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One hectare feasibility study with forward

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One hectare feasibility study with forward

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One hectare feasibility study with forward

  1. 1. a | P a g e A RUT
  2. 2. b | P a g e
  3. 3. c | P a g e
  4. 4. d | P a g e
  5. 5. e | P a g e
  6. 6. 1 | P a g e CONTENT S. NO. TOPIC PAGE 1. Introduction 2– 18 2. 1 Hectare Project 19 – 23 3. Initial Planning 24 – 25 4. Live fencing plantation, Cost & Income 25 – 34 5. Biomass + Crop - Sowing & Harvesting Plan 35 – 180 6. Plantation of Long life trees 181 – 184 7. Comparative study on nutritional values of products 185 – 187 8. Amrut Jal 188 – 190 9. Amrut Mitti 191 – 196 10. Government Support- through Policies 197 – 198 11. Acknowledgement 199
  7. 7. 2 | P a g e INTRODUCTION Around 70% of producers (farmers, tribals on forest land etc.) population in India comes under the category of small (19%) and marginal (51%) farmers. These categories of farmers have land holding of around 1 hectare and implementing existing policies to allot Govt. land to them (Booklet no. 434, Agricultural situation in India: ASIS-6). This population is mostly, poor, hungry, malnourished, illiterate, isolated, deep in debt, having lost their knowledge to follow their agro-ecology, having fallen into global investment in the market oriented development research, with extension focused on adapting and converting to high cost, high risk green revolution/Biotechnologies systems. This is the cause of their distress and the agrarian crisis in India. So, if we want our agriculture to again contribute significantly to the development and growth by becoming sustainable in the long term, we need to assist/facilitate by meeting the needs of the producer community so that they once again follow their producer oriented, low cost, low risk, agro ecology, primarily to meet their nutrition, food and cash requirements as this is the target population (mostly women and youth) that has capabilities and if given proper resources to develop their capacities. A Farmer is not just responsible for the food and agricultural products to the nation but also responsible for managing and guarding the environmental conditions on a scale far beyond the capabilities and reach of the Government. Following the Agro ecology (culture) is essential in improving conditions of air, water and soil. All these years we have seen how the huge Government investments in external input based, high cost high risk market oriented conventional research & development (Green revolution/ BT) agriculture systems have affected environment and biodiversity, resulting in climate change, reducing soil carbon, natural resources, access to own requirements of nutritious food, net incomes & purchasing power, health and increasing numbers committing suicide year on year. Our mother earth is affected by Global Warming and the temperatureof the earth isincreasing by2 degrees in the comingyears.Soil is getting hard and no longer fertile because of the increasing use of agro chemicals every year but for the same or lower yields. Nutritional Value of the crops has declined with conventional crops’ water intake also increasing each year along with causing malnutrition/health related problems. Market oriented development of hybrid seeds in horticulture has increased in size and yield but at the cost of safety, taste and nutrition. Following table shows decline of nutritional value of some vegetables.
  8. 8. 3 | P a g e Table A: Decline of Mineral Content in few Vegetables, 1914-1992 (Per 100 Grams) Minerals 1914 1948 (Average) 1992 Cabbage Calcium 248.00 mg 38.75 mg 47.00 mg Magnesium 66.00 mg 29.60 mg 15.00 mg Iron 1.50 mg 5.70 mg 0.59 mg Lettuce Calcium 265.50 mg 38.50 mg 19.00 mg Magnesium 112.00 mg 31.20 mg 9.00 mg Iron 94.00 mg 26.25 mg 10.50 mg Spinach Calcium 227.30 mg 71.75 mg 99.00 mg Magnesium 122.00 mg 125.40 mg 79.00 mg Iron 64.00 mg 80.15 mg 2.70 mg Source:TheHealingPowerofMineralsbyPaulBergner,PrimaPublishing1997 As one can observe from theabovefigures, how we are experiencing a dramatic loss in our essential and vital nutrients that keep us healthy. This loss arises from the erosion and mineral loss inherent in year after year of tilling and monoculture. It is imperative that we implement schemestorevitalizeoursoil andplantsandtherebystrengthen the plants to withstand climate change, stabilize production and ensure long term sustainability and our health. Many serious diseases have broken out in last few years and the condition is getting worse year after year. The food which we are eating today is not nutritious and or enough (access) to fulfill the body requirement, thus nutrition through agro ecology (not supplements) shouldbemajorfocusofagriculture in the future. After a few years when we think over this issue, there will be no option to go back. At that time situations will be irreversible and the world will face considerable number of deaths due to malnutrition. So,properstepshavetobetakennowsothatwe cansecurethisearthforourfuture generations. Government investment to meet the needs of producer communities to follow their agro ecology putsthem (mostly women and youth employment opportunities) back to work gainfully, ensures their access to own requirements of safe nutritious food and cash, coming out of the agrarian crisis, mitigating climate change (CC), could meet the sustainable development goals (SDGs), contributes to economic development and growth. Agro ecology:
  9. 9. 4 | P a g e 0 1. Enables the producers to use their bio mass and animal droppings to produce inputs on farm assured supply of water by increasing the water table, rain water harvesting technique at individual farm level etc.. This minimizes the consumption of energy on f arms. 2. Absence of agro chemicals in farmingensureshighlevel ofenergy inthefoodandthus there is little chance of pest attack. 3. Producer’s access to safe, good quality harvest of nutritious crops which ensures long term sustainability as the soil health (carbon) improves. Requiring reduced quantities of inputs and water, producing own quality modern seeds, maintaining farm production (low cost low risk), thus ensuring improved livelihoods, net incomes and long term sustainability whilst reducing hunger, poverty, mal nutrition, effects of climate change and Following agro ecology creates a micro climate that can help in reduction in temperature in the farm area. Biomass fencing helps in maintainingthemicroclimate, reducing the effects and adapting to climate change, with ongoing research and development, season after season, thus managing to ensure sustainable farm production for meeting own and communities’ requirements of increasing food, nutrition and cash. Natuecoscienceisthesolutiontowardtheseproblems. Itcanbehelpfulinsolvingthree majorproblems: 1) It encourages the farmers to use their farm inputs like assured supply of water, rain water harvesting technique at individual level etc. that reduce the unnecessary consumption of energyintheproductionoffoodgrains. 2) Foodprepared inNatuecofarmingcontainshighvitalenergy,asthereisno application ofany kindofpesticide.Ifthefoodisenergizedproperlythen thereisnochanceofanypestattack. 3) Natueco science uses all the inputs of farming from the farmer's field only, so there is no external farming input cost incurred to the farmers. Farmers get good and healthy harvest of crops which canhelphimgettingprosperityandhappinessthroughoutthelife.Povertymainlyoccursdue to the lack of adequate land and high input costs, while Natueco provides a way to produce enough food for a family of five members in a very small land (even quarter acre of area), and with a minimum input used.Soitcanbeagoodsolutionfortheeradicationofpoverty. Further to this, Natueco farm creates a micro climate that can help in reducing the farm temperatureupto3 degrees inthefarmarea.Livefencing helps in controlling the heavywind speed that can increase temperature in the area, and the plant canopy of live fencing crops helps in maintaining themicroclimate. So, adoption of this farming technique can save the world from several future problems. It can alsoprovide the nutrients which are requiredbythegrowingpopulationofthisworld.
  10. 10. 5 | P a g e Success Stories of Natueco Farming 50 years old tree converted into 5 years young with more productivity
  11. 11. 6 | P a g e Millet: Jowar (17 ft height) Mousambi: 1 quintal/tree/year
  12. 12. 7 | P a g e 400 Coconut/ tree / year
  13. 13. 8 | P a g e Banana 45-52 Kg.
  14. 14. 9 | P a g e Papaya: 150 kg/tree/year Tomato: 120 tons/Acre /year Water Chesnut: 100 tons/Acre /year Pumpkin: 32-50 kg
  15. 15. 10 | P a g e Turmeric: 20 Tons/ Acre
  16. 16. 11 | P a g e Wheat: 30 Quintals/acre
  17. 17. 12 | P a g e Tuar Dal: 7 kg/plant
  18. 18. 13 | P a g e Sugarcane 100 Ton/Acre
  19. 19. 14 | P a g e Drumstick Groundnut: 24 Quintals /acre
  20. 20. 15 | P a g e Dates: 400 kg/plant
  21. 21. 16 | P a g e Pomegranate
  22. 22. 17 | P a g e Terrace Farming
  23. 23. 18 | P a g e Man-made Productive Bio diversity
  24. 24. 19 | P a g e 1 Hectare Project Around 70% of small and marginal producers have land holding of around 1 hectare. With Government making the required investments to meet the needs of these producers, providing assistance by putting in place the required mandates to work with / along these producer communities and not against, providing knowledge, modern skills and tools, creating capacity to manage their agro ecology. One hectare land and required resources is sufficient for a family to be sustainable in the long term whilst enriching the soil carbon biodiversity and the environment. 1 hectare project is designed to give farmer a ready blueprint to manage his land and resources efficiently along with getting surplus marketable farm produce as well as alternate sources of income in the form of eco-tourism and with value addition to increase shelf life of produce thereby minimize post-harvest losses. This document will be helpful to the producer communities’ individual holding of about 1 hectare of land. Fig. A: One Hectare Plan Overview
  25. 25. 20 | P a g e Model Highlights  Trenches on all sides of the farm in order to increase the water table of the area.  Ponds within the farm that is sufficient for supplying water needs all through the year.  Well-built pathways inside the farm for convenient commute within the farm even during rainy seasons.  Live fencing around and within the farm to improve the microclimate and provide necessary shade to minimize evaporation.  Multi-tier plantation for harnessing maximum sunlight. For some plants/trees require direct sunlight and for some filtered sunlight is sufficient for growth and production. The idea is to manage canopy of every plant/tree in such a way that there is maximum utilization of available sunlight.  Amrut Jal line passing through the farm for efficient dispersal of it and also can be used for water dispersal.  Provision for eco-tourism in order to generate income apart from farm produce. Assumptions:In order to start working on a 1 Hectare model, we are assuming thefollowingsituations:  Whole field (1 hectare) has been cultivated with chemical farming till date.  Has average rainfall condition in the area.  Government is ready to fund initial required investment for setting up the basic infrastructure required as per the plan.  Producers in possession of this 1 hectare land is less educated, requires knowledge and skills development to follow their agro ecology This model emphasizes on Shifting of agriculture from ‘input intensive mindset & practices’ to a robust, highly productive, holistic, self-organizing, de-centralized, locally managed, high-tech, precise system in partnership with Nature. Ground on which this model claim for assured yield and income:  This model ensures availability of required water at farm itself, no need to be dependent on external source.  Effect of global warming is mitigated as precaution taken in advance by live fencing. It will reduce the inside temperature by 4-5 deg C.  At present, farmers are following mono or bi-cropping system, they are selling produces at wholesale rate and buying produces at retail rate. This model fulfills all the consumption requirement of farmers first, and then surplus only to be sold in local or distant market.  Eco-tourism centre in this model will provide farmers not only additional income, but also an alternative market which would give right & retail price to agro produces.
