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Capacity development:
Our generic learning –
applicable to migration support
Volker Hauck, Head of Programme
Conflict, Sec...
 “CD” – some conceptual points of departure
 Where we are coming from
 Key lessons learnt
 More talk than walk?
 Towa...
... for clarification:
Capacity - A property in its own right ... Is the ability of
people, organisations and society as...
“CD” – a simplistic thinking model
Subject of considerable intellectual effort over past 25+
years => sophisticated ideas developed, challenging the
mainstr...
Concerns about shaping effective national development
processes already present implicitly in Marshall plan
Period of de...
Early efforts at state building through transplantation were
not working: new approaches needed with more emphasis
on pro...
1990’s & 2000’s: development of aid effectiveness agenda
=> OECD-DAC’s (Informal Network on Institutional and
Capacity De...
An informed language and terminology: consensus to look at
capacity from interrelated individual, organisational, larger
...
Dealing with complexity: Those who aim to enhance capacity,
are challenged to understand how capacity develops
endogenous...
Has influenced international debates and guidance => aid
effectiveness agenda; NGO thinking & practice; climate
adaptatio...
Lessons applied: the TTI programme (1)
Thorough investigation of context ahead of intervention
Support through a flexible, incremental and more open ended
proc...
A changing international playing field – new development
actors; growing domestic resources; more diversification of
deve...
Enhanced cross-sector collaboration and private sector
engagement; growth of multi-actor development partnerships
Increa...
Thank you
www.ecdpm.org
www.slideshare.net/ecdpm
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Migration - delivering capacity building to EU partner countries

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The added value and relevance of capacity building facilities in the area of migration. Presentation by Volker Hauck at 'Advancing Migration Cooperation through Demand-Driven Capacity Building: MIEUX's Peer-to-Peer Approach' a conference hosted by the International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD).

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Migration - delivering capacity building to EU partner countries

