. 1. Clubs & Societies: An open-plan space for Clubs & Societies to use, including 35 workstations, a reception, admin offices and a project room. 2. Student Media: Open-plan workspaces for student media writers & private offices for editors. 3. Student Jobs Hub: Resource & waiting area, with a number of consultation rooms for one to one careers advice. 4. Art Room: This ‘wet space’ is available for students to use when working on projects that can get a bit messy! 5. UCC 98.3 FM: The hub will be the new home to UCC 98.3 fm. A large broadcasting window will provide major exposure for the station. 6. Walkway: This area of the building has been cut out to provide an outdoor public covered space that links the building with campus. 7. Welcome Zone: The main entrance to the building will have a desk that will provide a wide range of services to students. 8. Teaching & Learning Room: A bookable, creative teaching & learning space by day that is technology rich. 9. Entrance Hall: A large, multi-functional space that can house anything from pop-up exhibitions & freshers orientation to performances & concerts. This space will have a double height ceiling with tonnes of light and will be set up as a common space by default. 10. Co-Op Kitchen: Kitchen space open for students to heat food, make tea/coffee, etc. 11. New Landscaped Public Space: A new gathering, event & performance space outside the building. This will expand the activity 1. Students’ Union: Reception and open-plan office for Students’ Union Officers and admin staff. Includes consultation rooms & meeting areas. 2. Student Services Offices: The Building provides a centralised location for many of the student supports that are currently spread across campus 3. UCC+ Resource Room: A dedicated resource room for students involved in the UCC+ program. 4. Mezzanine: A creative learning and study space for group and individual work. The area has a coffee/tea point and flexible furniture. 5. Learning Bridge: A bridge overlooking the main hall of the building that connects the common areas to student services. A bench will also provide an area for students to sit and work. 6.The Shtepps: An impressive stepped space for performances, guest speakers, student & University events, etc. 7. Consultation Rooms: Used by the student services during the work day, these will be opened as bookable group / individual study spaces to students in the evening. 1. Careers Office: Open plan office for the careers service 2. Consultation Rooms: Consultation rooms for careers advice and student services. Open for student activities by night. 1. Top Floor Open Space: Large multifunctional space with a scenic view of the campus and Sunday’s well. A destination room in the building, this bookable space can be used for student & University events, conferences,ceremonies, exhibitions, performances, meetings, social events and more. 1. Open Project Space: Open teaching and learning space. 2. Project/Meeting Rooms: Bookable high tech project rooms, can be used by groups or individuals. 3. SU, Clubs & Societies Space: Additional meeting space for clubs & societies. Tuesday, April 5th 2016 | UCC EXPRESS
  10. 10. | 11 Is Harm Reduction the Only Reason to Reform Drug Policy? Eoin Perry - Features Writer Although largely an irrelevance during the general election, the government’s drug policies have attracted increasing attention in Ireland of late with discussions largely focusing on harm reduction. Indeed the issue has been explored quite ex- tensively from this angle by a number of writers for UCC Express, some of whom have cited statistics suggesting that the decriminalization of possession for personal use will lead to lower levels of overall use and less harm to users and society. All I’ll say from this perspective is that I have yet to encounter a convincing argument against decriminalization. But as far I’m concerned this is not even where the discussion should begin. Harm reduction is important of course but there is a more fundamental concern, not captured by these statistics, which need to be addressed, and I’ve been disappointed to find it glaringly absent from the debate thus far. For me, decriminalization is more a question of the dignity and freedom to which each individual should be entitled than it is of harm reduction. I simply don’t believe it’s acceptable to prosecute someone, leaving them with a debilitating criminal record, for the ‘crime’ of consuming a harmful substance. “Even if decriminalization was expected to increase the statisti- cally measurable harm caused by drugs I might still support it, because in my view, advocates of criminalization need to explain not only how it reduces measurable harm, but why it does so to such an extent that it justifies persecuting a group of innocent people for pursuing their hobbies” Of course this is not a black and white issue and there are legitimate argument to the contrary, but it’s frustrating to see that a narrow minded assessment of harm reduction is the only thing that seems to concern most people in this debate. Even if decriminalization was expected to increase the statistically measurable harm