  26. 26. 21 | P a g e Overview of Activities The whole concept of 1 hectare model is based on implementation of various techniques of Natueco Farming. Activities overview and its economics are tabulated below. Activities (1st Year) Months 1st 4th 5th 8th 9th 11th 12th Total Biomass Sowing Schedule R-1 R-2 R-3 Area (sqm) 5948 5648 4992 16588 Cost (Rs) 8875 7511 9065 25451 Biomass Cutting Schedule R-1 R-2 R-3 Income (Rs) 43896 52509 33157 129562 AM Heap Making Schedule R-1 R-2 No. of heaps 47 42 89 Cost (Rs) 11750 10500 22250 Crop Sowing on AM Schedule R-1 Area (sqm) 416.5 416.5 Cost (Rs) 2138 2138 Crop Harvesting Schedule Income (Rs) Activities (2nd Year) Months 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th Total Biomass Sowing Schedule R-4 R-5 R-6 Area (sqm) 4356 3844 3519 11719 Cost (Rs) 9162 8814 6743 24719 Biomass Cutting Schedule R-4 R-5 R-6 Income (Rs) 28385 31719 18130 78234 AM Heap Making Schedule R-3 R-4 R-5 No. of heaps 87 31 73 191 Cost (Rs) 56550 20150 47450 124150 Crop Sowing on AM Schedule R-1.1 R-2 R-2.1 R-3 R-3.1 R-4 Area (sqm) 166.8 366 465.5 563.5 439.2 396.3 2397.3 Cost (Rs) 197 643 299 3675 389 792 5995 Crop Harvesting Schedule R-1 R-2 R-3 Income (Rs) 21300 103715 88869 213884
  27. 27. 22 | P a g e Activities (3rd Year) Months 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd 34th 35th 36th Total Biomass Sowing Schedule R-7 R-8 R-9 Area (sqm) 2457 2353 2140 6950 Cost (Rs) 6571 6500 6355 19426 Biomass Cutting Schedule R-7 R-8 R-9 Income (Rs) 17377 15806 14323 47506 AM Heap Making Schedule R-6 R-7 R-8 No. of heaps 72 21 63 156 Cost (Rs) 46800 13650 40950 101400 Crop Sowing on AM Schedule R-4.1 R-5 R-5.1 R-6 R-6.1 R-7 Area (sqm) 609.9 791.6 1220.1 336 1108.9 277.8 4344.3 Cost (Rs) 444 714 5201 7264 245 1097 14965 Crop Harvesting Schedule R-4 R-5 R-6 R-7 Income (Rs) 168531 305806 393200 140820 1008357 Activities (4th Year) Months 37th 38th 39th 40th 41st 42nd 43rd 44th 45th 46th 47th 48th Total Biomass Sowing Schedule R-10 R-11 R-12 Area (sqm) 1930 1204 930 4064 Cost (Rs) 6212 5719 5532 17463 Biomass Cutting Schedule R-10 R-11 R-12 Income (Rs) 8912 6858 6847 22617 AM Heap Making Schedule R-9 R-10 R-11 No. of heaps 54 48 52 154 Cost (Rs) 35100 31200 33800 100100 Crop Sowing on AM Schedule R-7.1 R-8 R-8.1 R-9 R-9.1 R-10 Area (sqm) 1158.4 1805 1547 792.1 1140 274 6716.5 Cost (Rs) 334 558 12461 5134 482 1555 20524 Crop Harvesting Schedule R-8 R-9 R-10 R-11 Income (Rs) 414923 422846 295055 427633 1560457
  28. 28. 23 | P a g e Activities (5th Year) Months 49th 50th 51st 52nd 53rd 54th 55th 56th 57th 58th 59th 60th Total Biomass Sowing Schedule R-13 R-14 Area (sqm) 928 895 1823 Cost (Rs) 5531 5509 11040 Biomass Cutting Schedule R-13 R-14 Income (Rs) 6713 6713 AM Heap Making Schedule R-12 R-13 R-14 No. of heaps 52 10 50 112 Cost (Rs) 33800 6500 32500 72800 Crop Sowing on AM Schedule R-10.1 R-11 R-11.1 R-12 R-12.1 R-13 Area (sqm) 1955.7 1558.4 1218.1 222.4 1275.3 203.4 6433.3 Cost (Rs) 760 2060 17797 3003 696 3055 27371 Crop Harvesting Schedule R-12 R-13 R-14 R-15 Income (Rs 581613 418009 461169 523476 1984267 Activities (6th Year) Months 61st 62nd 63rd 64th 65th 66th 67th 68th 69th 70th Total Biomass Sowing Schedule Area (sqm) Cost (Rs) Biomass Cutting Schedule Income (Rs) AM Heap Making Schedule No. of heaps Cost (Rs) Crop Sowing on AM Schedule R-13.1 R-14 Area (sqm) 1566.4 1040.5 2606.9 Cost (Rs) 1215 3336 4551 Crop Harvesting Schedule R-16 R-17 R-18 Income (Rs) 405139 583460 392850 1381449
  29. 29. 24 | P a g e Initial Planning 1. The allocated land has to be marked as per the plan. Individual preferences as per ‘Vaastu’ can also be taken into consideration to an extent while marking. Also, in case required then area can be fenced outside live fencing marking by barbed wire or other means. Between the barbed wire and trenches there is a gap of 2 feet. And between trenches and outer live fencing there is a gap of 3 feet. 2. The first step after marking the land would be digging up the trenches, pond and well (In case if not available). For digging, we can either use manual labour or we can use JCB machines to complete the task in a short time. The choice would again depend on availability of resources in the area. 3. Each trench (Fig. C) (Total – 169 trenches) is of size 5 x 3 feet and the depth of the trench can be decided as per the average per day rainfall in the area. Considering 1 feet depth and 15 days of rainfall in a month, the trenches will overflow twice in a month. Thus, if we consider 3 months of rainfall then trenches will harvest (27 Litre x 15 Cu. Ft. x 6 x 169) = 4,10,670 Litres of water per season. (1 Cu. Ft. = 27 Litres). 4. The ponds are dug at 15 feet depth and have an all-inclusive surface area of 6,000 Sq. Ft.. This will have total water holding capacity of 24,30,000 Litres of water. This volume, after deducting water at 25% evaporation rate and 120 days of rainy season, it would be sufficient to supply approximately 7,000 litres of water daily to the farm. 5. All the trenches (5 x 3 x 1) have total water holding capacity of 68,445 lit.. Considering the water overflows in these trenches 12 times during entire rainy season we are expecting approx. 80,000 litres of water harvesting capacity. 6. The soil that has been taken out during digging has to be used for “Amrut Mitti” making and pathway development. Pathway development at the start will be helpful in any kind of production loss during the rains and also an aesthetic walk way for the tourists as well as the farmer. 7. After the digging work is completed pathway should be constructed so that there is ease of transportation in the area. 8. ‘Amrut Jal’ tank must be constructed and ‘Amrut Jal’ line should be laid on priority basis so that ‘Amrutjal’ facility becomes operational by the time we start live fencing plantation. 9. In the mean time, cow and fodder shed along with Godown/Store room must be constructed. Cow urine collection can be started and stored for later use (The older the cow urine the better it is). Godown/Store room can be utilized for keeping daily tools and equipments. After completing the above mentioned planning, the next step has to be taken for planting live fencing. In order to do the plantation, ‘Amrut Jal’ tank should be fully operational. The ‘Amrut Jal’ should be prepared in its tank as per the process explained.
  30. 30. 25 | P a g e Fig. C: Trenches and Fencing plan Live Fencing Plantation All these years, in our conventional farming system the fencing area and its planning have always been neglected. For fencing only barbed wires or other traditional, market available methods. The critical aspect of 1 hectare model is its plan for fencing or precisely live fencing. The ‘Live Fencing’ is systematically planned for maximum coverage and provide following benefits; 1. Since the live fencing will be planted on normal soil and only ‘Amrut Jal’ would be utilized, it would help in improving the biodiversity of the surrounding soil as is done in ‘Amrut Mitti’ making process. 2. The live fencing will be helpful in checking strong winds to enter the farm and thus maintaining the desired temperature of the area. 3. Improving microclimate of the area by decreasing the temperature of the surrounding by 3 to 5 degrees. 4. It will also provide the desired biomass for ‘Amrut Mitti’ making and mulching. 5. Most importantly, with above all benefits the fencing will also give marketable produce.
  31. 31. 26 | P a g e Fig. A: Canopy Management / Multi-tier Concept B = Bamboo D= Drumsticks G = Gliricidia V = Vettiver M = Mogra A = Ambadi P = Papaya L = Lemon Grass T = Tulsi E = Aloe Vera = Banana = Phudina = Adrusi There are two types in live fencing as per the plan; 1) Outer (Fig. D) – This is on the periphery marking the outer boundary of the farm. The outer fencing plan shown in the picture depicts 10 x 5 Feet chunk of the land. This same plan has to be replicated for entire periphery of the area. The plantation is done in multi-tier system and care is taken that every plant row gets maximum sunlight. Conventionally, farmer use to cut the trees on the boundary of the farm in order to avoid the shade of the trees on the crops. But, as per this model the issue is taken care planting the tallest trees on outside. So, at any point of the day the tree shade gets 11 feet width (5 feet of fencing + 6 feet of the pathway). Therefore, no tree shade falls on the crops grown. And, the plants grown below are chosen such that they can grow easily under these taller trees. The trees and plants selected for fencing have certain specialities;
  32. 32. 27 | P a g e Fig. D Outer Fencing Plan 1. Bamboo – The produce from Bamboo tress can be utilized in constructing house and cottages. 2. Vettiver – These can easily grow in the shade of taller trees. Also helpful in checking soil erosion. 3. Drumstick – Helpful in Nitrogen fixation in the soil and gives good marketable produce. 4. Mogra – Can easily grow in the shade and it will make the air entering the farm fragrant to give a pleasant feel. 5. Gliricidia – Important leguminous tree, can be grown easily, helps in keeping rats away from the farm and gives good supply of biomass. 6. Ambadi – Has medicinal uses. 7. Tulsi - Is a medicinal plant of great value. 8. Aloe Vera – Can easily grow under the shade without much care. Also, an important plant with medicinal values. 9. Papaya – Starts fruiting in 6 months and can be easily marketed. 10. Lemon Grass – Has good medicinal value and can be used in preparation of herbal tea at home. 11. Banana – Easily marketable fruit for any season. 12. Adrusi – Holds important medicinal values and termed as the first plant in Ayurveda. 13. Phudina – Can be easily grown to cover the surface that is left between the plants and grows well in shade. Daily usage in food as well medicinal importance. 14. Dhencha – Good for Nitrogen fixation and gives good quality fodder for the cattle.
  33. 33. 28 | P a g e As per plan there are 5 rows of plantation done. The outermost row contains 2 bamboo plants at 10 feet distance. The middle row contains 2 papaya plants at 10 feet distance and the innermost row contains 2 lemon grass plants at 10 feet distance. In between these 2 plants of each row, other plants are planted at fixed distance as shown in the plan. Due care is taken while planning that the shade of the tallest tree falls only on the fencing area and pathways. This way it doesn’t disturb the crops planted inside the farm and the tourists and farmers can easily walk under the shade during summers. Smaller medicinal plants and shrubs have been planted on the pathway side so that the farm vehicles can move easily without obstruction from big trees. 2) Inner (Fig. E) – This is on the inside dividing the farm into parts. Fig. E Inner Fencing Plan Similar to outer fencing plan the inner fencing plan shown is a chunk of 10 x 5 feet which is to be replicated for the entire inner boundary which is shown in the map. The outer row has 2 Singapore cherry planted at 10 feet distance, the middle row has 2 Kadi patta at 10 feet distance and the inner row has 2 Ambadi at 10 feet distance. The plantation done here serves the purpose of providing necessary shade on the pathway, flowers for aesthetic value and some fruits for tourists to enjoy while walking on the pathway.
  34. 34. 29 | P a g e There are two rows of inner fencing on either side of 4 feet pathways. The outer rows of inner fencing face towards the 4 feet pathway or the pathway between two inner fences. This is planned in order to give a complete green cover to the pathway. The inner rows of the inner fence face towards the wider pathways on both sides. This is again done so that the farm vehicles can easily commute without any disturbance. The inner fencing plants were also selected based on their special characteristics; 1. Singapore Cherry – It is the favourite fruit of birds so it will attract bird population in the farm and in turn help in pollination. The fruit is also edible for humans. 2. Mulberry – Gives good fruits for tourist to taste while walking on the pathway. 3. Jatropa – Can be used to generate fuel. 4. Gulab – Beautification of the farm, good fragrance and marketable produce in the form of Gulkand. 5. Zendu – Beautification of the farm and also helpful in Nitrogen fixation. 6. Ajwaine – Has medicinal values. All above mentioned plantation for outer as well as inner fencing is done on normal soil using ‘Amrut Jal’. Approximately, 1 litre ‘Amrutjal’ is required per square feet of plantation. The details of plants required for fencing along with its cost is given in Table B. The income that can be generated from live fencing during initial 4 years of establishing farm is given in tables C, D, E & F.
  35. 35. 30 | P a g e Table B: Outer & Inner Fencing Plantation Quantity & Cost Plant Quantity Rate Cost (Rs) Planting dist.(ft.) Note: The number of Pudina plants may vary slightly depending on the area to be covered. Bamboo Cluster 136 5 680 5' Drumstick 132 5 660 10' Gliricidia 141 5 705 5' Singapore Cherry 72 25 1,800 10' Mulberry 68 10 680 10' Jatropa 68 5 340 5' Mogra 209 5 1,045 5' Banana Clusters 405 10 4,050 5' Lemon Grass 951 5 4,755 10' Meetha Neem/ Kadi Patha 72 5 360 10' Papaya 199 10 1,990 10' Ardusi 133 5 665 10’ Zendu 140 1 140 2' Ambadi 274 5 1,370 10' Tulsi 680 5 3,400 2’ Ajwaine 68 0.25 17 10' African Dhencha-Shevri 133 0.25 33 10' Aloe Vera 478 5 2,390 5' Pudina 746 2 1,492 - Vettiver Grass 686 0.5 343 3' Deshi Gulab 204 5 1,020 2’ Total 5,995 27,935
  36. 36. 31 | P a g e Table C: 1st Year Income from Live Fencing 1st Year Live Fencing Income ThequantityofPudhinarepresentsthetotalAreainSq.Ft.thatitwillbeplanted. Sr. No. Name Of Tree Number of Plants Period of first yield (Months) Yield per Year (Pcs / Kg.) Selling price (Pcs / Kg.) Month of Pruning Biomass per year Selling price of biomass Income Harvest Biomass (Rs.) (Kg.) 1 Bamboo Cluster 136 36 0 100 - 0 ForField 0 0 2 Drumstick 132 6 10 Kg (Sticks) 10 12th 20 13,200 2,6401 Kg (Seed) 2000 264,000 3 Kg (Leaves) 50 19,800 3 Gliricidia 141 36 0 0 12th 20 0 2,820 0 500 0 4 Singapore Cherry 72 - 0 0 12th 10 0 720 5 Mulberry 68 12 1 10 12th 20 680 1,360 6 Jatropa 68 - 0 0 12th 10 0 680 7 Mogra 209 12 0.25 100 - 0 5,225 0 8 Banana Cluster 405 13 0 10 - 0 0 0 9 Lemon Grass 951 6 2 20 - 0 38,040 0 10 Kadhi Patha 72 12 5 10 - 0 3,600 0 11 Papaya 199 12 35 Kg ( Fruit ) 10 - 0 69,650 0 0.25 Kg (Seed) 5000 248,750 12 Ardusi 133 12 2 10 12th 5 2,660 665 13 Zendu 140 6 0.5 10 12th 0.5 700 70 14 Ambadi 274 6 0.1 100 12th 1 2,740 274 15 Tulsi 680 3 0.5 20 - 0 6,800 0 16 Ajwain 68 3 0.05 20 - 0 68 0 17 African Dhencha-Shevri 133 12 0.025 20 12th 0.25 67 33 18 Aloe Vera 478 6 3 10 - 0 14,340 0 19 Pudhina 746 12 0.1 50 - 0 3,730 0 20 Vetiver Grass 686 12 100 Slips 0.25 12th 3 17,150 2,058 21 Gulab 204 12 20 1 - 0 4,080 0 Total 5,995 7,15,280 11,320