  1. 1. Capacity development: Our generic learning – applicable to migration support Volker Hauck, Head of Programme Conflict, Security and Resilience ICMPD Capacity Development Workshop, 23 September 2015, Brussels
  2. 2.  “CD” – some conceptual points of departure  Where we are coming from  Key lessons learnt  More talk than walk?  Towards the future Overview
  3. 3. ... for clarification: Capacity - A property in its own right ... Is the ability of people, organisations and society as a whole to manage their affairs successfully = result Capacity development - An endogenous process, by which people, organisations and society as a whole strengthen, create, adapt and maintain capacity over time = process Capacity development support - refers to what outside partners to a change process (domestic or foreign) can do to support, facilitate or catalyse capacity development = input Three conceptual markers ...
  4. 4. “CD” – a simplistic thinking model
  5. 5. Subject of considerable intellectual effort over past 25+ years => sophisticated ideas developed, challenging the mainstream: research, evaluations, methodologies, expert working groups, etc. => a practice area CD as at the heart of good development theory and practice concerned with sustainability and empowerment – yet has always struggled to gain centre stage, and legitimacy– while a cliché, it is in essence about “teaching a man to fish” Has a multi-disciplinary “DNA” – with roots in community development; participation; political science/ governance and public admin; management sciences; human security; systems thinking; complexity theory; resilience … “CD” – in a nutshell
  6. 6. Concerns about shaping effective national development processes already present implicitly in Marshall plan Period of decolonisation (1960’s & 1970’s): helping young nations - focus on institution building, infrastructure development and training – statebuilding in cold war context 1980’s & 1990’s: growing appreciation of local context, participation, partnership, political economy, role of donors Early 1990’s: strong criticism about effectiveness of technical cooperation for CD (UNDP’s “Berg Report” - 1993) 1990’s & 2000’s: emerging concerns about conflict & fragility and human security (Somalia; Rwanda; Bosnia) “CD” – a close relationship with aid (1)
  7. 7. Early efforts at state building through transplantation were not working: new approaches needed with more emphasis on process, acknowledging context & the politics of change Institutions and good government matter: if the right policies are to be developed and implemented, can’t just focus on the hardware Empowerment and participation essential: necessary to avoid dependency, promote sustainability, develop local leadership and build ownership at all levels Development is an endogenous process: there is only so much external partners can do; how to engage is critical Technical Assistance effective only, if demand driven “CD” discourse recognized that ...
  8. 8. 1990’s & 2000’s: development of aid effectiveness agenda => OECD-DAC’s (Informal Network on Institutional and Capacity Development): Rome, Paris, Accra & Busan HLF’s Paris Declaration (2005): five aid effectiveness principles – ownership; alignment; harmonisation; focus on results; and mutual accountability DAC Good Practice Paper (2006): stocktaking and consensus on how to understand “CD” and what constitutes good practice Busan 2011: “New Deal for Engagement in Fragile Environments” – peace & statebuilding: legitimate politics; justice; security; economic foundations; revenues & services “CD” – a close relationship with aid (2)
  9. 9. An informed language and terminology: consensus to look at capacity from interrelated individual, organisational, larger system levels; (hard) tangibles as well as (soft) intangibles matter (relevant for support; monitoring & evaluation) Ownership of change: As a principle, stakeholders, their organisations and networks need to drive their own capacity development processes; and request for assistance if needed Context: To strengthen capacity, one needs to understand and respect the existing competencies and capabilities, multi-actor engagements, development processes and political context already in place Six key lessons from CD (1)
  10. 10. Dealing with complexity: Those who aim to enhance capacity, are challenged to understand how capacity develops endogenously over time (and invest in it) Working through multiple entry points and tools: from individual HR development to OD to more holistic notions of institutional reform and societal transformation => need to think more strategically about purpose, entry points & change Aid practices and behaviour: Adapt rules, hierarchies and accountability mechanisms to create space for stakeholders to improvise and find out-of-the-box solutions Six key lessons from CD (2)
  11. 11. Has influenced international debates and guidance => aid effectiveness agenda; NGO thinking & practice; climate adaptation, migration, finance, etc. Is more prominent in African development discourse => ACBF capacity indicators; AUC training; ECA CD Strategy Consensus among DP’s around the 2006 DAC Good Practice paper, but implementation patchy Testing of new aid modalities, more aligned with country processes (pooled funding, [sector] budget support) Design and use of new assessment frameworks to monitor CD progress, such as the 5C’s (Core Capabilities Framework) “CD” – all talk, but what about action?
  12. 12. Lessons applied: the TTI programme (1)
  13. 13. Thorough investigation of context ahead of intervention Support through a flexible, incremental and more open ended process – taking into account different political contexts Applying a theory of change, stressing strategic engagement for change, not bound by a rigid logical framework Taking risks through provision of core funding to individual think tanks, but accompanied through close monitoring Focus on learning and innovation - demand led CD support Multi-donor engagement through pooled funding Lessons applied: the TTI programme (2)
  14. 14. A changing international playing field – new development actors; growing domestic resources; more diversification of development finance; growing South-South cooperation More Southern leadership in capacity development in search for home-grown agenda’s and change strategies ... ... but traditional capacity development support remains a supply driven domain – however, role of donors will diminish Shifting interest to support the demand-side for change => civil society, parliaments, etc. as drivers for societal transformation, voicing claims for downward accountability Towards the future – key trends (1)
  15. 15. Enhanced cross-sector collaboration and private sector engagement; growth of multi-actor development partnerships Increasing diversity of sources of knowledge, harmonization of knowledge standards; ease of access through modern information technology Special attention to fragile states will remain top priority; application of innovative approaches difficult, though intense learning informs current practice (e.g., DEVCO: EU trust funds; state building contracts; comprehensive approach; etc.) Growing attention to CD and coherence issues (e.g., between climate adaptation, disaster management and peacebuilding) Towards the future – key trends (2)
  16. 16. Thank you www.ecdpm.org www.slideshare.net/ecdpm Page *

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