caused by drugs I might still support it, because in my view, advocates of crim- inalization need to explain not only how it reduces measurable harm (which it doesn’t seem to), but why it does so to such an extent that it justifies persecuting a group of innocent people for pursuing their hobbies. I find it hard to believe that we have such little respect for the lifestyles of others and such a disregard for the value of personal freedom that this impingement of civil liberties doesn’t even merit a mention. Most people I’m sure would agree that every individual is entitled to ‘the pursuit of happiness’ or something along those lines. We need to acknowledge that for a significant number of people this pursuit of happiness will involve using drugs outside of the arbitrarily defined medical contexts that the law stipulates as acceptable. Whether it is to the benefit of society or not, the government is tyran- nizing these individuals by criminalizing their behavior, and for me this tyranny is pretty hard to justify. “If we viewed every issue through the statistical lens of harm reduction, without concern for civil liberties, we might consider banning quite a few activities. Big wave surfing maybe? Unequipped mountain climbing perhaps? What about gambling?” When a person uses a drug, they themselves are the only victim of this choice, and in my view they are no more criminals for doing so than those who participate in any other potentially reckless activity. If we viewed every issue through the statis- tical lens of harm reduction, without concern for civil liberties, we might consider banning quite a few activities. Big wave surfing maybe? Unequipped mountain climbing perhaps? What about gambling? If it was ever seriously proposed that al- cohol possession be criminalized I’m willing to bet that in a society where even tax increases are met with ‘nanny state’ allegations from some quarters, freedom would be foremost amongst the objections, not harm reduction. But when it comes to other drugs, hysteria and stigma tend to triumph over reason in the field of public debate. Of course with every government policy there are winners and losers. To decide if the policy is justified we need not only to estimate the quantity of each, but to determine which group is more worthy of sympathy. Personally I have more sympathy for the individual who is prosecuted for pursuing their own interests while harming no one but themselves and left with a criminal record for having done so than I do for the person who chooses to use drugs and ends up developing a problematic habit. That the former individual can be so harshly penalized simply to deter others from making poor choices is a gross violation of individual freedom and dignity, and for me, this is where the discussion should end. “Although the tide of opinion worldwide is turning against the war on drugs, it seems Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil intend to maintain the status quo for the moment, while most of the others parties are advocating some kind of reform” In November 2015 then minister of state Aodhán O’Riordan made the long over- due announcement that drug use would indeed be decriminalized, citing harm reduction as the reason for doing so. Unfortunately with the government in limbo at the moment it’s unclear if this will be implemented. Although the tide of opinion worldwide is turning against the war on drugs, it seems Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil intend to maintain the status quo for the moment, while most of the others parties are advocating some kind of reform. I’m optimistic that at some point in the future we will not need harm reduction statistics to make these kind of policy decision, it will no longer be seen as acceptable to prosecute someone for a victimless crime. But for the moment we’re a long way from this kind of political landscape. I can only hope that harm reduction concerns will be sufficient to tip the balance of opin- ion in the right direction in the near future. * * * *Positions are paid UCC EXPRESS | Tuesday, April 5th 2016
  11. 11. 12 | Tuesday, April 5th 2016 | UCC EXPRESS
  12. 12. | 13 Photos Courtesy of: Emmet Curtin Photography Tuesday, April 5th 2016 | UCC EXPRESS
  13. 13. 14 | Should Fallon Fox be Allowed to Fight in the UFC? Amy O’Regan - Sports Writer For those of you who don’t already know who Fallon Fox is, she’s a 5‘6“ 38 year-old transgender MMA fighter. She is also the first openly transgender athlete in MMA history, in the women’s featherweight division holding a 5-1 record. It’s for these reasons that she has become the target of prominent MMA figures, with Ronda Rousey and boss Dana White refusing to pit Rousey against the AMAB (‘Assigned Male At Birth’) fighter, believing Fox would have an unfair advantage over her opponents in the UFC. The question is do transgender fighters like Fox really have an unfair advantage over their female opponents in the UFC? According to medical experts who provide health care for trans people after several years of clinical treatment, in- cluding hormone therapy and sometimes gender-affirming surgeries, transgender