  37. 37. 32 | P a g e Table D: 2nd Year Income from Live Fencing 2nd Year Live Fencing Income Sr. No. Name Of Tree Number of Plants Period of first yield (Months) Yield per Year (Pcs / Kg.) Selling price (Pcs / Kg.) Month of Pruning Biomass per year Selling price of biomass Total Income 2nd Year Harvest Biomass (Rs.) (Kg.) 1 Bamboo Cluster 136 36 0 100 - 0 ForField 0 0 2 Drumstick 132 6 10 Kg (Sticks) 10 6th & 12th 40 13,200 5,2801 Kg (Seed) 2000 2,64,000 5 Kg (Leaves) 50 33,000 3 Gliricidia 141 36 0 0 6th & 12th 40 0 5,640 0 500 0 4 Singapore Cherry 72 - 0 0 6th & 12th 20 0 1,440 5 Mulberry 68 12 1 10 6th & 12th 30 680 2,040 6 Jatropa 68 - 0 0 6th & 12th 20 0 1,360 7 Mogra 209 12 0.25 100 - 0 5,225 0 8 Banana Cluster 405 13 30 10 1st & 7th 150 1,21,500 60,750 9 Lemon Grass 951 6 4 20 - 0 76,080 0 10 Kadi Patha 72 12 5 10 - 0 3,600 0 11 Papaya 199 12 50 Kg ( Fruit ) 10 - 0 99,500 0 0.40 Kg (Seed) 5000 3,98,000 12 Ardusi 133 12 2 10 6th & 12th 5 2,660 665 13 Zendu 140 6 0.5 10 12th 0.5 700 70 14 Ambadi 274 6 0.1 100 12th 1 2,740 274 15 Tulsi 680 3 0.5 20 - 0 6,800 0 16 Ajwain 68 3 0.05 20 - 0 68 0 17 African Dhencha-Shevri 133 12 0.025 20 12th 0.25 67 33 18 Aloe Vera 478 6 3 10 - 0 14,340 0 19 Pudhina 746 12 0.1 50 - 0 3,730 0 20 Vetiver Grass 686 12 100 Slips 0.25 12th 3 17,150 2,058 21 Gulab 204 12 20 1 - 0 4,080 0 Total 5,995 10,67,120 79,610
  38. 38. 33 | P a g e Table E: 3rd Year Income from Live Fencing 3rd Year Live Fencing Income Note:Byendof2.5yearswewillhavetosownewseedsofpapayatotakethecontinuous yieldofit. Sr. No. Name Of Tree Number of Plants Period of first yield (Months) Yield per Year (Pcs / Kg.) Selling price (Pcs / Kg.) Month of Pruning Biomass per year Selling price of biomass Total Income 3rd Year Harvest (Rs.) Biomass (Kg.) 1 Bamboo Cluster 136 36 10 100 12th 5 ForField 1,36,000 680 2 Drumstick 132 6 10 Kg (Sticks) 10 6th & 12th 50 13,200 6,6001 Kg (Seed) 2000 2,64,000 5 Kg (Leaves) 50 33,000 3 Gliricidia 141 36 0 0 4th, 8th & 12th 50 0 7,050 0.05 (Seed) 500 0 3,525 4 Singapore Cherry 72 - 0 0 6th & 12th 40 0 2,880 5 Mulberry 68 12 1 10 6th & 12th 40 680 2,720 6 Jatropa 68 - 0 0 4th, 8th & 12th 30 0 2,040 7 Mogra 209 12 0.25 100 - 0 5,225 0 8 Banana Cluster 405 13 30 10 1st & 7th 150 1,21,500 60,750 9 Lemon Grass 951 6 2 20 - 0 38,040 0 10 Kadi Patha 72 12 5 10 - 0 3,600 0 11 Papaya 199 12 50 Kg ( Fruit ) 10 12th 80 99,500 15,920 0.40 Kg (Seed) 5000 3,98,000 12 Ardusi 133 12 2 10 4th, 8th & 12th 5 2,660 665 13 Zendu 140 6 0.5 10 12th 0.5 700 70 14 Ambadi 274 6 0.1 100 12th 1 2,740 274 15 Tulsi 680 3 0.5 20 - 0 6,800 0 16 Ajwaine 68 3 0.05 20 - 0 68 0 17 African Dhencha-Shevri 133 12 0.025 20 12th 0.25 67 33 18 Aloe Vera 478 6 3 10 - 0 14,340 0 19 Pudhina 746 12 0.1 50 - 0 3,730 0 20 Vettiver Grass 686 12 100 Slips 0.25 12th 3 17,150 2,058 21 Gulab 204 12 20 1 - 0 4,080 0 Total 5,995 11,68,605 1,01,740
  39. 39. 34 | P a g e Table F: 4th Year Onwards Income from Live Fencing 4th Year Onwards Live Fencing Income Sr. No. Name Of Tree Number of Plants Period of first yield (Months) Yield per Year (Pcs / Kg.) Selling price (Pcs / Kg.) Month of Pruning Biomass per year Selling price of biomass Total Income Harvest Biomass (Rs.) (Kg.) 1 Bamboo Cluster 136 36 10 100 12th 5 ForField 1,36,000 680 2 Drumstick 132 6 10 Kg (Sticks) 10 6th & 12th 50 13,200 6,6001 Kg (Seed) 2000 2,64,000 5 Kg (Leaves) 50 33,000 3 Gliricidia 141 36 0 0 4th, 8th & 12th 50 0 7,050 0.05 500 3,525 4 Singapore Cherry 72 - 0 0 6th & 12th 40 0 2,880 5 Mulberry 68 12 1 10 6th & 12th 20 680 1,360 6 Jatropa 68 - 0 0 4th, 8th & 12th 30 0 2,040 7 Mogra 209 12 0.25 100 - 0 5,225 0 8 Banana Cluster 405 13 30 10 1st & 7th 150 1,21,500 60,750 9 Lemon Grass 951 6 2 20 - 0 38,040 0 10 Kadi Patha 72 12 5 10 - 0 3,600 0 11 Papaya 199 12 50 Kg ( Fruit ) 10 - 0 99,500 0 0.4 Kg (Seed) 5000 3,98,000 12 Ardusi 133 12 2 10 4th, 8th & 12th 5 2,660 665 13 Zendu 140 6 0.5 10 12th 0.5 700 70 14 Ambadi 274 6 0.1 100 12th 1 2,740 274 15 Tulsi 680 3 0.5 20 - 0 6,800 0 16 Ajwain 68 3 0.05 20 - 0 68 0 17 African Dhencha-Shevri 133 12 0.025 20 12th 0.25 67 33 18 Aloe Vera 478 6 3 10 - 0 14,340 0 19 Pudhina 746 12 0.1 50 - 0 3,730 0 20 Vetiver Grass 686 12 100 Slips 0.25 12th 3 17,150 2,058 21 Gulab 204 12 20 1 - 0 4,080 0 Total 5,995 11,68,605 84,460
  40. 40. 35 | P a g e 1st Round of Biomass Sowing (Table 1, Fig. 1) As mentioned earlier, the live fencing is planted on normal soil using ‘Amrut Jal’. But, for other plantation/crops ‘Amrut Mitti’ has to be prepared on large scale. The most important input to prepare ‘Amrut Mitti’ is biomass in abundant quantity. This biomass will be grown in the farm itself. A model plan to grow biomass and preparation of Amrut Mitti is given in following paragraphs. The Eco tourism shall be developed at a later stage, after the farm has come up to certain level. After dedicating land for house, well, tank for Amrut Jal, Pond, Live fencing, Cow and Fodder shed, Godown & Pathways, the land measuring 5948 Sq. Mt. is available for growing biomass in the first round, which includes 100 Sq. Mt. of space meant for cottages (Eco tourism). Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha canbesowninequal parts/ area of land. C4 variety of Maize is selected, as it start flowering earliest and provides fibre to the soil, Mustard provides lignin, while Dhainchahelpsinfixation of Nitrogen,itprovidesfibreandlignin also. Seeds can be broadcasted manually or by using tractor. Sowing will take 10 days if carried out manually by 1 person or 2 hours by Tractor. Both will cost the same. From sowing to harvest, the Amrut Jal will be required 4 times @ 1 Litre per Square Meter (per 10 Square Feet) each. The quantity and cost of sowing biomass is given in Table 1. Further it is mentioned that one 5 HP motor / pump-set would be sufficient for irrigation. Table 1 1st Round of Biomass Sowing ( 1st Month ) 1.36 Acre (5948 Sq. Mt.) Crop Planting Seeds Req. for Rate AmountDistance 1000 Sq. Mt. 5948 Sq. Mt. (Sq. Ft.) (Kg.) Maize To Be Broadcasted 4.60 27 30 810 Mustard 0.69 4 40 200 Dhaincha 0.69 4 30 150 Labor (sowing) 10 Days or 2 Hrs. by Tractor 200 / day or 1000 / Hrs. 2,000 Irrigation 5 HP Motor Rs.5000 / Year 1,670 Labor (harvesting) By Our Fixed Labor 0 Amrut Jal 1 Ltr. / Sq. Mt. * 4 Times (At Time of Sowing & on 15th, 30th & 45th Day) Rs.0.17 / Ltr. 4,045 Total Cost. ( A ) 8,875
  41. 41. 36 | P a g e Biomass + Crop - Sowing & Harvesting Plan Figure 1 1st Round of Biomass Cutting (Table 2, Fig. 2) • The biomass will start flowering after 63 days. Further it is mentioned that the biomass will not be cut or chopped during these 63 days, rather it will be allowed to grow. • The seeds would start maturing after 3 months and biomass will be harvested by the mid of 4th month. • It will yield 0.25 kg, 0.10 Kg and 0.10 Kg of seeds per square meter each of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha. Therefore 1,487 Kg of Maize, 595 Kg of Mustard and 595 Kg of Dhaincha seeds can be harvested ideally. • Out of the total harvest, 26 Kg., 4 Kg. & 4 Kg. seeds each of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha will be preserved and used in next round of sowing. Remaining seeds can be sold in the market which will generate income as per Table 2 below. • Along with seeds, 29,740 Kg. of green biomass (@ 5 Kg. per square meter) will also be collected and dried. This biomass will be utilized in making Amrut Mitti and mulching.
  42. 42. 37 | P a g e Table 2 1st Round of Biomass Cutting ( Mid 4th Month ) Crop Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Yield Per (Sq. Mt.) in (Kg.) Total Yield Next Biomass Sowing Remaining Seeds Selling Price Total Income (Rs.)Area Seed Required Maize 5,948 0.25 1,487 5648 26 1461 10 14,610 Mustard 0.10 595 4 591 30 17,727 Dhaincha 0.10 595 4 591 20 11,818 Green Biomass from cutting (Kg.) 5 Kg./Sq. Mt. 29,740 44,155 Figure 2
  43. 43. 38 | P a g e 2nd Round of Biomass Sowing (Table 3, Fig. 3) • The 2nd round of biomass will be sown in the 5th month. • Now the area available would be less than the first one, as some area will be utilized for the purpose of making heaps to prepare Amrut Mitti. 300 square meters of area will be dedicated for making heaps, balance 5,648 Sq. Mt. of area will be utilized for sowing biomass again. • 26 Kg., 4 Kg. & 4 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha respectively will be sown in the said area in the similar way as done in the first round. Costing for sowing Table-3 2nd Round of Biomass Sowing ( 5th Month ) 1.29 Acre (5648 Sq. Mt.) Crop Planting Distance (Sq. Ft.) Seeds Required for Rate Amount1000 Sq. Mt. 5648 Sq. Mt. (Kg.) Maize To Be Broadcasted 4.60 26 From FieldMustard 0.69 4 Dhaincha 0.69 4 Labor ( sowing ) 10 Days or 2 Hrs. by Tractor 200 / day or 1000 / Hrs. 2,000 Irrigation 5 HP Motor Rs.5,000 / Year 1,670 Labor ( harvesting ) By Our Fixed Labor 0 Amrut Jal 1 Ltr. / Sq. Mt. * 4 Times ( At Time of Sowing & on 15th, 30th & 45th Day ) Rs.0.17 / Ltr. 3,841 Total Cost. ( A ) 7,511
  44. 44. 39 | P a g e 1st Round of Heap Making (Table 4, Fig. 3) • After drying, the green biomass will get reduced to 7,435 Kg. (approx.), i.e. 25% of its total weight of 29,740 Kg. and is ready for making Amrut Mitti in the 5th month on wards. The heaps shall be prepared as described under “Amrut Mitti”. • 5% of total dry biomass will be kept aside for mulching over heaps. Balance 7,063 Kg. of dry biomass will be available for making heaps. • A normal heap of size 10´x3´x1´ (LxBxH) will require 150 Kg. of biomass. Accordingly 47 heaps can be prepared. Each heap will produce 25 Cu Ft. or 675 Liters of Amrut Mitti. Costing of making 1st round of heap Table 4 1st Round Heap Preparation ( 5th Month ) 1.36 Acer (5948 Sq. Mt. ) Green Biomass (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mtr. 29,740 After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 7,435 Biomass To Be Used (Kg.) Dry Biomass - 5 % ( Kept for Mulching on Heap ) 7,063 No of Heaps 150 Kg. / Heap 47 Amount Of Amrut Mitti Prepared by Heaps in (Liters) 25 Cu. Ft. / Heap & 27 Ltr./ Cu. Ft 31,785 Area Required to Make Heaps (Sq. Mt.) Approx. 300 Area Left For Next Sowing (Sq. Mt.) 5948 (Total Area) - 300 (Area Required For Heap Making) 5,648 Cost of Heap Making (B) Rs. 250/ Heap 11,750 Note: No external labor is required for the 1st round of heap making as fixed labor would be available for initial rounds of heap making.
  45. 45. 40 | P a g e Figure 3 The requirement of Amrut Mitti depends upon the kind of crops / trees grown in the main area. A crop or tree can be planted in 3 ways, such as i) on inverted umbrella shaped holes, ii) on heaps/beds of Amrut Mitti iii) on small mountain shaped Amrut Mitti heaps. The requirement of Amrut Mitti in these three methods will be different and it is mentioned in Table 5; Table 5 Sowing Type Symbol Ideal for Planting Quantity Required Inverted Umbrella shaped Holes (2 Feet diameter x 9 inch depth) H Fruit and other large trees 75 Ltr. Inverted Umbrella shaped Holes (3 Feet diameter x 9 inch depth H Fruit and other large trees 150 Ltr. Heaps/Beds (1 Sq. Mt.) B Underground & Leafy Vegetables, Vines 240 Ltr. Mountain shaped small heaps M For grains 2 Liter per heap
  46. 46. 41 | P a g e 2nd Round of Biomass Cutting (Table 6, Fig. 4) • In the mid of 8th month, the 2nd round of biomass will be harvested which will yield 1389 Kg. of Maize, 561 Kg. of Mustard and 561 Kg. of Dhaincha seeds along with 28,240 Kg. of green biomass. • Out of these 23 Kg., 3 Kg and 3 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha respectively will be kept aside for next round of sowing (see Table 7). • The income and other calculations is given in Table 6; Table 6 2nd Round of Biomass Cutting (Mid 8th Month) Crop Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Yield Per (Sq. Mt.) in (Kg.) Total Yield Next Biomass Sowing Remaining Seeds Selling Price Total Income ( Rs. )Area Seed Required Maize 5,648 0.25 1412 4,992 23 1,389 10 13,890 Mustard 0.10 565 3 561 30 16,841 Dhaincha 0.10 565 3 561 20 11,227 Green Biomass from cutting (Kg.) 5 Kg./Sq. Mt. 28,240 41,958 Figure 4
  47. 47. 42 | P a g e 3rd Round of Biomass Sowing (Table 7, Fig. 5) • The 3rd round of biomass will be sown in the 9th month. • The area available would be less than the 2nd one as some area will be utilized for making additional heaps and sowing crop (1st round) balance 4,992 Sq. Mt. of area (see Table 8) will be utilized for sowing biomass. • The sowing would require 23 Kg., 3 Kg. & 3 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha respectively. Calculation of cost for sowing Table 7 3rd Round of Biomass Sowing ( 9th Month ) 1.14 Acre (4992 Sq. Mt.) Crop Planting Distance (Sq. Ft.) Seeds Required for Rate Amount1000 Sq. Mt. 4992 Sq. Mt. (Kg.) Maize To Be Broadcasted 4.60 23 From FieldMustard 0.69 3 Dhaincha 0.69 3 Labor (sowing) 10 Days or 2 Hrs. by Tractor 200 / day or 1000 / Hrs. 2,000 Irrigation 5 HP Motor Rs.5000 / Year 1,670 Labor (harvesting) 10 Days 200 / day 2,000 Amrut Jal 1 Ltr. / Sq. Mt. * 4 Times ( At Time of Sowing & on 15th, 30th & 45th Day ) Rs.0.17 / Ltr. 3,395 Total Cost. ( A ) 9,065
  48. 48. 43 | P a g e 2nd Round of Heap Making (Table 8, Fig. 5) • 7,060 Kg. (i.e. 25% of 28,240 Kg. green biomass) dry biomass will be available for 2nd round of heaps (as per Table 6). The process will start in the 9th month as described under “Amrut Mitti”. • Out of this, some biomass will be kept aside for mulching @ 5% over heaps and 1 kg. per sq. mt. over upcoming crop balance 6,291 Kg. will be used for making 42 heaps. • 5,648 Sq. Mt. of land was used in sowing 2nd round of biomass, out of which 240 Sq. Mt. will be used in making another 42 heaps and 417 Sq. Mt. for sowing plants and crops in the main area by using Amrut Mitti. Table 8 2nd Round Heap Preparation (9th Month) 1.48 Acre (6452 Sq. Mt.) Green Biomass (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mtr. 28,240 After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 7,060 Biomass To Be Used (Kg.) Dry Biomass - 5 % (Kept for Mulching on Heap) - 1 Kg. / Sq. Mt. (Kept For Mulching The Upcoming Crop Sowing) 6,291 No of Heaps 150 Kg. / Heap 42 Amount Of Amrut Mitti Prepared by Heaps in (Liters) 25 Cu.Ft./ Heap & 27 Ltr./ Cu. Ft 28,307 Area Required to Make Heaps (Sq. Mt.) In Addition to Previous Area 240 Area Required for Next Crop Sowing (As Per Planning) 417 Area Left For Next Sowing (Sq. Mt.) 5648 (Total Area) - 240 (Additional Area Required For Heap Making) - 417 (Area Req. for Crop Sowing Coming Ahead) 4,992 Cost of Heap Making (B) Rs. 250 / Heap 10,500 Note: No external labor is required for the 1st round of heap making as fixed labor would be available for initial rounds of heap making.
