Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Resourcd File

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Resourcd File

  1. 1.  TV is perhaps the most obvious medium through which persuasive messages are presented Attempts to persuade on TV
  2. 2.  Describe the different ways television is used to persuade  Understand the psychological principles used in television advertising and persuasion  Outline the effectiveness of advertising
  3. 3.  Oskamp (1988): argued that TV adverts are a powerful influence on attitudes  Taras et al (1989): noted that children’s requests for certain foods correlate strongly with the amount of TV advertising the product is receiving.
  4. 4.  The Hovland-Yale model argues that we can understand attitude change by considering it as a ...................................  The first stage in the sequence is ................., we must notice the attempt to persuade.  The second stage is ..........................., we must understand what the advert is telling us  The third stage is ................, the individual must react to the message  Therefore persuasion takes place in ............... Sequential process comprehension Attention stages reactance
  5. 5.  In order for adverts, campaigns or political broadcasts to work, they have to grab attention  Adverts, such as, “get hooked campaigns”, Cadburys, drumming gorilla grab attention as they use eye-catching or iconic images!!  Olney, holbrook and batra (1991): measured channel hopping during adverts and found that unique eye-catching adverts captured watchers attention Can you think or any other adverts which really grab your attention?
  6. 6.  Comprehension is extremely important in relation to attitude change in political and health campaigns- why?  It is much less important in TV advertisements  Based on systematic and heuristic processing What is systematic processing and heuristic processing?
  7. 7. Watch these adverts and decide what the message is.....
  8. 8.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVblWq3 tDwY  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJ0hCFrx 4lg
  9. 9.  Many adverts encourage heuristic processing- the main message is obscure and has to be worked out. They entertain as well as inform  In political and health campaigns they use systematic processing. The messages should be clear and simple.  For complex messages, written forms are more effective than TV
  10. 10.  Based on reactance of Hovland-Yale model  Once an advert has been noticed, the aim is to create a favourable evaluation of the product you are selling  This is done by association through classical conditioning  Many food/ drinks adverts play on association with laid back, relaxed, sunny afternoons- think of some examples?
  11. 11. =PAIRING
  12. 12.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=- reVUJzMnx0
  13. 13.  How can you explain the Andrex toilet tissue advert in relation to this classical conditioning diagram  UCS UCR ..................... ........................  NS+ UCS (Pairing) UCR ................+.............. .. ....................  CS CR ...................... ........................  Lynx advert http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCZ-6y2UEfM
  14. 14.  Another way in which classical conditioning works is through the use of music  Examples= “we buy any car”, “compare the market.com”  Music has been used in political campaigns, “things can only get better” in the general election in 2007
  15. 15.  Repetition!!  Zajonc (1968): found that familiarity is an important part of liking, and devised from this the mere exposure hypothesis. The more we see, the more we like it!!  Tellis (1987): adverts should be repeated two or three times a week if possible  Giving very short clips of adverts before and after films and shows has increased exposure
  16. 16.  What adverts have been shown before and after the following shows?...  Friends  Hollyoaks  X-factor
  17. 17.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4L3bm6 m3KQ
  18. 18.  Advertisers cannot personalise their adverts, but they can make use of ‘ready made’ relationships that exist between viewers and well known celebrities (parasocial relationships) to promote their product  Examples?  Giles (2002): celebrities provide a familiar face which we feel we can trust. This leads us to be more likely to buy the product!
  19. 19.  BUT- O’Mahony and Meenaghan (1997) found that in general, celebrity endorsements are not regarded as effective!  A Gillet advert featuring, Roger Federa, Thierry Henry and Tiger Woods was named the worst TV advert of the year by advertising magazine ‘Campaign’!  Martin et al (2008) found that their student participants were more convinced by a TV endorsement from a fictional fellow student when buying a digital camera, than by one from a celebrity
  20. 20. A) OPERANT CONDITIONING B) CLASSICAL CONDITIONING C) BEHAVIOURISM
  21. 21. A) HEURISTIC PROCESSING B) SYSTEMATIC PROCESSING C) CENTRAL PROCESSING
  22. 22. A) The advert grabs attention B) The advert is repeated C) The advert is comprehended
  23. 23. A) UNIQUE B) EYE-CATCHING C) ALL OF THE ABOVE
  24. 24. A) Parasocial relationships B) Celebrity endorsements C) Product endorsements

    Be the first to comment

    Login to see the comments

Views

Total views

42

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

0

Actions

Downloads

0

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×