women have musculature and bone structure that is largely similar to their cisgen- der counterparts, giving them no major advantage over their AFAB (‘Assigned Female At Birth’) opponents in an MMA fight. The Association for Boxing Commissioners has also ruled that there is no advantage for trans fighters. Fox has faced a lot of prejudice dealing with MMA opponents over the issue of being a transgender fighter in female feather- weight division. However, she has neither testi- cles nor ovaries, both which produce testosterone, in fact it’s highly likely her fe- male opponents produce more testosterone than she does. Fox has less muscle strength and bone density after her transition and a higher fat mass than most men but she’s within the range for most female fighters in terms of strength and fitness. Still, the issue is raised amongst those who Fallon has skillfully defeated in her MMA career, Tamikka Brents for example, who suffered orbital bone damage and required seven staples and a concussion to the head, felt that Fox had an unfair advantage ‘like no woman Brent had fought before’. While other fighters like Ash- lee-Evans Smith has made it clear that Fox shouldn’t fight women. Fox, in rebuttal, told the press that, “As the medical community that licensed me and other transgender athletes around the world in different sports can attest, we all fall within the physical parameters of women.” Want to write for UCC Express Sport? Email Aaron & Dylan on Sport@UCCExpress.ie for more information Tuesday, April 5th 2016 | UCC EXPRESSSport
  14. 14. | 15 Continued from Back Page... Spot The Dope Be Ambitious, Be Humble, Be City Ger Byrne - Sports Writer Ger Byrne - Sports Writer UCC EXPRESS | Tuesday, April 5th 2016 Sport Not all speakers made essentially ridiculous points; many speakers brought up a study conducted by HBO which found cases of domestic violence were more prevalent in MMA than in any other sport. One could argue that (and they did) the popularisation & influence of mixed martial arts could lead to an increase in domestic violence, especially in the context of the aforementioned study. However, not only is this the same strawman-type argument used against violent films or video games but also, as Earlene Hooper pointed out in the Assembly, the popularisation of MMA where one of its biggest stars is female (Ronda Rousey) could lead to a popularisation of training in self-defence & martial arts among both women and men who are victims of domestic abuse. Despite the odd comments, this Bill marks the end of a near-20 year ban of mixed martial arts in the Empire State, with the state athletic commission having 120 days to draw up a list of rules & regulations for the sport. Lorenzo Fertitta has said that New York may see two UFC events before the end of 2016, with a massive pay-per-view event in Madison Square Garden being one of the these. He also added that he wants UFC to set financial gate records at every arena they utilise, which may prove to be tough in “The World’s Most Famous Arena.” Poor Maria Sharapova. A little mistake with a medical substance has got her into trouble with those nasty people in the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). She was only using that Meldonium stuff to treat a heart condition, and she hadn’t heard about it being placed on the list of banned substances at the start of the year. You’d have to admire her, reaching the pinnacle of her profession while requiring medication for a heart ailment. But I don’t believe a word of it. Mature students (aka elderly wrecks like myself) will recall the Seoul Olympics when Ben Johnson representing Canada raced away with the gold medal for the one hundred metres. Well, not quite. Within hours came the rumour that “a prominent athlete has tested positive for a performance enhancing substance”. It didn’t take long to find out that it was Ben Johnson who’d fallen foul of the testers. He left Seoul in disgrace, leaving second-placed Carl Lewis to collect the gold. Ironic, since it subsequently emerged that the US authorities had turned a blind eye to two positive drug tests involving Lewis prior to the Olympics. Sports journalists now refer to the one hundred metres final in Seoul as the dirtiest race of all time, with seven of the eight runners believed to have been on performance-enhancers. The rot had set in long before the Seoul Olympics, however. For many years, the German Democratic Republic produced some fine swimmers, collecting medals wherever they competed. It was only when the Iron Curtain came down in the eighties that the truth emerged; they’d been doped up on an industrial scale as part of an official policy to use any means to enhance the nation’s reputation. The more recent controversy with Russian athletes isn’t new. We all remember Sonia O’Sullivan’s “Chinese Takeaway” which has only recently been revealed as another industrial scale doping operation. It’s one thing when disgruntled losers cut corners to reach the top, but when it’s imposed on them by people who should be leading the way in keeping sport in their country fair and clean, then we’re all in trouble. The authorities