  49. 49. 44 | P a g e Figure 5
  50. 50. 45 | P a g e 1st Round of Crop Sowing (Table 9, Fig. 6) • 31,785 Ltr. of Amrut Mitti will be ready from 1st round of preparation (as per Table 4). Therefore sowing of crop, in the 1st round, will start in 11th month. • This Amrut Mitti will be used for plantation either on heaps/beds, holes or mountains. The size of these can vary depending upon the selection of plant/crop. The standard size and requirement of Amrut Mitti is mentioned in Table 5. • A nursery of fruit plants such as Guava, Sitafal, Mosambi, Orange, Lemon and Mango will be prepared on 7 beds of size 9ftx3ftx9in (LxBxH) each. It would require 650 liters of Amrut Mitti. Similarly, other plants/crops will be planted as mentioned in Table 9. Table 9 Round - 1 Of Sowing ( 11th Month ) Amrut Mitti - 47 Beds ( 31725 Ltr.) Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance ( Ft. ) Sowing Area ( Sq. Mt.) Required Amrit Mitti ( Liters ) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Guava B Re-PlantedInSoilby 3-12Months Nursery 18.9 ( 7 Bed ) 4,550 14 25 350 October NewCrop Sitafal B Each Bed Of 14 10 140 Mossambi B 3 X 9 X 9" 14 25 350 Orange B Requires 14 25 350 Lemon B 650 Liters 14 10 140 Mango B Amrut Mitti 14 25 350 Palak B 3 Broadcast 11 2,640 11 Sq. Mt. 1 11 October Jan Potato B 3.5 1 X 1 11 2,640 117 1 117 11-Jan Carrot B 3 6" X 6" 11 2,640 474 1 474 Jan B 3 6" X 6" 2.7 648 105 1 105 Green Pees H 4 2 X 2 14.4 2,700 36 1 36 Feb Cabbage B 4 1.5 X 1.5 11 2,640 50 1 50 Feb Cauliflower B Tomato H 5 3 X 3 32.4 2,700 36 1 36 March Brinjal H 5 3 X 3 16.2 2,700 18 1 18 March Chilli H 6 3 X 3 16.2 2,700 18 1 18 April Chana M 3.5 1 X 1 131.1 2,622 1,311 0.1 131 October 21-Jan Wheat M 4 9 " X 9 " 70.2 2,496 1,248 0.1 125 Feb Pathways 70.4 - Total 416.5 31,676 2,801
  51. 51. 46 | P a g e 3rd Round of Biomass Cutting (Table 10, Fig. 6) • In mid of 12th month, the 3rd round of biomass will be harvested. T • the cultivation in the area of 4,992 Sq. Mt. will yield 1228 Kg. of Maize, 559 Kg. of Mustard and 559 Kg. of Dhaincha seeds along with 24,960 Kg. of green biomass. • Out of which 20 Kg., 3 Kg and 3 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha shall be kept aside for next round of sowing (see table 11). Table 10 3rd Round of Biomass Cutting (Mid 12th Month) Crop Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Yield Per (Sq. Mt.) in ( Kg.) Total Yield Next Biomass Sowing Remaining Seeds Selling Price Total Income (Rs.) Area Seed Required Maize 4992 0.25 1,248 4446 20 1,228 10 12,275 Mustard 0.10 499 3 559 30 16,770 Dhaincha 0.10 499 3 559 20 11,180 Green Biomass from cutting (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 24,960 40,225 Figure 6
  52. 52. 47 | P a g e 4th Round of Biomass Sowing (Table 11, Fig. 7) • The 4th round of biomass will be sown in the 13th month. • The area available would be less than the 3rd one as some area will be utilized for making additional heaps and sowing crop (2nd round). 4,356 Sq. Mt. of area will be utilized for sowing biomass (see Table 12). • The sowing would require 20 Kg., 3 Kg. & 3 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha respectively. Table 11 4th Round of Biomass Sowing ( 13th Month ) 1.02 Acer (4356 Sq. Mt.) Crop Planting Seeds Req. for Rate AmountDistance 1000 Sq. Mt. 4,356 Sq. Mt. (Sq. Ft.) (Kg.) Maize To Be Broadcasted 4.60 20 From FieldMustard 0.69 3 Dhaincha 0.69 3 Labor ( sowing ) 10 Days or 2 Hrs. by Tractor 220 / day or 1100 / Hrs. 2,200 Irrigation 5 HP Motor Rs.6,000 / Year 2,000 Labor ( harvesting ) By Our Fixed Labor 0 Amrut Jal 1 Ltr. / Sq. Mt. * 4 Times ( At Time of Sowing & on 15th, 30th & 45th Day ) Rs.0.17 / Ltr. 2,962 Total Cost. ( A ) 7,162
  53. 53. 48 | P a g e 3rd Round of Heap Making (Table 12, Fig. 7) • Pruning of live fencing shall be carried out in the 12th month. At this point of time, we will get green biomass from two sources (i.e. one from cultivation and other from pruning of trees). After drying 13,765 kg. (6,239 Kg. and 7,526 kg.) dry biomass will be available. Out of this, some biomass will be kept aside for mulching @ 5% over heaps and 1 kg. per sq. mt. over upcoming crop balance will be used for making heaps. • The 3rd round of heap making will start in 13th month. Now it would leave 4,356 Sq. Mt. of area for sowing biomass in the next round. Table 12 1.14 Acer (4,992 Sq. Mt. ) Green Biomass (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 24,960 After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 6,239 Biomass To Be Used (Kg.) Dry Biomass - 5 % ( Kept for Mulching on Heap ) - 1 kg. / Sq. Mt. (Kept For Mulching The Upcoming Crop Sowing) 5,561 Biomass From Live Fencing Drumsticks - 17Kg * 132 Plants = 2244 Kg 30,105 Gliricidia - 17Kg * 141 Plant = 2397 Kg Singapore Cherry - 8.5 Kg * 72 Plant = 612 Kg Mulberry - 17Kg * 68 Plant = 1156 Kg Jatropa - 8.5Kg * 68 Plant = 578 Kg Ardusi - 3.5Kg * 133 Plant = 465 Kg Zendu - .5Kg * 142 Plant = 70 Kg Ambadi - 1Kg * 274 Plant = 274 Kg Vettiver Grass - 3Kg * 686 Plant = 2058 Kg Banana - 50Kg * 405 Plant = 20250 Kg After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 7,526 No of Heaps 150 Kg. / Heap 87 Amount Of Amrut Mitti Prepared by Heaps in ( Liters ) 25 Cu. Ft./ Heap & 27 Ltr./ Cu. Ft 58,894 Area Required to Make Heaps (Sq. Mt.) In Addition to Previous Area 270 Area Required for Next Crop Sowing ( As Per Planning ) 366 Area Left For Next Sowing (Sq. Mt.) 4992 (Total Area) - 270 (Additional Area Required for Heap Making) - 366 ( Area Req. for Crop Sowing Coming Ahead ) 4,356 Cost of Heap Making (B) Rs. 650/ Heap 56,550 Note: External labor is required in the heap making process from the 3rd round onwards, therefore additional cost of external labor considered in heap making.
  54. 54. 49 | P a g e Figure 7
  55. 55. 50 | P a g e 1st Round of Crop Harvesting: The plants/crops, sown in the 11th month as 1st round of crop, is ready to harvest from 13th month on ward.The harvesting shall continue from 13 to 17th month depending on the plants/crops. The total yield and income is given in Table 13; Table 13 Round - 1 Of Crop Harvesting (13th - 17th Month ) Crop Canopy Area (Sq. Ft. ) Number of Plants Yield Per Acre, Per Sq. Ft. (Kg.) Total Yield (Kg.) Selling Price Income Month Of Harvest Carrot 0.25 474 40,000 1.00 119 10 1,185 End Of Dec0.25 105 40,000 1.00 26 10 263 Palak 110 110 Sq. Ft 12,000 0.30 33 20 660 Potato 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 Half Of Jan Chana 1 1,311 1,600 0.04 52 50 2,622 Green Peas 4 36 5,000 0.13 18 20 360 End of Jan Cabbage 2.25 50 18,000 0.45 51 15 759 Cauliflower Wheat 0.5625 1248 2,800 0.07 49 20 983 Tomato 9 36 66,667 1.67 540 10 5,400 End of Feb Brinjal 9 18 53,333 1.33 216 10 2,160 Chilli 9 18 8,889 0.22 36 20 720 End Of MarMoong 0.5625 1248 400 0.01 7 50 351 Palak 110 110 Sq. Ft 12,000 0.30 33 20 660 Methi 102 102 Sq. Ft. 8,000 0.20 20 20 408 End Of April Dhaniya 205 205 Sq. Ft. 10,000 0.25 51 20 1,025 Corn 4 315 4,000 0.10 126 10 1,260 Radish 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 Bajra 4 36 2,000 0.05 7 20 144 Total 1,619 21,300
  56. 56. 51 | P a g e 1.1 Round of Crop Sowing (Table 14, Fig. 8) The 1st round of harvest in 13th month will create some space for next round of sowing in the 14th month (see Table 14). This portion of land is already enriched with Amrut mitti. Table 14 Round - 1.1 Of Sowing ( 14th Month ) Amrut Mitti - Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Liters) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Palak Bed 3 Broadcast 11 0 11 Sq. Mt. 1 11 Jan April Palak Sweet Potato Bed 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 0 0 June Carrot Bed 5 1 X 1 2.7 0 26 0 0 Raddish Bed 3 1 X 1 11 0 117 1 117 11-Jan 11-Apr Potato Corn Mountain 3.5 2 X 2 131.1 0 315 1 315 21-Jan May Chana Total 326 Figure 8
  57. 57. 52 | P a g e 2nd Round of Crop Sowing (Table 15, Fig. 9) The harvest in 15th & 16th month and the rise of canopy of fruit plants will provide an opportunity for sowing next crop. The replacement crop and the new crop can be sown as mentioned in the Table 15; Table 15 Round - 2 Of Sowing ( 15th & 16th Month ) Amrut Mitti - 42 Beds ( 26,325 Ltr. ) & Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Liters) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantati on Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Bajra H 3 2 X 2 14.4 0 36 0 0 February May Green Pees Ground B 4 1 X 1 11 0 117 0 0 June Cabbage Nut Cauliflower Moong M 2 9 " X 9 " 70.2 0 1248 0 0 April Wheat Chauli H 4 3 X 3 32.4 0 36 0 0 March July Tomato Brinjal H 3.5 3 X 3 16.2 0 18 0 0 15-Jun Brinjal Sweet Potato B 5 1 X 1 4.5 1080 43 0 0 Feb July Free Space Onion B 4 9" X 4" 13.5 2160 540 0 0 February June NewCrop Garlic B 4 6" X 3" 13.5 1485 1080 0 0 June Musk melon B 4 3 X 8 41.2 2472 34 0 0 15-May Karela B 4 3 X 8 41.2 2472 34 0 0 20-Apr Methi B 4 Broadcast 0.0 On Karela Bed 10.2 Sq. Mt. 0 0 June Loki B 6 2.25 X 6 41.1 4932 30 0 0 20-Jun Galka B 4 2.25 X 6 41.1 4932 30 0 0 20-Apr Dhaniya B 4 9" Line 0.0 On Loki Bed 20.5 Sq. Mt. 0 0 June Water Mellon B 4 3 X 15 49.5 2376 22 0 0 15-May Kakdi B 3.5 3 X 15 49.5 2376 20 0 0 10-May Jowar B 3.5 2 X 2 8.25 1980 21 0 0 21-May Pathways 67.1 Total 366.0 26,265 0 The replaced crop will be sown on the land already enriched with Amrut Mitti therefore no additional Amrut Mitti is required for these plants/crops. Sowing Sweet Potato and other new crops, the land will require fresh stock of Amrut Mitti as mentioned in Table 15.
