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Influence, Power, Integrity and your career in IT

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Influence, Power, Integrity and your career in IT

Creating an effective and respected personal leadership brand

Masterclass held at the ACS Youth in IT conference 2014 (Asia Pacific)

Published in: Leadership & Management
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Influence, Power, Integrity and your career in IT

  1. 1. Masterclass Youth in IT Conference 2014 © All rights reserved. Rob Livingstone Advisory Pty Ltd. Unauthorized redistribution prohibited without prior approval. Now on Paperback iPad Kindle Influence, Power, Integrity and your career in IT Creating an effective and respected personal leadership brand.
  2. 2. Influence, Power, Integrity and your career in IT Agenda 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align 2. Evidence based decision making vs. Opinions 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? 4. Managing your situational ‘circle of influence’? 5. The foundations of a resilient career 6. Masterclass exercise 7. Wrap-up and conclusions 8. Next steps
  3. 3. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align Power Influence Integrity How do you see yourself ? How do others see you? Reputation Professionalism $$$$$ Trust Brand
  4. 4. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align • Management, Leadership and integrity – what’s in the mix? • Analytical and charismatic / entrepreneurial managerial approaches – where two worlds collide?  Analytical: o Many task oriented individuals are driven by facts, processes, evidence. o IT professionals, engineers, accountants, for example, need to work with precision and in the ‘real’ world  Charismatic / emotive / subjective: o Short term, fast moving, goal oriented, agile, etc
  5. 5. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align Power vs. Influence? … it all depends on the situation
  6. 6. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align Categories of personal Power • Formal Power – tied to a formal position where the responsibilities of that position includes the ability to influence or make decisions affecting a community • Informal Power – not tied to any position, often resulting from personal characteristics. This power allows the person/group to influence and/or represent a community without formal decision making. Sources of formal or informal power: 1. Resources – money, knowledge, skills, materials 2. Elected or appointed position 3. Community support and/or representation
  7. 7. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align Sources of personal Power 1. Expertise – knowledge, skills and experience relevant to the task 2. Reward / coercive – You have the ability to reward or drive people and situations 3. Personal attraction – characteristics associated with likeability (“charisma” and ability to inspire) 4. Effort – dependability and evidence of higher than expected time commitment 5. Legitimacy – actions clearly display a particular value commonly held among partners 6. Connections – power through networks, association, etc 7. Information – Only you have the information that others need Discussion Can you think of any others? What bad experiences have you had / are having with anyone wielding their power, and what did /can you do about it?
  8. 8. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align Tips for creating influence 1. See value in empathy 2. Managing the ‘conversation’ • Steer, don’t block! • Open questioning • Inviting responses 3. The fragility of personal reputation 4. Handling objections from influential players 5. Controlling the discussion • Keeping focus • Never emotional 6. See and appreciate the broader context 7. Managing uncertainty and anxiety • Mental resilience • Self confidence (minus the ego!) 8. Avoid binary thinking
  9. 9. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align Sessio n 4 Here’s a tip for destroying influence
  10. 10. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align You have the ability to control your response to situations, and it is how you shape your response that will determine your ability to influence others. Formulate and direct your responses wisely.
  11. 11. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align Integrity and Ethics at the Organisational level • Organisations intend to operate with integrity. • Integrity breaches can cause serious damage to organisations, and even lead to their demise – brand damage – Staff satisfaction and high staff turnover – consumer boycotts – Investor / valuation downgrades – legal action – fines from regulators
  12. 12. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align Morals and Ethics Morals: • Concerned with the principles of right and wrong behaviour (Oxford) Ethics: • Moral principles that govern a person's behaviour or the conducting of an activity (Oxford) – Industries, professions and companies have ‘Codes of ethics’
