Ofsted - Fact or Fiction?
Are these statements true or false?
True / False
1 Ofsted will no longer inspect outstanding sch...
Ofsted - Fact or Fiction?
Are these statements true or false?
True / False
1 Ofsted will no longer inspect outstanding sch...
Explanation
1 ‘Outstanding’ and ‘good’ schools
The frequency of school inspections depends on the findings of a school’s p...
5 The word “differentiation” is not used at all. However, as teachers are required to
meet the individual needs of all the...
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Resourcd File

  1. 1. Ofsted - Fact or Fiction? Are these statements true or false? True / False 1 Ofsted will no longer inspect outstanding schools. 2 A school can be outstanding with good teaching. 3 Inspectors expect to see lesson plans. 4 Inspectors expect to see planned lessons. 5 The word “differentiation” is used a number of times in the new schedule. 6 Inspectors count up the proportion of outstanding, good, requires improvement and inadequate lessons to arrive at the overall judgement for teaching. 7 When inspectors feedback on lesson observations, they ask teachers about their CPD and performance management. 8 Inspectors judge the quality of teaching ‘over time’. 9 Inspectors compare their lesson observation judgements on teachers against those of the school. 10 If literacy (reading, writing and communication) and/or numeracy are not well supported in a lesson, it is likely to be judged inadequate. 11 Inspectors expect to see 3 or 4 part lessons, with starters and plenaries. 12 Didactic teaching will very likely lead to a judgement of inadequate. 13 It is the duty of every teacher, regardless of the subject they teach, to promote high standards of literacy. 14 The descriptors are “best fit” for outstanding, good and requires improvement. Eden Education Eden Education
  2. 2. Ofsted - Fact or Fiction? Are these statements true or false? True / False 1 Ofsted will no longer inspect outstanding schools. False 2 A school can be outstanding with good teaching. False 3 Inspectors expect to see lesson plans. False 4 Inspectors expect to see planned lessons. True 5 The word “differentiation” is used a number of times in the new schedule. False 6 Inspectors count up the proportion of outstanding, good, requires improvement and inadequate lessons to arrive at the overall judgement for teaching. False 7 When inspectors feedback on lesson observations, they ask teachers about their CPD and performance management. True 8 Inspectors judge the quality of teaching ‘over time’. True 9 Inspectors compare their lesson observation judgements on teachers against those of the school. True 10 If literacy (reading, writing and communication) and/or numeracy are not well supported in a lesson, it is likely to be judged inadequate. True 11 Inspectors expect to see 3 or 4 part lessons, with starters and plenaries. False 12 Didactic teaching will very likely lead to a judgement of inadequate. False 13 It is the duty of every teacher, regardless of the subject they teach, to promote high standards of literacy. True 14 The descriptors are “best fit” for outstanding, good and requires improvement. False Eden Education
  3. 3. Explanation 1 ‘Outstanding’ and ‘good’ schools The frequency of school inspections depends on the findings of a school’s previous inspection(s). For a school judged at their last inspection to be ‘good’, the timing of its next section 5 inspection is determined by a risk assessment of its subsequent performance. Exempt schools are also subject to risk assessment. The risk assessment process begins in the third school year after the most recent section 5 inspection, and for ‘outstanding’ schools is conducted annually thereafter. In conducting a risk assessment, Ofsted analyses:  pupils’ academic achievement over time, taking account of both attainment and progress  pupils’ attendance  the outcomes of any inspections, such as survey inspections, carried out by Ofsted since the last routine inspection  the views of parents, including those shown by Parent View, an online questionnaire for parents  qualifying complaints about the school referred to Ofsted by parents or carers  any other significant concerns that are brought to Ofsted’s attention. If the risk assessment process raises concerns about the performance of an exempt school it may be inspected at any time after the completion of the risk assessment. If no concerns are raised from the risk assessment the school will not be informed. In addition, exempt schools may be inspected between risk assessments where:  safeguarding and/or welfare concerns suggest that it should be inspected  a subject or thematic survey inspection raises more general concerns  Ofsted has received a qualifying complaint about a school, which, taken alongside other available evidence, suggests that it would be appropriate to inspect the school  where HMCI or the Secretary of State has concerns about a school’s performance. From the Framework for School Inspection (Sept 2012) 2 To be judged outstanding, a school must have outstanding teaching. 3 Teachers are not obliged to give lesson plans to inspectors (although it can be helpful if they do). 4 Inspectors do expect to see well planned lessons, however, that lead to good learning and progress for all pupils.
  4. 4. 5 The word “differentiation” is not used at all. However, as teachers are required to meet the individual needs of all the pupils they teach, the need for effective differentiation is obvious and inspectors will look for evidence of this during observations. If “Learning activities are not sufficiently well matched to the needs of pupils”, teaching is likely to be inadequate. From the SchoolInspection Handbook (Sept 2012) 6 Inspectors do not count up lesson judgements to arrive at an overall judgement on the quality of teaching: “The judgement on the quality of teaching must take account of evidence f pupils’ learning and progress over time. Inspectors must not simply aggregate the grades awarded following lesson observations.” From the SchoolInspection Handbook (Sept 2012) 7 Formal feedback on lesson inspections will be recorded on an Evidence Form. Inspectors will ask teachers about their experience of school lesson observations, recommendations made for improvement, CPD to meet these needs and how this links in with the performance management process and targets. 8 See number 6 above. 9 Inspectors usually ask the school to provide its own records of lesson observations, so that Inspectors can see if the inspection judgements are in line with the school’s own judgements. 10 Teaching is likely to be inadequate where any of the following apply: - Pupils cannot communicate, read, write, or apply mathematics as well as they should From the SchoolInspection Handbook (Sept 2012) 11 Inspectors must not expect teaching staff to teach in any specific way or follow a prescribed methodology. From the SchoolInspection Handbook (Sept 2012) 12 See 11 above. 13 Teachers must “Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge: • demonstrate an understanding of and take responsibility for promoting high standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialist subject” From the Teachers Standards (Sept 2012) 14 Best fit applies to Outstanding and Good judgements only.

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