  58. 58. 53 | P a g e Note: 1. The Amrut Mitti is taken away to enrich the land for new crop. Thus the space vacated by Amrut Mitti can be used to grow additional biomass required for mulching and to prepare Amrut Mitti. 2. To grow Water melon, Kakdi, Musk melon, Karela, Loki and Galka, 9 ft. wide pit shall be dug in ground. it will be filled with Amrut Mitti. The roots of these crops can come out of the bed and get exposed to sun, if sown on bed over ground. 3. Brinjal - After the crop is over, we will prune all the leaves of the plant and maintain and nurture its structure. After some time, it will be ready for next round of flowering / harvest. 4. Onion is planted on 6 inch bed and Garlic on 4 inch bed. 4th Round of Biomass Cutting (Table 16, Fig. 9) In mid of 16th month, the 4rd round of biomass will be harvested. The cultivation in the area of 4,446 Sq. Mt. will yield 1,112 Kg. of Maize, 445 Kg. of Mustard and 445 Kg. of Dhaincha seeds along with 22,230 Kg. of green biomass. Out of which 18 Kg., 3 Kg and 3 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha shall be kept aside for next round of sowing (see table 17). The income and other calculations are given in Table 16 below; Table 16 4th Round of Biomass Cutting ( Mid 16th Month ) Crop Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Yield Per (Sq. Mt.) in (Kg.) Total Yield Next Biomass Sowing Remaining Seeds Selling Price Total Income (Rs.)Area Seed Required Maize 4,446 0.25 1,112 3,844 18 1,120 10 11,200 Mustard 0.10 445 3 442 30 13,256 Dhaincha 0.10 445 3 442 20 8,837 Green Biomass from cutting (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 22,230 33,293
  59. 59. 54 | P a g e Figure 9
  60. 60. 55 | P a g e 5th Round of Biomass Sowing (Table 17, Fig. 10) • The 5th round of biomass will be sown in the 17th month. The area available would be less than the 4nd one. Though some area will be vacated by heaps/ Amrut mitti but a large portion will be used for sowing next crop (3rd round). Balance 3,844 Sq. Mt. of area (see Table 18) will be utilized for sowing biomass. • The sowing would require 18 Kg., 3 Kg. & 3 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha respectively. Table 17 5th Round of Biomass Sowing ( 17th Month ) 0.88 Acer (3,844 Sq. Mt.) Crop Planting Distance (Sq. Ft.) Seeds Required for Rate Amount1000 Sq. Mt. 3844 Sq. Mt. (Kg.) Maize To Be Broadcasted 4.60 18 From FieldMustard 0.69 3 Dhaincha 0.69 3 Labor ( sowing ) 10 Days or 2 Hrs. by Tractor 220 / day or 1100 / Hrs. 2,200 Irrigation 5 HP Motor Rs.6,000 / Year 2,000 Labor ( harvesting ) By Our Fixed Labor 0 Amrut Jal 1 Ltr. / Sq. Mt. * 4 Times (At Time of Sowing & on 15th, 30th & 45th Day) Rs.0.17 / Ltr. 2,614 Total Cost. ( A ) 6,814
  61. 61. 56 | P a g e 4th Round of Heap Making (Table 18, Fig. 10) • 5,444 Kg. (i.e. 25% of 21,778 Kg. green biomass) dry biomass will be available for 4th round of heaps. • The process will start in the 17th month as described under “Amrut Mitti”. • Out of this, some biomass will be kept aside for mulching @ 5% over heaps and 1 kg. per sq. mt. over upcoming crop. Balance 4,608 Kg. will be used for making 31 heaps. Table 18 4th Round Heap Preparation ( 17th Month ) 1.04 Acre (4549 Sq. Mt.) Green Biomass (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mtr. 21,778 After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 5,444 Biomass To Be Used (Kg.) Dry Biomass - 5 % (Kept for Mulching on Heap) - 1 Kg. / Sq. Mt. (Kept For Mulching The Upcoming Crop Sowing) 4,608 No of Heaps 150 Kg. / Heap 31 Amount Of Amrut Mitti Prepared by Heaps in (Liters) 25 Cu. Ft./ Heap & 27 Ltr./ Cu. Ft 20,737 Area Required to Make Heaps (Sq. Mt.) In Addition to Previous Area -53 Area Required for Next Crop Sowing (As Per Planning) 564 Area Left For Next Sowing (Sq. Mt.) 4549 (Total Area) - (-53) (Additional Area Required for Heap Making) - 515 ( Area Req. for Crop Sowing Coming Ahead ) 3,844 Cost of Heap Making (B) Rs. 650 / Heap 20,150 Note: 31 heaps will not cover the entire space vacated by Amrut Mitti, shifted to other location for sowing crop. Therefore, the free space will be added for sowing the crop (-ve value mentioned in the table is the additional free space available for crop).
  62. 62. 57 | P a g e Round 2.1 of Crop Sowing (Table 19, Fig. 10) This round of sowing will begin in the 17th and 18th month after the harvest of some of the previous crops/plants. Since all the seeds shall be sown on existing beds, no additional Amrut Mitti is required. There will be no additional cost of seeds as the same are preserved and stored from previous harvest. Table 19 Round - 2.1 Of Sowing (17th & 18th Month) Amrut Mitti - Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Liters) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Chilly H 4.5 3 X 3 16.2 0 18 0 0 April 16-Aug Chilly S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 0 0 Sep Palak Corn M 3.5 2 X 2 70.2 0 171 0 0 11-Jul Moong Sweet Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 0 0 11-Apr 11-Sep Radish Karela B 4 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0 0 20-Apr 11-Jul Karela Galka B 4 3 X 6 41.1 0 30 0 0 11-Jul Galka Lady Finger M 6 2 X 2 84 0 210 0 0 May Nov Corn Corn M 3.5 2 X 2 28 0 70 0 0 11-Aug Tuar H 8 2 X 2 14.4 0 36 0 0 Jan Bajra Karela B 4 3 X 8 49.5 0 20 0 0 11-May Aug Kakdi Kaddu B 4 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0 0 15-May Sep Musk melon Kaddu B 4 3 X 15 49.5 0 22 0 0 Sep Water Mellon Jowar B 3.5 2 X 2 8.25 0 21 0 0 21-May Sep Jowar Total 0 Note: New seeds of Karela, Kaddu & Galka will be planted next to their plants, 40 days before completion of first crop so that the , so that the new plants will grow to some extent without disturbing the old ones and 40 days will be saved.
  63. 63. 58 | P a g e Figure 10
  64. 64. 59 | P a g e Round 2 of Crop Harvest: The 2nd of crop will be harvested from 18th to 22nd month depending upon the maturity of different plants/crops. Total yield and income is given in Table 20; Table 20 Round - 2 Of Crop Cultivation ( 18th - 22nd Month ) Crop Canopy Area (Sq. Ft.) Number of Plants Yield Total Yield (Kg.) Selling Price Income Month Of Harvest Per Acer Per Sq. Ft. (Kg.) Kakdi 6 20 10,000 0.25 30 10 300 Half Of May Methi 102 Seeds 275 0.007 0.70 50 35 End Of May Dhaniya 205 Seeds 321 0.008 1.65 50 82 Jowar 4 21 2,000 0.05 4 20 84 Ground Nut 1 117 4,000 0.10 12 40 468 Musk melon 24 34 28,000 0.70 571 10 5,712 Water Mellon 45 22 40,000 1.00 990 10 9,900 Onion 0.25 540 28,000 0.70 95 10 945 Garlic 0.13 1080 2800 0.07 10 50 491 Galka 13.5 30 80,000 2.00 810 10 8,100 Karela 24 34 20,000 0.50 408 10 4,080 Sweet Potato 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 1 26 40,000 1.00 26 10 260 Brinjal 9 18 53,333 1.33 216 10 2,160 Half Of June Chauli 9 36 4,000 0.10 32 20 648 End Of June Sweet Potato 1 43 40,000 1.00 43 10 430 Corn 4 171 4,000 0.10 68 10 684 Half Of July Loki 13.5 30 80,000 2.00 810 10 8,100 End Of July Moong 0.5625 116 400 0.01 0.65 50 33 0.5625 116 400 0.01 0.65 50 33 Corn 4 70 4,000 0.10 28 10 280 Half Of Aug Chilli 9 18 8,889 0.22 36 20 720 Table Continued….
  65. 65. 60 | P a g e Round - 2 Of Crop Cultivation ( 18th - 22nd Month ) Crop Canopy Area (Sq. Ft.) Number of Plants Yield Total Yield (Kg.) Selling Price Income Month Of Harvest Per Acer Per Sq. Ft. (Kg.) Palak 205 205 Sq. Ft. 12,000 0.30 62 20 1,230 End Of Aug Jowar 4 21 2,000 0.05 4 20 84 Galka 13.5 30 80,000 2.00 810 10 81,00 Karela 24 34 20,000 0.50 408 10 4,080 Sweet Potato 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 Dhaniya 67.5 67.5 Sq. Ft. 10,000 0.25 17 20 338 67.5 67.5 Sq. Ft. 17 338 177 177 Sq. Ft. 44 885 273 27.3 Sq. Mt. 68 1,365 63 63 Sq. Ft. 16 315 63 63 Sq. Ft. 16 315 Sweet Potato 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 Half Of Sep Karela 24 20 20,000 0.50 240 10 2,400 Kaddu 24 34 40,000 1.00 816 10 8,160 45 22 40,000 1.00 990 10 9,900 45 50 40,000 1.00 2,250 10 22,500 End Of Sep Brinjal 9 18 53,333 1.33 216 10 2,160 Onion 0.25 612 28,000 0.70 107 10 1,071 Rice 0.5625 1452 4,000 0.1 82 25 2,042 Total 10,706 1,12,337
  66. 66. 61 | P a g e 3rd Round of Sowing (Table 21, Fig. 11) The 3rd round of sowing will be carried out in 19th & 20th month. Some sowing will be carried out on the beds used for crop for which no new Amrut Mitti is required. For others fresh Amrut Mitti will be spread over the new / free space. 87 beds or 58,725 Ltr. of new Amrut Mitti will be used for new crops and some for replaced crops of onion/ garlic as well. Details are given in Table 21; Table 21 Round - 3 Of Sowing (19th & 20th Month) Amrut Mitti - 87 Beds (58,725 Ltr.) & Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Liters) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 0 0 June Nov Ground Nut Palak B 3 Broadcast 20.5 On Loki Bed 20.5 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Sep Dhaniya Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 13.5 1080 60 0 0 May Onion Moong B 2 9" X 1.5 13.5 On Turmeric Bed 116 0 0 Aug Ginger B 10 1.5 X 1.5 13.5 1755 60 0 0 May Garlic Moong B 2 9" X 1.5 13.5 On Ginger Bed 116 0 0 Aug S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 0 0 Nov S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 2.7 0 26 0 0 Brinjal H 3.5 3 X 3 16.2 0 18 0 0 15-Jun Oct Brinjal Loki B 6 3 X 6 41.1 0 30 0 0 20-Jun 10-Nov Loki Urad H 4 3 X 3 32.4 0 36 0 0 July Nov Chauli S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 4.5 0 43 0 0 Dec S. Potato Corn M 3.5 2 X 2 70.2 0 171 0 0 11-Jul 20-Oct Corn Karela B 4 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0 0 Oct Karela Galka B 4 3 X 6 41.1 0 30 0 0 Oct Galka Table Continued….
  67. 67. 62 | P a g e Round - 3 Of Sowing ( 19th & 20th Month ) Amrut Mitti - 87 Beds ( 58725 Ltr. ) & Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti ( Liters ) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 10.2 2448 45 0 0 June May Free Space Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 0 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Sep Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 10.2 2448 45 0 0 May Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 0 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Sep Rice M 4 9" X 9" 82.5 2904 1,452 0 June Oct New Crop Chilly H 6 3 X 3 29.7 4950 33 0 0 Dec Loki B 6 3 X 15 115.5 5544 52 0 0 42663 Kaddu B 4 3 X 15 115.5 5544 50 0 0 42628 Ginger B 10 1.5 X 1.5 26.7 6408 118 0 0 May Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 0 On Ginger Bed 17.7 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Sep Brinjal B 5 3 X 3 49.5 8250 55 0 0 Nov Onion B 4 9" X 4" 15.3 2448 612 0 0 Oct Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 9.9 2376 44 0 0 May Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 0 On Turmeric Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Sep Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 41.4 9936 184 0 0 May Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 0 On Turmeric Bed 27.3 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Sep Ginger B 10 1.5 X 1.5 9.9 2376 44 0 0 May Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 0 On Ginger Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Sep Pathways 67.6 Total 563.5 58,467 0
  68. 68. 63 | P a g e Note: I. The Turmeric will be planted on onion bed (6 inch). The turmeric requires 9 inch thick bed. Therefore Amrut Mitti is added to the onion bed (3 inch thick @ 80 Ltr. per Sq. Mtr.). II. The garlic bed on which ginger is planted was 4 inch thick thus additional 5 inch of Amrut Mitti is added to garlic beds (@ 130 Ltr. per Sq. Mt.). III. The area of Dhaniya is calculated by (No. of lines in one bed x Planting distance x Number of beds) i.e. (21 x 9” x 3) which is the total area of all lines. IV. The 6 inch high bed is prepared for new crop of onion.