  13. 13. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align Points for discussion: • What is ‘morality’ and how does that differ from ’ethics’? • How ’ethical’ are your top managers? • What are your ‘personal’ ethics and do they clash with your company? (eg Would you work for ‘big tobacco’?) • Can you interview for Integrity? • How can you distinguish ‘integrity’ errors from ‘genuine’ mistakes?
  14. 14. 1. Power, Influence, integrity – when the planets align International Journal of Disclosure and Governance Vol. 7, 3, 198–212, 2010
  15. 15. 2. Evidence based decision making vs. Opinions How do you make decisions on your career? • Stress-test your assumptions: In the face of uncertainty and complexity, assumptions lie at the core of all our decision making, whether they be job, career or business related. • Decisions made on the basis of incorrect assumptions can profoundly and adversely affect your career’s outcomes. • Distinguishing between correlation and causation, as well as common errors in logic (Type I and Type II errors)
  16. 16. 2. Evidence based decision making vs. Opinions Copyright: Rob Livingstone Advisory Pty Ltd ‘Direction through Disruption”
  17. 17. 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? The mythology and reality of Personal Brand
  18. 18. 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? • A great deal has been written and said about ‘personal brand’ in recent times. • No longer is it adequate to just do a great job, you have to tell the world about it, and more. • An entire industry has sprung up helping to fuel the personal branding movement, with many proponents offering a set recipe, or a ‘A winning 10 step program’ on how to develop that winning brand. • If it were only that simple!
  19. 19. 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? Identity and Negotiation • Your personal brand – Who are you? – Is this aligned with your career’s mission? – Will this identity have a market value? • Selling is just negotiation – IT professionals are not generally good at selling and promoting themselves in the organisation (tend to be task and outcome oriented)
  20. 20. 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? Recognition and communications • Overcome fear that driving for deserved recognition will make you appear obnoxious or egotistical • Delivering the message – The fundamentals of effective communication – Communication and presentation skills (Workshop and practical skills … Join Toastmasters) – Active listening and observation skills
  21. 21. 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? Networking • ‘Professional’ networking – what, when, how, why, who cares? – Importance of networking: Expanding your professional world – it’s key to you thriving and surviving – More than swapping business cards – Exchanging intrinsic value
  22. 22. 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? Consider the following broad definition: • A brand should indicate a consistent measure of quality associated with a product or entity. In the context of your career, however, personal branding can be loosely thought of as: • The practice of individuals consciously defining themselves, as well as their careers with a specific set of attributes that are visible to others
  23. 23. 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? • Personal brand, authenticity and perception management • Without contributing to the hype of personal branding or putting a ‘spin’ on this topic, the importance of the judicious and careful consideration of your personal branding to your career should not be underestimated.
  24. 24. 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? Here are some guidelines on defining your personal brand: 1. Be authentic: It is not advisable to misrepresent your fundamental persona. Your personal ethics and morality should play an integral part of your brand. 2. Be consistent on the fundamentals of who you are. Having rock solid reliability will stand you in good stead. 3. Define trustworthiness as part of your brand. Why should you be trusted? Trustworthiness is built on a mix of consistency and authenticity. 4. Not a public statement: Your sole purpose of developing a brand model is to help you shape your responses to challenges and define your approach to dealing with others. As an employee, the overt branding of yourself or flagrant self-promotion may be counterproductive in your career …. Or, on the other hand, it may be helpful! Know the implications.
  25. 25. 3. Is your personal ‘brand’ important? Here are some guidelines on defining your personal brand: 5. Has little to do with ego: Your feeling of self-esteem or self-importance has little to with the expression of your personal brand. Leave the ego at the door, unless your ego is your brand. 6. Confidence and objectivity: If you are able to be objective, that is, seeing yourself through the eyes of others, your brand will more likely be seen to be ‘authentic’. 7. Personal brand should not be confused with reputation: Reputation is a consequence of your actions, and is formed by others’ perspectives of you.