have ALWAYS been racing to catch up in the battle against the cheats and recent claims would indicate that the required level of diligence was not used. Should we blame them or the cheats for things getting so far out of hand? Two Irish athletes have been denied medals thanks to the cheats, and some Irish athletes have come out the wrong end of drugs controversies, too, so what should be done? The reward for playing fair, even if the cheats are subsequently caught, is to have the medal delivered to the honest athlete’s home by courier. That’s not good enough! The honest athlete has missed the time on the podium with the flag flying, the crowd cheering and the anthem playing. Let’s give it to them, however belatedly. Invite the athlete, at the governing body’s expense, to the next major event and present the medal in the manner that should have been done originally; flag flying, crowd cheering, anthem playing. Then, for good measure, on those giant screens which all these international stadia have, display the name, image, and offences of the now-disqualified cheat. Drastic action is needed because if something dramatic isn’t done, it will be all too clear who the dopes are, not the few cheats who get caught, not the negligent authorities, not even the poor innocent honest competitor. The dopes will be those many thousands of us who buy the tickets and travel long distances to follow our particular sport of choice in the naive expectation that we’re likely to see an honest contest. As for Sharapova, here’s why I don’t believe her: 1. Meldonium is not licensed for use in the USA, where she currently resides 2. WADA communicate all changes in the list of banned substances to all athletes on the international circuit 3. It is the responsibility of the athlete, and nobody else, to ensure that no banned substances are ingested. As for “poor Maria”, if I were as rich as her, I’d be a happy man indeed. As a member of FORAS, the Supporters Trust which owns Cork City Football Club, I recall at the beginning of last season team manager John Caulfield addressed a meeting and in addition to answering questions from supporters, warned that neither Cork City FC, nor anybody else, has a divine right to win trophies. That sounded very pessimistic to proud and ambitious Cork folk, but it’s true. It takes a lot of work and no little luck to reach the top. We’ve learnt the hard way, seeing the club going from the heights of beating teams from statistically far superior leagues in European competition to the depths of despair during the winding-up procedure in the Commercial Court shortly before FORAS stepped in. We’ve learned to be patient. A phrase much- used as we made our first faltering steps as a supporters-owned club was in the form of a warning; “Baby steps!” Don’t overreach yourself! It’s been hard at times to keep the faith. We’ve had good times, setbacks, glimpses of the old entertaining style of the Lennox era, and too much turgid stuff as inexperienced players came to grips with playing in the League of Ireland and other players passed on contract offers, apparently believing we were going nowhere. Over the last two seasons, however, we’ve seen glimpses of what might yet be achieved. Second in the league twice in the past two seasons to a very strong Dundalk side and losing out in last season’s FAI Cup Final to the same opposition only after extra time. How that crowd, like their neighbours before them, gloated. But maybe, just maybe, the tables are turning. Apart from the disappointing defeat to Derry at the Brandywell, it’s been a strong start to the season, with some very entertaining football being played, along with the display of grit and determination that we expect as an absolute minimum. As I write this, City top the league and Dundalk fans are moaning about City players bullying their heroes and intimidating match officials. I have to confess that as I write this piece, I haven’t seen any highlights from the match in Oriel Park, so I can’t judge on that one, but I was at the Cross for the President’s Cup and maybe Dundalk fans would care to remember Stephen O’Donnell’s high fielding which wouldn’t have looked out of place in Pairc Ui Chaoimh. It didn’t even earn a yellow card, which was lucky for the player, since he’d already seen yellow earlier in the game. Things happen; we’ve all suffered from bad decisions. Get over it! I sincerely hope that what happened to Shelbourne and Drogheda after their periods of dominance doesn’t happen to Dundalk FC. Both of those clubs descended into chaos and have yet to properly recover. If it does, a bit of humility while on top would elicit more sympathy if things go pear- shaped at a later stage. As for ourselves, things are looking up. Having beaten the league and cup champions twice in a matter of weeks, and being on top on goal difference while playing some entertaining football, there are definite grounds for optimism. There’s a long way to go, but if we do reach the top this season, I’m confident we can sprinkle our celebrations with a bit of humility. If it doesn’t work out, I’m sure we can take it with good grace and try again next time.