  69. 69. 64 | P a g e 5th Round of Biomass Cutting (Table 22, Fig. 11) • In the mid of 20th month, the 5rd round of biomass will be harvested. • The cultivation in the area of 3,844 Sq. Mt. will yield 979 Kg. of Maize, 395 Kg. of Mustard and 395 Kg. of Dhaincha seeds along with 19,222 kg. of green biomass. • Out of which 16 Kg., 2 Kg and 2 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha respectively shall be kept aside for next round of sowing (see table 23). Table 22 5th Round of Biomass Cutting ( Mid 20th Month ) Crop Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Yield Per (Sq. Mt.) in (Kg.) Total Yield Next Biomass Sowing Remaining Seeds Selling Price Total Income (Rs.)Area Seed Required Maize 3979 0.25 995 3523 16 979 10 9,785 Mustard 0.10 398 2 395 30 11,864 Dhaincha 0.10 398 2 395 20 7,909 Green Biomass from cutting (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 19,895 29,559 Figure 11
  70. 70. 65 | P a g e 6th Round of Biomass Sowing (Table 23, Fig. 12) • The 6th round of biomass will be sown in the 21st month. The area available would be less than the 5th one. Though some area will be vacated by heaps/ Amrut mitti but a large portion will be used for sowing next crop (4th round). Balance 3,519 Sq. Mt. of area (see Table 24) will be utilized for sowing biomass. • The sowing would require 16 Kg., 2 Kg. & 2 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha respectively. Table 23 6th Round of Biomass Sowing (21th Month) 0.80 Acer (3519 Sq. Mt.) Crop Planting Distance (Sq. Ft.) Seeds Required for Rate Amount1000 Sq. Mt. 3519 Sq. Mt. (Kg.) Maize To Be Broadcasted 4.60 16 From FieldMustard 0.69 2 Dhaincha 0.69 2 Labor ( sowing ) 5 Days or 1 Hrs. by Tractor 220 / day or 1100 / Hrs. 1,100 Irrigation 5 HP Motor Rs.6,000 / Year 2,000 Labor ( harvesting ) 5 Days 220 / day 1,100 Amrut Jal 1 Ltr. / Sq. Mt. * 4 Times (At Time of Sowing & on 15th, 30th & 45th Day) Rs.0.17 / Ltr. 2,393 Total Cost. ( A ) 6,593
  71. 71. 66 | P a g e 5th Round of Heap Making (Table 24, Fig. 12) • The 5th round of heap making will start in 21st month. Pruning of some plants shall be carried out. At this point of time we will get green biomass from two sources (i.e. one from cultivation and other from pruning of trees). After drying, 11,604 kg. (4,805 Kg. and 6,799 kg.) dry biomass will be available. • Out of this, some biomass will be kept aside for mulching @ 5% over heaps and 1 kg. per sq. mt. over upcoming crop balance will be used for making heaps. • 3,519 Sq. Mt. of area will be available for sowing biomass in the next round. Table 24 5th Round Heap of Preparation (21st Month) 0.88 Acer (3635 Sq. Mt.) Green Biomass (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 19,222 After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 4,805 Biomass To Be Used (Kg.) Dry Biomass - 5 % ( Kept for Mulching on Heap ) - 1 Kg. / Sq. Mt. (Kept For Mulching The Upcoming Crop Sowing) 4,168 Biomass From Live Fencing Drumsticks – 17 Kg * 132 Plants = 2244 Kg 27,197 Gliricidia – 17 Kg * 141 Plant = 2397 Kg Singapore Cherry - 8.5 Kg * 72 Plant = 612 Kg Mulberry - 12.5Kg * 68 Plant = 850 Kg Jatropa - 8.5Kg * 68 Plant = 578 Kg Banana - 50Kg * 405 Plant = 20250 Kg Ardusi - 2Kg * 133 Plant = 266 Kg After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 6,799 No of Heaps 150 Kg. / Heap 73 Amount Of Amrut Mitti Prepared by Heaps in (Liters) 25 Cu. Ft./ Heap & 27 Ltr./ Cu. Ft 49,353 Area Required to Make Heaps (Sq. Mt.) In Addition to Previous Area -72 Area Required for Next Crop Sowing ( As Per Planning ) 397 Area Left For Next Sowing (Sq. Mt.) 3635 (Total Area) - 533 (Area Required For Heap Making) - 225 (Remaining 50 % Area of Coverage Of Previous Round Heaps) 3,519 Cost of Heap Making (B) Rs. 650 / Heap 47,450
  72. 72. 67 | P a g e Round 3.1 of Crop Sowing (Table 25, Fig. 12) This round of sowing crop will begin in the 21st and 22nd month after the harvest of some of the previous crops/plants. Since all the seeds shall be sown on existing beds, no additional Amrut Mitti is required. There will be no additional cost of seeds as the same are preserved and stored from previous harvest. Table 25 Round - 3.1 Of Sowing ( 21st & 22nd Month ) Amrut Mitti - Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq.Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti ( Liters ) Number of Plants Cost Per Plants Total Cost of Plants Plantation Months Next Crop Months Crop Replaced Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 8.7 On Turmeric Bed 8.7 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Aug Nov Moong B 3 9" Line 8.7 On Ginger Bed 8.7 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Nov Karela B 4 3 X 8 49.5 0 20 0 0 20-Oct Karela Palak M 3 Broadcast 28 0 28 Sq. Mt 0 0 11-Aug 11-Nov Corn Chilly H 4.5 3 X 3 16.2 0 18 0 0 16-Aug Dec Chilly Cabbage B 4 1.5 X 1.5 8.25 0 38 0 0 Sep Jan Jowar Sweet Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 0 0 Feb Sweet Potato Loki B 6 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0 0 16-Jan Kaddu Loki B 6 3 X 15 49.5 0 22 0 0 16-Jan Kaddu Palak B 3 Broadcast 20.5 On Loki Bed 20.5 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Dec Palak Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 17.7 On Ginger Bed 17.7 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.3 On Turmeric Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 27.3 On Turmeric Bed 27.3 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.3 On Ginger Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Dec Dhaniya Sweet Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 0 0 11-Sep 11-Feb Sweet Potato Loki B 6 3 X 15 115.5 0 50 0 0 15-Sep Feb Kaddu Total 0
  73. 73. 68 | P a g e Figure 12
  74. 74. 69 | P a g e 4th Round of sowing (Table 26, Fig. 13) The 4th round of crop sowing will start in 23rd and 24th month. At this time, some of the beds will be vacated after harvesting some crops/plants. Some plants or crops will be sown on these vacant beds where as others on new area / land. Fresh stock of Amrut Mitti will be required to enrich the new land. By this time, the saplings of fruit plants (Guava, Sitafal, Mosambi, Orange, Lemon and Mango) will be ready in the nursery. The same shall be transplanted in its allocated area. The requirement of Amrut Mitti and other calculations are given in Table 26; Table 26 Round - 4 Of Sowing ( 23rd & 24th Month ) Amrut Mitti - 31 Beds ( 20,925 Ltr. ) & Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Liters) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Onion B 4 9" X 4" 15.3 0 816 0 0 Oct Feb Onion B 1.5 288 New Crop B 3.6 0 Rice B 4 9" X 4" 3 0 116 0 0 Oct Feb Brinjal H 3.5 3 X 3 16.2 18 0 0 Oct 16-Jan Brinjal Karela B 4 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0 0 Oct 20-Dec Karela Dhaniya B 3 Broadcast 23.2 On Karela Bed 23.2 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Oct Jan New Crop Galka B 4 3 X 6 41.1 0 30 0 0 Oct 20-Dec Galka Karela B 4 3 X 15 115.5 0 52 0 0 20-Oct 10-Jan Loki Dhaniya B 3 Broadcast 34.7 On Karela Bed 34.7 Sq. Mt. 0 0 20-Oct 20-Jan New Crop Tomato H 5 3 X 3 29.7 2550 33 0 0 20-Oct 20-Mar Corn H New Crop Karela B 4 3 X 8 49.5 0 20 0 0 20-Oct 10-Jan Karela Dhaniya B 3 Broadcast 14.9 On Karela Bed 14.9 Sq. Mt. 0 0 20-Oct 20-Jan New Crop Table Continued….
  75. 75. 70 | P a g e Round - 4 Of Sowing ( 23rd & 24th Month ) Amrut Mitti - 31 Beds ( 20,925 Ltr. ) & Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq.Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti ( Liters ) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Carrot B 3 6" X 6" 11 0 474 0 0 Nov Feb Sweet PotatoRadish B 3 1 X 1 11 0 117 0 0 B 3 1 X 1 2.7 0 26 0 0 Tomato H 5 3 X 3 32.4 0 36 0 0 Nov Apr Urad Methi B 3 9" Line 8.7 On Turmeric Bed 8.7 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Nov Feb Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 8.7 On Ginger Bed 8.7 Sq. Mt. 0 0 Nov Brinjal H 3.5 3 X 3 49.5 0 55 0 0 Nov 16-Feb Brinjal Loki B 6 3 X 6 41.1 0 30 0 0 10-Nov Apr Loki Palak M 3 Broadcast 56 0 43 Sq. Mt 0 0 11-Nov 11-Feb Palak Chana M 3.5 1 X 1 84 0 798 0 0 Mar Lady Finger Potato B 3.5 1 X 1 8.05 1932 90 1 90 October Apr Free Space B 10.35 2484 113 1 113 Cabbage B 4 1.5 X 1.5 6.375 1530 29 0 0 Feb B 4 1.5 X 1.5 6.375 1530 29 0 0 Guava H 30 X 30 58.8 { 150 Ltr. X 72 Plants (10,800 ) - Nursery Soil ( 3,900 ) } = 6,900 12 0 0 October New Crop Sitafal H 58.8 12 0 0 Mosambi H 58.8 12 0 0 Orange H 58.8 12 0 0 Lemon H 58.8 12 0 0 Mango H 58.8 12 0 0 Wheat M 4 9 " X 9 " 105 3,696 1,848 0 0 Mar Rice 4 9" X 9" -82.5 Pathways 21 Total 396.3 20,910 0
  76. 76. 71 | P a g e Note: 1. Each fruit plant shall be allocated an area of 7’ x 7’ so that it does not get mixed with growing biomass. 2. Onion shall be planted on beds vacated by previously grown Onions and Rice (after harvest). Further onion shall be planted on new area. Additional stock of 288 Ltr. of Amrut Mitti shall be spread over this area. 3. During this month, 82.5 Sq. Mt. of space is vacated after harvesting Rice. 3rd Round of Crop Harvest: The 3rd round of crop will be harvested in 23rd and 24th month. Yield and income is given in Table 27;
  77. 77. 72 | P a g e Table 27 Round - 3 Of Crop Cultivation ( 23rd - 24th Month ) Crop Canopy Area (Sq.Ft.) Number of Plants Yield Total Yield (Kg.) Selling Price Income Month of Harvest Per Acer Per Sq. Ft. (Kg.) Urad 9 36 2,000 0.05 16 100 1,620 End Of Oct Brinjal 9 55 53,333 1.33 660 10 6,600 Lady Finger 4 210 10,000 0.25 210 20 4,200 Corn 4 171 4,000 0.1 68 10 684 Dhaniya 87 8.7 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 22 20 435 87 8.7 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 22 20 435 Sweet Potato 1 117 40,000 1 117 10 1,170 1 117 117 1,170 1 26 26 260 Palak 280 280 Sq. Ft. 12,000 0.3 84 20 1,680 Half of Nov Galka 18 30 80,000 2 1,080 10 10,800 Karela 24 34 20,000 0.5 408 10 4,080 24 20 20,000 0.5 240 10 2,400 End Of Nov Sweet Potato 1 43 40,000 1 43 10 430 Loki 45 52 80,000 2 4,680 10 46,800 Palak 205 205 Sq. Ft. 12,000 0.3 62 20 1,230 Chilly 9 33 8,889 0.22 66 20 1,320 Dhaniya 67.5 67.5 Sq. Ft. 10,000 0.25 17 20 338 67.5 67.5 Sq. Ft. 17 338 177 177 Sq. Ft. 44 885 63 63 Sq. Ft. 16 315 273 27.3 Sq. Mt. 68 1,365 63 63 Sq. Ft. 16 315 Total 8,098 88,869
  78. 78. 73 | P a g e 6th Round of Biomass Cutting (Table 28, Fig. 13) • In the mid of 24th month, the 6th round of biomass will be harvested. • The area of 3,519 Sq. Mt. will yield 868 Kg. of Maize, 287 Kg. of Mustard and 287 Kg. of Dhaincha seeds. Out of which 12 Kg., 2 Kg and 2 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha shall be kept aside for next round of sowing. • Further during harvest 17,595 Kg. of green biomass shall be collected for preparing Amrut Mitti. Table 28 6th Round of Biomass Cutting ( Mid 24th Month ) Crop Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Yield Per (Sq. Mt.) in (Kg.) Total Yield Next Biomass Sowing Remaining Seeds Selling Price Total Income (Rs.)Area Seed Required Maize 3523 0.25 881 2713 12 868 10 8,683 Mustard 0.10 352 2 287 30 8,610 Dhaincha 0.10 352 2 287 20 5,740 Green Biomass from cutting (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 17,615 23,033 Figure 13
  79. 79. 74 | P a g e 7th Round of Biomass Sowing (Table 29, Fig. 14) The 7th round of biomass will be sown in the 25th month. Now the area available would be less than the 6th round, as some area will be utilized for making heaps. 2,457 Sq. Mt. of area will be sown for biomass with 12 Kg., 2 Kg. & 2 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha respectively. Cost of sowing is calculated in the Table 29; Table 29 7th Round of Biomass Sowing ( 25th Month ) 0.56 Acer (2,457 Sq. Mt. ) Crop Planting Distance (Sq. Ft.) Seeds Required for Rate Amount1,000 Sq. Mt. 2,457 Sq. Mt. (Kg.) Maize To Be Broadcasted 4.60 11 From FieldMustard 0.69 2 Dhaincha 0.69 2 Labor ( sowing ) 5 Days or 1 Hrs. by Tractor 250 / day or 1250 / Hrs. 1,250 Irrigation 5 HP Motor Rs.7,200 / Year 2,400 Labor ( harvesting ) 5 Days 250 / day 1,250 Amrut Jal 1 Ltr. / Sq. Mt. * 4 Times (At Time of Sowing & on 15th, 30th & 45th Day) Rs.0.17 / Ltr. 1,671 Total Cost. ( A ) 6,571 6th Round of Heap Making (Table 30, Fig. 14) • The 6th round of heap making will start in 25th month. Pruning of some plants/ trees shall be carried out. At this point of time we will get green biomass from two sources (i.e. one from cultivation and other from pruning of trees). After drying 11,800 kg. (4,400 Kg. and 7,400 kg.) dry biomass will be available. • Out of this, some biomass will be kept aside for mulching @ 5% over heaps and 1 kg. per sq. mt. over upcoming crop balance will be used for making heaps. • Now, 2,457 Sq. Mt. of area will be available for sowing biomass in the next round.