  26. 26. 4. Managing your situational ‘circle of influence’? Copyright: Rob Livingstone Advisory Pty Ltd ‘Direction through Disruption”
  27. 27. 4. Managing your situational ‘circle of influence’? Define context and scope: ie: Relationship between me and these individual stakeholders for <state purpose or objective> Copyright: Rob Livingstone Advisory Pty Ltd ‘Direction through Disruption”
  28. 28. 4. Managing your situational ‘circle of influence’? Keep Satisfied Monitor / observe Manage closely Keep updated and informed High Interest Power Low High Low Mendelow's Power-interest grid Stakeholder Analysis model
  29. 29. 4. Managing your situational ‘circle of influence’? CEO Boss Keep Satisfied Monitor / observe Manage closely Keep updated and informed High Interest Power Low High Low Mendelow's Power-interest grid Stakeholder Analysis model B A
  30. 30. What organisation model is your career based on? Self sufficiency, adaptability, speed, multi-skilled, innovative, receptive and perceptive and responsiveness key to survival Comfort in structure, passing control to others, single purpose, local adaptability not encouraged, ‘family’ 5. The foundations of a resilient career
  31. 31. 5. The foundations of a resilient career • As an employee, start thinking of your career as your business. For the most part, you have one client. That client is called your employer, and hopefully that employer is your employer of choice, not necessity. • Investing in your most important lifelong income generating asset, that being your career, makes good sense. – Employers are not intrinsically concerned about the long term wellbeing of your career, as their shareholders are not your personal shareholders.
  32. 32. 5. The foundations of a resilient career • By treating your career as your business, you will progressively equip yourself with the skills that extend far beyond just doing a great job where you are currently employed. • It is the gradual and systematic development and acquisition of complementary and supplementary skills and experience that are in line with the goals and objectives embodied in your Career’s Business Plan that will contribute to you having options. It is having options that leads to career resilience
  33. 33. 6. Masterclass exercise In attempting to apply a dab of rigour to important career decisions it is helpful to distinguish between a hypothesis and an assumption as well as fundamental errors in logic. What’s the difference between a hypothesis and an assumption? A hypothesis is intended to explain certain facts or observations. Often expressed in the form of an “If ….. then” statement. • If you smoke, you will eventually get cancer. • If you drive fast you are more likely to have an accident. An assumption is a hypothesis that is assumed to be true • I assume that my marriage will last a lifetime. • I assume that my boss is angry because of something I did.
  34. 34. 6. Masterclass exercise Consider the following statements in the context of a career. Can you pick the assumptions, hypotheses or possible logic errors? 1. If I studied for a reputable MBA degree, I will more than recoup the cost and effort with a better paid job in less than 3 years through a higher salary. 2. If I succeed in my current job, I’ll be able to easily get work elsewhere because I’ll have a glowing resume. 3. If I work hard and always comply with my manager’s instructions, I will eventually be promoted. 4. Others just know how valuable I am to the organisation. 5. I plan to gain a lot of industry knowledge – that’s my guarantee of always getting a well paid job in my industry.
  35. 35. 6. Masterclass exercise Consider the following statements in the context of a career. Can you pick the assumptions, hypotheses or possible logic errors? 6. I work for a major, successful multinational. There are plenty of opportunities for me here. 7. My technical skills will sustain my career in the long term 8. My industry is unlikely to change much – it’s been around a long time and is considered an essential service. 9. If I work long hours I will eventually expect to be rewarded (e.g. increased pay, promotion, bigger office). 10. Other jobs will not be as good as the one I currently have in today’s difficult environment. 11. I have to be more active in work ‘politics’ to get ahead.
  36. 36. 7. Wrap-up and conclusions Organisations are: • Complex • Many interactions are poorly understood • Mostly focused on the short term • Like a ‘living thing’ Your career is your responsibility: • Consciously invest in our career – it’s your most valuable asset.
  37. 37. ThankYou! ROB LIVINGSTONE - Fellow, University of Technology, Sydney - Principal, Rob Livingstone Advisory Pty Ltd W: www.rob-livingstone.com E: rob@rob-livingstone.com P: +61 2 8005 1972 M: +61 419 632 673 F: +61 2 9879 5004 Tw: @rladvisory Now on Paperback iPad Kindle Now available from rob-livingstone.com and Amazon © All rights reserved. Rob Livingstone Advisory Pty Ltd. Unauthorized redistribution prohibited without prior approval. ‘

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