  15. 15. ucc sport MIXED martial arts fans’ dreams of seeing Ronda Rousey or Conor McGregor possibly fight in “The World’s Most Famous Arena” Madison Square Garden could soon come true as the New York State Assembly finally voted in favour of legalising the sport of MMA in the state. This ruling ends a near-20 ban on the sport in the state; in 1997 MMA was banned due to it being a largely unregulated sport at the time. As the years went by, however, the sport grew & evolved and became legal (if it wasn’t already) in all other 49 states, and was, for the most part, regulated by state athletic commissions; but New York held out. The delay was frequently chalked up to the fact that UFC owners Frank & Lorenzo Fertitta had issues with Sheldon Silver, Speaker of the New York State Assembly, over the lack of unionisation in the Fertitta’s New York casinos. Though completely unrelated to UFC or MMA it was assumed to be the main roadblock in MMA’s legalisation in the state until Mr.Silver was arrested & later found guilty on federal corruption charges and was automatically expelled from the Assembly in late 2015. Though its main adversary in the Assembly was now gone, it was not presumed MMA would have a totally easy ride; and while the vote passed by a massive margin (114 in favour of legalisation, 26 against) it wasn’t without utterly bizarre arguments from members of the Assembly, some of which I will go through now: Daniel O’Donnell (not that Daniel O’Donnell, though he is brother to comedienne Rosie O’Donnell) objected, remarking that MMA was “...two nearly naked, hot men rolling on top of one another, trying to dominate each other. Just in case you don’t know, that’s gay porn with a different ending,” despite his sister being both openly gay and openly a fan of MMA. Charles Barron compared it to African slaves being forced to fight on plantations in America, adding that “...throwing two human beings in a cage and you know how we used to say in our neighborhoods how you should have a fair fight, even when the man is knocked down when I grew up, you’re supposed to step back, let him get up and let’s start all over again” even though fights are stopped in sanctioned MMA if a fighter is clearly rattled, unlike in street- fights. Angela Wozniak said “...a registered sex offender could own an MMA school, they could teach in that facility and we can’t be naive to the fact that these people target these schools” despite several MMA schools being open in New York State already with little known consequence; in addition to this the same could be said for any kind of school or dojo. It should be noted that Ms.Wozniak voted in favour of the legalisation. Ellen Jaffee opposed it on the grounds that it “sanctions violence for profit,” despite boxing & professional wrestling being incredibly popular in New York for decades now. (Continued on pg.15...) MMA Finally Legalised in Bizarre Circumstances Judo Results Tuesday April 5th 2016 | uccexpress.ie | Volume 19 | Issue 12 NOTORIOUS MCG: Conor McGregor could be fighting in New York, in Madison Square Garden sometime soon (PHOTO: UFC/Irish Examiner) Rob O’Sullivan - Designer PREVIEW: Inside - Round-ups of Women’s Basketball- Cup Final, Fitzgibbon & Siggerson Cup First Rounds MMA Finally Legalised in New York State Katie O’Donovan; Gold Team Event, Bronze 63kg Cara Nies; Gold Team Event, Bronze Upper Kyu Aobh O’Shea; Gold Team Event, Gold 57kg Rosemine Achbang; Bronze Team Event, Bronze 57kg Erin Brightoo; Bronze Team Event, Silver Lower Kyu, Bronze 70kg Ciara Gildea; Bronze Team Event, Bronze 52kg Tim Kelly; Gold Team Event, Bronze Open Weight Andre Bilro; Gold Team Event, Gold 90kg

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