  80. 80. 75 | P a g e Table 30 6th Round Heap Preparation (25th Month) 0.66 Acer (2,876 Sq. Mt.) Green Biomass (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 17,597 After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 4,399 Biomass To Be Used (Kg.) Dry Biomass - 5 % (Kept for Mulching on Heap) - 1 kg. / Sq. Mt. ( Kept For Mulching The Upcoming Crop Sowing ) 3,387 Biomass From Live Fencing Drumsticks - 17Kg * 132 Plants = 2244 Kg 29,599 Gliricidia - 17Kg * 141 Plant = 2397 Kg Singapore Cherry - 8.5 Kg * 72 Plant = 612 Kg Mulberry - 12.5Kg * 68 Plant = 850 Kg Jatropa - 8.5Kg * 68 Plant = 578 Kg Ardusi - 2Kg * 133 Plant = 266 Kg Zendu - .5Kg * 140 Plant = 70 Kg Ambadi - 1Kg * 274 Plant = 274 Kg Vetiver Grass - 3Kg * 686 Plant = 2058 Kg Banana - 50Kg * 405 Plant = 20250 Kg After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 7,400 No of Heaps 150 Kg. / Heap 72 Amount of AM prepared by Heaps (in Lit.) 25 Cu. Ft./ Heap & 27 Ltr./ Cu. Ft 48,541 Area Required to Make Heaps (Sq. Mt.) In Addition to Previous Area 270 Area Required for Next Crop Sowing ( As Per Planning ) 792 Area Left For Next Sowing (Sq. Mt.) 2876 (Total Area) - 482 (Area Required For Heap Making) - 533 ( Remaining 50 % Area of Coverage Of Previous Round Heaps) 24,57 Cost of Heap Making (B) Rs. 650 / Heap 46,800 Round 4.1 of Crop Sowing (Table 31, Fig. 14) This round of crop sowing will be carried out in 25th & 26th month. Since all plants/crops will be sown on already made beds of Amrut Mitti, which are vacated after harvest. Therefore no fresh Amrut Mitti is required for this round. Cost and other calculations are given in Table 31;
  81. 81. 76 | P a g e Table 31 Round - 4.1 Of Sowing ( 25th & 26th Month ) Amrut Mitti - Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Ltr.) Number of Plants Cost per Plant Total Cost of Plants Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Potato B 3.5 1 X 1 4.5 0 43 1 43 Dec 15-Mar Sweet Potato Chilly H 4.5 3 X 3 29.7 0 33 0.1 3 Dec 15-Apr Chilly Chilly H 4.5 3 X 3 16.2 0 18 0.1 2 Dec Chilly Palak B 3 Broadcast 20.5 On Loki Bed 20.5 Sq. Mt. 1 21 Dec Mar Palak Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 1 7 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 1 7 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 17.7 On Ginger Bed 17.7 Sq. Mt. 1 18 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.3 On Turmeric Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 1 6 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 27.3 On Turmeric Bed 27.3 Sq. Mt. 1 27 Dec Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.3 On Ginger Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 1 6 Dec Dhaniya Karela B 4 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0.1 3 20-Dec 11-Mar Karela Galka B 4 3 X 6 41.1 0 30 0.1 3 Galka Cabbage B 4 1.5 X 1.5 8.25 0 38 0.1 4 Jan May Cabbage Dhaniya B 3 Broadcast 23.2 On Karela Bed 23.2 Sq. Mt. 1 23 Jan Apr Dhaniya Corn H 3.5 2 X 2 14.4 0 36 0.1 4 Jan 11-Apr Toor Karela B 4 3 X 8 49.5 0 20 0.1 2 10-Jan Apr Karela W. Melon B 4 3 X 15 115.5 0 52 0.1 5 Apr Karela Potato B 3.5 1 X 1 8.05 0 90 1 90 11-Jan 21-May Potato B 10.35 0 113 1 113 Loki B 6 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0.1 3 16-Jan 5-Jun Loki Loki B 6 3 X 15 49.5 0 22 0.1 2 16-Jan Loki Brinjal H 3.5 3 X 3 16.2 0 18 0.1 2 16-Jan May Brinjal F. Space B 3 Broadcast 34.7 On Karela Bed 34.7 Sq.Mt. 1 35 20-Jan Dhaniya Dhaniya B 3 Broadcast 14.9 On Karela Bed 14.9 Sq.Mt. 1 15 20-Jan 20-Apr Dhaniya Total 444
  82. 82. 77 | P a g e Figure 14
  83. 83. 78 | P a g e 4th Round of Crop Harvest: The 4th round of crop will be harvested from 25th to 28th month (See Table 32). Table 32 Round - 4 Of Crop Cultivation ( 25th - 28th Month ) Crop Canopy Area (Sq. Ft.) Number of Plants Yield Total Yield (Kg.) Selling Price Income Month Of Harvest Per Acer Per Sq. Ft. (Kg.) Loki 18 30 80,000 2 1,080 10 10,800 End Of Dec Cabbage 2.25 38 18,000 0.45 38 15 577 Tuar 4 36 2,000 0.05 7 60 432 Chilly 9 18 8,889 0.22 36 20 720 Dhaniya 232 23.2 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 58 20 1,160 Brinjal 9 18 53,333 1.33 216 10 2,160 Half Of Jan Potato 1 90 40,000 1.00 90 10 900 113 40,000 1.00 113 10 1,130 Onion 0.25 816 28,000 0.70 143 10 1,428 End Of Jan 0.25 116 28,000 0.70 20 10 203 Karela 24 34 20,000 0.50 408 10 4,080 Galka 18 30 80,000 2 1,080 10 10,800 Carrot 0.25 474 40,000 1.00 119 10 1,185 Radish 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 1 26 40,000 1.00 26 10 260 Methi 87 8.7 Sq. Mt. 8,000 0.20 17 20 348 87 8.7 Sq. Mt. 8,000 0.20 17 20 348 Cabbage 2.25 29 18,000 0.45 29 15 440 2.25 29 18,000 0.45 29 15 440 Wheat 0.5625 1848 2,800 0.07 73 20 1,455 Dhaniya 347 34.7 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 87 20 1,735 149 14.9 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 37 20 745 Sweet Potato 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 Table Continued….
  84. 84. 79 | P a g e Round - 4 Of Crop Cultivation ( 25th - 28th Month ) Crop Canopy Area (Sq. Ft.) Number of Plants Yield Total Yield (Kg.) Selling Price Income Month Of Harvest Per Acer Per Sq. Ft. (Kg.) Sweet Potato 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 Half Of FebBrinjal 9 55 53,333 1.33 660 10 6,600 Palak 430 430 Sq. Ft. 12,000 0.30 129 25 3,225 Loki 24 34 80,000 2 1,632 10 16,320 End Of Feb 45 22 1,980 19,800 Karela 24 20 20,000 0.50 240 10 2,400 45 52 20,000 0.50 1,170 10 11,700 Chana 1 798 1,600 0.04 32 50 1,596 Palak 205 20.5 Sq. Mt. 12,000 0.30 62 25 1,538 Dhaniya 67.5 6.75 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 17 20 338 67.5 6.75 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 17 20 338 177 17.7 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 44 20 885 63 6.3 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 16 20 315 273 27.3 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 68 20 1,365 63 6.3 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 16 20 315 Loki 45 50 80,000 2 4500 10 45,000 Half Of MarPotato 1 43 40,000 1.00 43 10 430 Tomato 9 33 66,667 1.67 495 10 4,950 Tomato 9 36 66,667 1.67 540 10 5,400 End Of Mar Dhaniya 232 23.2 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 58 20 1,160 Total 15,794 1,68,531 5th Round of Crop Sowing (Table 33, Fig. 15)  The 5th round of crop sowing will start in 27th and 28th month. At this time, some of the beds will be vacated after harvesting the grown crops/plants. Some plants or crops will be sown on these empty beds where as others on new area / land. Fresh stock of AM will be required to enrich the new land.  Guava, Sitafal, Mosambi, Orange, Lemon and Mango shall be transplanted in its allocated area.
  85. 85. 80 | P a g e Table 33 Round - 5 Of Sowing (27th & 28th Month ) Amrut Mitti - 73 Beds ( 49,275 Ltr.) & Previous Sowing Crop Sowin g Type Crop Life (Month s) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Liters) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantati on Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Radish B 3 1 X 1 11 0 117 0.1 12 Feb May Carrot B 3 1 X 1 11 0 117 0.1 12 Radish B 3 1 X 1 2.7 0 26 0.1 3 Methi B 3 9" Line 8.7 On Turmeric Bed 8.7 Sq. Mt. 1 9 Methi B 3 9" Line 8.7 On Ginger Bed 8.7 Sq. Mt. 1 9 Onion B 4 9" X 4" 20.4 0 816 0.1 82 June Onion Onion B 4 9" X 4" 3 0 116 0.1 12 Onion Loki B 6 3 X 15 115.5 0 50 0.1 5 20-Jun Loki Sweet Potato B 5 1 X 1 6.38 0 58 1 0 Jul Cabbage B 5 1 X 1 6.38 0 58 1 0 S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 1 117 S. Potato S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 1 117 11-Feb 11-Jul S. Potato Brinjal H 3.5 3 X 3 49.5 0 55 0.1 6 16-Feb June Brinjal Palak B 3 Broadcast 20.5 On Loki Bed 20.5 Sq. Mt. 1 21 Mar June Palak Dhaniya B 2 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 1 7 May Dhaniya Dhaniya B 2 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 1 7 Dhaniya Dhaniya B 2 9" Line 17.7 On Ginger Bed 17.7 Sq. Mt. 1 18 Dhaniya Dhaniya B 2 9" Line 6.3 On Turmeric Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 1 6 Dhaniya Dhaniya B 2 9" Line 27.3 On Turmeric Bed 27.3 Sq. Mt. 1 27 Dhaniya Dhaniya B 2 9" Line 6.3 On Ginger Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 1 6 Dhaniya
  86. 86. 81 | P a g e Round - 5 Of Sowing ( 27th & 28th Month ) Amrut Mitti - 73 Beds ( 49,275 Ltr. ) & Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distanc(Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq.Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti ( Liters ) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Karela B 4 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0.1 3 11-Mar Jul Karela Galka B 4 3 X 6 41.1 0 30 0.1 3 Galka Sweet Potato B 5 1 X 1 4.5 0 43 1 43 15-Mar 16-Aug Potato Brinjal H 5 3 X 3 29.7 0 33 0.1 3 20-Mar 20-Aug Tomato Corn H 3.5 2 X 2 29.4 4725 63 0.1 6 Feb 11-May Free Space Onion B 4 9" X 4" 4 960 145 0.1 15 June Free Space Onion B 4 9" X 4" 2.7 648 104 0.1 10 June Free Space Guava H 30 X 30 60 { 150 Ltr. X 6 Plants ( 900 ) - Nursery Soil (650) } = 250 1 0 0 11-Feb New Crop Sitafal H 1 0 0 Mosambi H 1 0 0 Orange H 1 0 0 Lemon H 1 0 0 Mango H 1 0 0 Free Space 3 Broadcast -60 -1,026 43 Sq. Mt 0 0 Palak Free Space 3.5 1 X 1 0 -1,596 798 0 0 Mar Chana Free Space 4 9 " X 9 " -105.00 -3,696 1,848 0 0 Mar Wheat Musk Mellon B 4 3 X 15 88.88 4,266 35 0.1 4 Feb 21-Apr New Crop Water Melon B 4 3 X 15 88.88 4,266 35 0.1 4 Turiya B 4 3 X 15 88.88 4,266 35 0.1 4 Galka B 4 3 X 15 88.88 4,266 35 0.1 4 Lady Finger B 6 3 X 3 81.00 12,000 80 0.1 8 Aug Water Melon B 4 3 X 15 103.50 4,968 46 0.1 5 Mar 21-MayMusk Mellon B 4 3 X 15 103.50 4,968 46 0.1 5 Turiya B 4 3 X 15 103.50 4,968 46 0.1 5 Galka B 4 3 X 15 103.50 4,968 46 0.1 5 Pathways 46.1 Total 791.6 49,201 598 Note: The land/ beds are kept vacant after harvesting Chana (in the month of Feb). This free space is utilized in the 8th round of sowing biomass.
  87. 87. 82 | P a g e 7th Round of Biomass Cutting (Table 34, Fig. 15)  In the mid of 28th month, the 7th round of biomass will be harvested.  The area of 2,457 Sq. Mt. will yield 672 Kg. of Maize, 270 Kg. of Mustard and 270 Kg. of Dhaincha seeds. Out of which 11 Kg., 2 Kg and 2 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha shall be kept aside for next round of sowing.  Further during harvest 12,285 Kg. of green biomass shall be collected for preparing Amrut Mitti. Table 34 7th Round of Biomass Cutting ( Mid 28th Month ) Crop Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Yield Per (Sq. Mt.) in (Kg.) Total Yield Next Biomass Sowing Remaining Seeds Selling Price Total Income (Rs.)Area Seed Required Maize 2713 0.25 678 1276 6 672 10 6,724 Mustard 0.10 271 1 270 30 8,113 Dhaincha 0.10 271 1 270 20 5,408 Green Biomass from cutting (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 13,565 20,245 Figure 15
  88. 88. 83 | P a g e 8th Round of Biomass sowing (Table 35, Fig. 16)  The 8th round of biomass will be sown in the 29th month. Now the area available would be less than the 7th round, as some area will be utilized for heap making.  2,353 Sq. Mt. of area will be sown for biomass with 11 Kg., 2 Kg. & 2 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha respectively. Table 35 8th Round of Biomass Sowing ( 29th Month ) 0.54 Acer (2,353 Sq. Mt.) Crop Planting Distance (Sq. Ft.) Seeds Required for Rate Amount1000 Sq. Mt. 2,353 Sq. Mt. (Kg.) Maize To Be Broadcasted 4.60 11 From FieldMustard 0.69 2 Dhaincha 0.69 2 Labor ( sowing ) 5 Days or 1 Hrs. by Tractor 250 / day or 1250 / Hrs. 1,250 Irrigation 5 HP Motor Rs.7200 / Year 2,400 Labor ( harvesting ) 5 Days 250 / day 1,250 Amrut Jal 1 Ltr. / Sq. Mt. * 4 Times (At Time of Sowing & on 15th, 30th & 45th Day) Rs.0.17 / Ltr. 1,600 Total Cost. ( A ) 6,500
