Mini-projects

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Mini-projects

  1. 1. A I P ro g ra m m ing Week Nine The Mini Project Richard Price rmp@ cs.bham.ac.uk www.cs.bham.ac.uk/internal/courses/ai-prog-a/
  2. 2. R ec a p • Errors: – Syntax errors. – Compile-time. – Runtime. – Bugs/Semantic errors. • Debugging: – Mishaps help you track down errors. – Print out your variables. – Use the trace tool. 2
  3. 3. T he M ini-P ro jec t • Basic idea: – Design, plan and develop a solid piece of work. – Write a report explaining your work. • To create a relatively large program – Larger than weekly assessed work. – Opportunity to express yourself and do something creative. • Worth 50% of your AI Programming A mark. – Your weekly assessments have now ended for this term. – They are also worth 50% in total. – Will be fully marked before the end of term. • Essentially we want you to condense what you’ve learnt into a single piece of work. 3
  4. 4. T im e S c a le • Deadlines: – Plan: Monday 1 st December 5pm. – Project: Tuesday 1 3th January 5pm. 4
  5. 5. T he s m a ll print… • Plan: – Myself and/ the demonstrators will be talking to you during lab sessions. or – Office hour Monday’s 2pm. • Deadline 1 3th January 2009: – Immediate 5% penalty for lateness. – Every three days afterwards is another 5% . – No submissions accepted after 27th January. – Extensions should be requested through the Welfare team. – For medical reasons or similar. 5
  6. 6. P la n - 10% • A description of the problem. – Does not have to be a complete description. • Summary of your program. – What parts of the problem will it solve. • W hat will it do? – Examples of it’s behaviour. – What knowledge of the real- word does it need to know. • Program’s ontology. – How will this knowledge be stored. • Database, lists, variables? • Suitable Format? – A general breakdown of the program. • How do the blocks inter-relate? • A timetable. • Around two A4 pages in length. 6
  7. 7. T he P ro g ra m - 45% • Needs to be readable. • Use comments. – Explain what it does. – Is it clever? – What should it do if it doesn’t work. • Sensible variable and procedure names. • Break down your code. – A lot! • If you use someone else’s code highlight this. • Term ends on December 1 2th. – Get the help of the demonstrators until then. 7
  8. 8. T he R epo rt - 45% • Why is this a useful program? Motivation: • Examples of the program working. Illustration: • What where the problems encountered? E xplanation: How did you solve them? • How do use your program? Instructions: • Report on other peoples work which may be similar. R elated work: • Possibilities for future work? Limitations : • Summarise what has been done. C onclusions: What could have been done differently? • List your sources. B ibliography: • I would like to thank… Acknowledgements: • Your program. Appendix A: • Additional trace output, examples. Appendix B : • 2000 words not counting Bibliography, acknowledgements and appendices. 8
  9. 9. T he R epo rt - 45% • The emphasis is on the explanation. • Describe separately: – What you did. – How you did it. – Why you did it that way. • Create a story. • Refer to figures, illustrations etc. • Acknowledge other peoples work. – Explanation of related work is important. • Use a spell checker and get it proof read. 9

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