Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Upcoming SlideShare
Suicide Ideation Among First Responders
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

0

Share

Download to read offline

Best Practices for Responding to a Campus Suicide

Download to read offline

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

Best Practices for Responding to a Campus Suicide

  1. 1. Best Practices Suicide on College Campuses Meghan Campbell Constance Carmona Gissel Rivera Rachel Seavey Courtney Struble
  2. 2. Statistics • More than 1,000 students on campus commit suicide each year • Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students • 8 – 15% of students attempt suicide in the United States • 5% of students report making a suicide attempt annually • Only 23% of students who died by suicide were seen by their college counseling centers • Gender Paradox
  3. 3. Suicide Cases in 2012 April 2012 • Boston University Graduate Student • Suffolk University Senior • Harvard University Senior May 2012 • Boston College Sophomore June 2012 • Amherst College Freshman December 2012 • American International College Freshman
  4. 4. Landmark Legislation • Garrett Lee Smith Act Notable Prevention Efforts • JED • Campus Suicide Prevention Program Recent Recommendations • Recommendations for reporting on suicide • Return of “in loco parentis” Issues with Past Practices • Self Reporting • Social Stigma • Gap Between Perception and Reality
  5. 5. Risk Factors & Warning Signs • Psychiatric Disorders • Past History of Attempted Suicide • Genetic Predisposition • Neurotransmitters • Impulsivity • Suicide Crisis • Precipitating Event • Intense Affective State • Changes in Behavior Observable Signs of Serious Depression: • Unrelenting Low Mood • Pessimism • Hopelessness • Desperation • Anxiety • Inner Tension • Withdrawal • Sleep Problems • Increased Alcohol and/or Drug Use • Recent Impulsiveness • Threatening suicide • Expressing a Strong Will to Die • Making a Plan • Unexpected Rage or Anger
  6. 6. • Increased risk of depression, PTSD, & drop out rates • Negative PR • Suicide Ideation • Suicide Contagion
  7. 7. Suicide Ideation Ideation is a broad term ranging from thoughts of suicide to unsuccessful attempts. 1 in 12 students has made a suicide plan, and approximately 24,000 suicide attempts occur annually among U.S. college students Signs of ideation : Arnold Lazarus’s BASIC ID model • Behaviors • Affect • Sensation • Imagery • Cognitions • Interpersonal Relationships • Drugs or Biology
  8. 8. Suicide Contagion “Suicidal behavior by additional people that is influenced by a previous attempt or completion.”
  9. 9. On average 1 suicide affects 6 lives *However, this number drastically increases when a suicide occurs on a campus.
  10. 10. Suicide Contagion Example: St. Clair High School in Missouri As of November 15, 2012 there had been 3 student suicides in 7 weeks.
  11. 11. Best Practices for a Campus: Preventing Contagion • Implement a Death Response Team (DRT) • Notify “suicide victims” (those individuals directly connected to the deceased) • Address student body/community as a whole, dispel myths & rumors. • Discuss suicide as a byproduct of mental illness and depression.
  12. 12. The 2007 Award winning campaign created by the University of California, Irvine and A Better World Advertising.
  13. 13. Providing Resources • Accessibility • Addresses the whole student population (i.e., LGBT and Veterans) • Screenings and services to detect student pre-suicide attempt • Innovative ways to reach the high risk students Example: ETSU PEAKS BU Secrets
  14. 14. Boston University: Revealing Secrets Can Help Students
  15. 15. Importance of Mental Health Services • Poor mental health can have negative effects on a student’s ability to perform well academically (ACHA, 2011) • College students are the largest uninsured group (ACHA, 2011) • Most insurances provide little to no benefits for mental health and substance abuse (ACHA, 2011) • Reduce the number of students suffering from depression or other mental crises • Connect the institution to “troubled” students • Relay services and initiatives steered towards helping students at risk
  16. 16. Conclusion
  17. 17. References • ACHA. (2011). Accredited student health services - aaahc and the joint commission. American College Health Association, Retrieved from www.acha.org/Topics/docs/Accredited_Student_Health_Services.pdf • Levine, H. (2008). Suicide and its impact on campus. New Directions for Student Services, (121), 63-76. • Nicoletti, J., Spencer-Thomas, S., Bollinger, C. (2010). Violence Goes to College: The Authoritative Guide to Prevention and Intervention 2nd Edition. Springfield, Illinois: Charles C Thomas Publisher, LTD. • Warren, L.(2012)Three Students at St Clair High School in Missouri Have killed Themselves in Seven Weeks. USA Prepares: November 15, 2012. Retrieved from: http://www.usaprepares.com/health/three-students-at-st-clair-high-school-in-missouri-have- killed- themselves-in-seven-weeks • Hirsh, J.K. & Barton A.L. (2011). Positive social support, Negative social exchanges, and suicidal behavior in college students. Journal of American College Health 59(5), 393 – 398. • Cukrowicz, K.C., Schlegel, E.F., Smith, P.N., Jacobs, M.P., Van Orden, K.A., Paukert, A.L., Pettit, J.W. & Joiner, T.E. (2011). Suicide ideation among college students evidencing subclinical depression. Journal of American College Health 59(7), 575-581.

Views

Total views

283

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

22

Actions

Downloads

6

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×