  89. 89. 84 | P a g e 7th Round of Heap Making (Table 36, Fig. 16)  The 7th round of heap making will start in 29th month. Pruning of some plants/ trees shall be carried out. At this point of time we will get green biomass from two sources (i.e. one from cultivation and other from pruning of trees). After drying 3,691 kg. (3,072 Kg. and 619 kg.) dry biomass will be available.  Out of this, some biomass will be kept aside for mulching @ 5% over heaps and 1 kg. per sq. mt. over upcoming crop balance will be used for making heaps.  Now 2,353 Sq. Mt. of area will be available for sowing biomass in the next round. Table 36 7th Round Heap Preparation (29th Month) 0.56 Acer (2,457 Sq. Mt.) Green Biomass (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 12,287 After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 3,072 Biomass To Be Used (Kg.) Dry Biomass - 5 % (Kept for Mulching on Heap) - 1 kg. / Sq. Mt. ( Kept For Mulching The Upcoming Crop Sowing) 2,578 Biomass From Live Fencing Gliricidia - 12.5Kg * 141 Plant = 1763 Kg 2,474Jatropa - 8.5Kg * 68 Plant = 578 Kg Ardusi - 1Kg * 133 Plant = 133 Kg After Drying (Kg.) 25 % of Green Biomass 619 No of Heaps 150 Kg. / Heap 21 Amount Of Amrut Mitti Prepared by Heaps in (Liters) 25 Cu. Ft./ Heap & 27 Ltr./ Cu. Ft 14,384 Area Required to Make Heaps (Sq. Mt.) In Addition to Previous Area -235 Area Required for Next Crop Sowing ( As Per Planning ) 340 Area Left For Next Sowing (Sq. Mt.) 2,457 (Total Area) - 104 (Area Required For Heap Making) - 482 ( Remaining 50 % Area of Coverage Of Previous Round Heaps) 2,353 Cost of Heap Making (B) Rs. 650 / Heap 13,650
  90. 90. 85 | P a g e Round 5.1 of Crop Sowing (Table 37, Fig. 16) This round of sowing crop will start in 29th and 30th month. In this round, plants/crops will be sown on the existing beds of Amrut Mitti which have fallen vacant after harvest. Table 37 Round - 5.1 Of Sowing ( 29th & 30th Month ) Amrut Mitti - Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Liters) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Lady Finger H 6 3 X 3 32.4 0 36 0.1 4 April Oct Tomato Loki B 6 3 X 6 41.1 0 30 0.1 3 20-Aug Loki Dhaniya B 3 Broadcast 23.2 On Karela Bed 23.2 Sq. Mt. 1 23 July Dhaniya Kaddu B 4 3 X 8 49.5 0 20 0.1 2 20-Jun Karela Kaddu B 4 3 X 15 115.5 0 52 0.1 5 20-Jun Water Melon Jowar H 3.5 2 X 2 14.4 0 36 0.1 4 11-Apr Aug Corn Chilly H 4.5 3 X 3 29.7 0 33 0.1 3 15-Apr Sep Chilly Chilly H 4.5 3 X 3 16.2 0 18 0.1 2 Sep Chilly Free Space B 3 Broadcast 14.9 On Karela Bed 14.9 Sq. Mt. 0 0 20-Apr Aug Dhaniya Kaddu B 4 3 X 15 88.88 0 35 0.1 4 21-Apr 10-Jul Musk Mellon Kaddu B 4 3 X 15 88.88 0 35 0.1 4 10-Jul Water Melon Turiya B 4 3 X 15 88.88 0 35 0.1 4 10-Jul Turiya Galka B 4 3 X 15 88.88 0 35 0.1 4 10-Jul Galka Ginger B 10 1.5 X 1.5 8.25 0 30 0.1 3 May Mar Cabbage Brinjal H 3.5 3 X 3 16.2 0 18 0.1 2 16-Aug Brinjal S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 1 117 Oct RadishS. Potato B 5 1 X 1 11 0 117 1 117 Oct S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 2.7 0 26 1 26 Oct Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 13.5 0 60 5 300 May Turmeric Ginger B 10 1.5 X 1.5 13.5 0 60 5 300 May Ginger Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 10.2 0 45 5 225 May Turmeric Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 10.2 0 45 5 225 May Turmeric
  91. 91. 86 | P a g e Round - 5.1 Of Sowing ( 29th & 30th Month ) Amrut Mitti - Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Liters) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Ginger B 10 1.5 X 1.5 26.7 0 118 5 590 May May Ginger Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 9.9 0 44 5 220 May Turmeric Turmeric B 10 1.5 X 1.5 41.4 0 184 5 920 May Turmeric Ginger B 10 1.5 X 1.5 9.9 0 44 5 220 May Ginger Moong B 2 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq.Mt. 1 7 July Dhaniya Moong B 2 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq.Mt. 1 7 July Dhaniya Moong B 2 9" Line 17.7 On Ginger Bed 17.7 Sq.Mt. 1 18 July Dhaniya Moong B 2 9" Line 6.3 On Turmeric Bed 6.3 Sq.Mt. 1 6 July Dhaniya Moong B 2 9" Line 27.3 On Turmeric Bed 27.3 Sq.Mt. 1 27 July Dhaniya Moong B 2 9" Line 6.3 On Ginger Bed 6.3 Sq.Mt. 1 6 July Dhaniya Moong B 2 9" Line 8.7 On Turmeric Bed 8.7 Sq.Mt. 1 9 July Methi Moong B 2 9" Line 8.7 On Ginger Bed 8.7 Sq.Mt. 1 9 July Jowar H 3.5 2 X 2 29.4 0 63 0.1 6 11-May Sep Corn S. Potato B 5 1 X 1 8.05 0 90 1 90 21-May 21-Oct Potato S. Potato B 10.35 0 113 1 113 21-Oct Kaddu B 4 3 X 15 103.50 0 46 0.1 5 10-Aug Water Melon Kaddu B 4 3 X 15 103.50 0 46 0.1 5 10-Aug Musk Melon Turiya B 4 3 X 15 103.50 0 46 0.1 5 10-Aug Turiya Galka B 4 3 X 15 103.50 0 46 0.1 5 10-Aug Galka Turmeric H 12 1 X 1 0 Around Fruit Plant 312 5 1560 May May New Crop Total 5,201
  92. 92. 87 | P a g e Figure 16
  93. 93. 88 | P a g e 5th Round of Crop Harvest: This round will take place from 29th till 31st month. The yield and income are as per Table 38; Table 38 Round - 5 Of Crop Cultivation ( 29th - 31st Month ) Crop Canopy Area (Sq. Ft.) Number of Plants Yield Total Yield (Kg.) Selling Price Income Month Of Harvest Per Acer Per Sq. Ft. (Kg.) Chilly 9 33 8,889 0.22 66 20 1,320 Half of AprilChilly 9 18 8,889 0.22 36 20 720 Corn 4 36 4,000 0.10 14 10 144 Karela 24 34 20,000 0.50 408 10 4,080 End of April Galka 18 30 80,000 2 1,080 10 10,800 Dhaniya 149 14.9 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 37 20 745 Cabbage 2.25 38 18,000 0.45 38 15 577 Potato 1 90 40,000 1.00 90 10 900 113 40,000 1.00 0 10 0 Brinjal 9 18 53,333 1.33 216 10 2,160 Radish 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 1 26 40,000 1.00 26 10 260 Methi 87 8.7 Sq. Mt. 8,000 0.20 17 20 348 Methi 87 8.7 Sq. Mt. 8,000 0.20 17 20 348 Turmeric 2.25 60 40,000 1.00 135 50 6,750 2.25 45 40,000 1 101 50 5,063 2.25 45 40,000 1 101 50 5,063 2.25 44 40,000 1 99 50 4,950 2.25 184 40,000 1 414 50 20,700 Table Continued….
  94. 94. 89 | P a g e Round - 5 Of Crop Cultivation ( 29th - 31st Month ) Crop Canopy Area (Sq. Ft.) Number of Plants Yield Total Yield (Kg.) Selling Price Income Month Of Harvest Per Acer Per Sq. Ft. (Kg.) Ginger 2.25 60 40,000 1.00 135 50 6,750 End of April 2.25 118 40,000 1 266 50 13,275 2.25 44 40,000 1 99 50 4,950 Dhaniya 67.5 6.75 Sq. Mt. 3,200 0.08 5 20 108 67.5 6.75 Sq. Mt. 3,200 0.08 5 20 108 177 17.7 Sq. Mt. 3,200 0.08 14 20 283 63 6.3 Sq. Mt. 3,200 0.08 5 20 101 273 27.3 Sq. Mt. 3,200 0.08 22 20 437 63 6.3 Sq. Mt. 3,200 0.08 5 20 101 Karela 24 20 20,000 0.50 240 10 2,400 Half of May Loki 18 30 80,000 2 1,080 10 10,800 Water Mellon 45 52 40,000 1 2,340 10 23,400 Corn 4 63 4,000 0.10 25 10 252 Onion 0.25 816 28,000 0.70 143 10 1,428 End of May Onion 0.25 116 28,000 0.70 20 10 203 Brinjal 9 55 53,333 1.33 660 10 6,600 Palak 205 20.5 Sq. Mt. 12,000 0.30 62 25 1,538 Onion 0.25 145 28,000 0.70 25 10 254 Onion 0.25 104 28,000 0.70 18 10 182 Musk Mellon 45 35 28,000 0.70 1,103 10 11,025 Water Mellon 45 35 40,000 1.00 1,575 10 15,750 Turiya 45 35 80,000 2 3,150 10 31,500 Galka 45 35 80,000 2 3,150 10 31,500 Dhaniya 232 23.2 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 58 20 1,160 End of June Sweet Potato 1 58 40,000 1.00 58 10 580 1 58 40,000 1.00 58 10 580 Table Continued….
  95. 95. 90 | P a g e Round - 5 Of Crop Cultivation ( 29th - 31st Month ) Crop Canopy Area (Sq. Ft.) Number of Plants Yield Total Yield (Kg.) Selling Price Income Month Of Harvest Per Acer Per Sq. Ft. (Kg.) Dhaniya 232 23.2 Sq. Mt. 10,000 0.25 58 20 1,160 End of June Sweet Potato 1 58 40,000 1.00 58 10 580 1 58 40,000 1.00 58 10 580 Sweet Potato 1 117 40,000 1.00 117 10 1,170 Water Mellon 45 46 40,000 1.00 2,070 10 20,700 Musk Mellon 45 46 28,000 0.70 1,449 10 14,490 Turiya 45 46 80,000 2 4,140 10 41,400 Galka 45 46 80,000 2 4,140 10 41,400 Moong 67.5 6.75 Sq. Mt. 400 0.01 0.68 50 34 67.5 6.75 Sq. Mt. 400 0.01 0.68 50 34 177 17.7 Sq. Mt. 400 0.01 1.77 50 89 63 6.3 Sq. Mt. 400 0.01 0.63 50 32 273 27.3 Sq. Mt. 400 0.01 2.73 50 137 63 6.3 Sq. Mt. 400 0.01 0.63 50 32 87 8.7 Sq. Mt. 400 0.01 0.87 50 44 87 8.7 Sq. Mt. 400 0.01 0.87 50 44 Total 29,378 3,52,133 Note: The production of Dhaniya is less, as it is harvested within 2 months of cultivation (at the end of April).
  96. 96. 91 | P a g e 6th Round of Crop Sowing (Table 39, Fig. 17) This round will start in 31st and 32nd month. Major sowing will be carried out on the already existed beds of Amrut Mitti. As the canopy of trees/ plants would enlarge by this time, some more Amrut Mitti is added around its roots. On this added Mitti, turmeric will be sown around these trees. The turmeric can grow under shade of tree without sacrificing yield. Table 39 Round - 6 Of Sowing ( 31st & 32nd Month ) Amrut Mitti - 72 Beds ( 48600 Ltr. ) & Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance ( Ft. ) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti ( Liters ) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Cost Of Plant Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Onion B 4 9" X 4" 20.4 0 816 0.1 82 June Oct Onion Onion B 4 9" X 4" 3 0 116 0.1 12 Oct Onion Brinjal H 3.5 3 X 3 49.5 0 55 0.1 6 16-Sep Brinjal Palak B 3 Broadcast 20.5 On Loki Bed 20.5 Sq. Mt. 1 21 Sep Palak Onion B 4 9" X 4" 4 145 0.1 15 Oct Onion Onion B 4 9" X 4" 2.7 104 0.1 10 Oct Onion Loki B 6 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0.1 3 5-Jun 25-Oct Loki Loki B 6 3 X 15 49.5 0 22 0.1 2 25-Oct Loki Loki B 6 3 X 15 115.5 0 50 0.1 5 20-Jun 10-Nov Loki Karela B 4 3 X 15 115.5 0 52 0.1 5 20-Jun 10-Sep Kaddu Karela B 4 3 X 8 49.5 0 20 0.1 2 20-Jun 10-Nov Kaddu Radish B 3 1 X 1 6.38 0 58 0.1 6 Jul Oct S. Potato B 3 1 X 1 6.38 0 58 0.1 6 Oct Radish B 3 1 X 1 11 0 117 0.1 12 Oct S. Potato Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 1 7 July Oct Moong Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.75 On Turmeric Bed 6.75 Sq. Mt. 1 7 July Oct Moong Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 17.7 On Ginger Bed 17.7 Sq. Mt. 1 18 July Oct Moong Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.3 On Turmeric Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 1 6 July Oct Moong Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 27.3 On Turmeric Bed 27.3 Sq. Mt. 1 27 July Oct Moong Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 6.3 On Ginger Bed 6.3 Sq. Mt. 1 6 July Oct Moong Dhaniya B 3 9" Line 8.7 On Ginger Bed 8.7 Sq. Mt. 1 9 July Oct Moong Dhaniya B 3 Broadcast 23.2 On Karela Bed 23.2 Sq. Mt. 1 23 July Oct Dhaniya Table Continued….
  97. 97. 92 | P a g e Round - 6 Of Sowing ( 31st & 32nd Month ) Amrut Mitti - 72 Beds ( 48600 Ltr. ) & Previous Sowing Crop Sowing Type Crop Life (Months) Planting Distance (Ft.) Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Required Amrut Mitti (Liters) Number of Plants Cost Per Plant Total Plantation Month Next Crop Month Crop Replaced Cost Of Plant Dhaniya B 3 Broadcast 6 On Ginger Bed 6 Sq. Mt. 1 6 July Oct New Crop Karela B 4 3 X 8 41.2 0 34 0.1 3 Jul 20-Sep Karela Galka B 4 3 X 6 41.1 0 30 0.1 3 20-Sep Galka Free Space B 4 3 X 15 88.88 0 35 0 0 10-Jul Jan Kaddu Free Space B 4 3 X 15 88.88 0 35 0 0 10-Jul Jan Kaddu Turiya B 4 3 X 15 88.88 0 35 0.1 4 10-Jul Oct Turiya Galka B 4 3 X 15 88.88 0 35 0.1 4 10-Jul Oct Galka Radish B 3 1 X 1 11 0 117 0.1 12 11-Jul 11-Oct S. Potato Free Space 3.5 1 X 1 -80 0 798 0 0 Mar Chana Guava H 30 X 30 108 Diameter of Amrut Mitti Circle Increased to 6 Ft. { 435 Ltr. X 78 Plants } = 33,930 13 0 0 June Sitafal H 13 0 0 Mosambi H 13 0 0 Orange H 13 0 0 Lemon H 13 0 0 Mango H 13 0 0 Drumsticks H 15 X 15 308 14,575 55 1 55 Turmeric H 10 1 X 1 0 Around Fruit Plant 936 5 4,680 May New Crop Turmeric H 10 1 X 1 0 Around Drumsticks 440 5 2,200 May New Crop Pathways 0 Total 336.0 48,505 7,264
  98. 98. 93 | P a g e 8th Round of Biomass Cutting (Table 40, Fig. 17)  In the mid of 32nd month, the 8th round of biomass will be harvested.  The area of 2,353 Sq. Mt. will yield 314 Kg. of Maize, 127 Kg. of Mustard and 127 Kg. of Dhaincha seeds. Out of which 5 Kg., 1 Kg and 1 Kg. seeds of Maize, Mustard and Dhaincha shall be kept aside for next round of sowing.  Further during harvest 11,765 Kg. of green biomass shall be collected for preparing Amrut Mitti. Table 40 8th Round of Biomass Cutting ( Mid 32nd Month ) Crop Sowing Area (Sq. Mt.) Yield Per (Sq. Mt.) in (Kg.) Total Yield Next Biomass Sowing Remaining Seeds Selling Price Total Income (Rs.) Area Seed Required Maize 1276 0.25 319 992 5 314 10 3,144 Mustard 0.10 128 1 127 30 3,807 Dhaincha 0.10 128 1 127 20 2,538 Green Biomass from cutting (Kg.) 5 Kg. / Sq. Mt. 6,380 9,490 Figure 17

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