EXAM DATES 2015
PSYA1 11th
May 2015
PSYA2 18th
May 2015
Welcome to year 12 and the study of psychology. You have chosen one of the
most popular A levels studied throughout the co...
Organisation and Expectations
What you need to bring to class every lesson
A4 Lever arch folder with dividers – this must ...
How to get ahead in psychology
These are a few tips for enhancing your study of psychology.
1. After each lesson review th...
A note about plagiarism
What is it?
Plagiarism is when you copy the work of another and pass it off as your own. It
is a v...
How can you avoid plagiarism?
By following these simple tips, you should be able to avoid plagiarism.
 Do use the interne...
Specification for AS Examinations to be taken Summer 2014
PSYA1 Written paper 1 hour 30 minutes
Models of memory •
 The m...
Investigation design Candidates should be familiar with the following features
of investigation design:
• Aims
• Hypothese...
PSYA2 Written paper 1 hour 30 minutes
Biological Psychology - Stress as a bodily response
• The body’s response to stress,...
Assessment Objectives
In the exams, you will be tested on three different assessment objectives.
These can be seen as “ski...
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  1. 1. EXAM DATES 2015 PSYA1 11th May 2015 PSYA2 18th May 2015
  2. 2. Welcome to year 12 and the study of psychology. You have chosen one of the most popular A levels studied throughout the country. So why have you chosen psychology? There could be all number of reasons you selected this subject. These could be as diverse as that you have seen Derren Brown on the TV and you thinks he’s great, you have a real interest in the subject, you thought beig bale to read peoples minds would be a good trick or you didn’t fancy any of the other subjects ion offer so you thought you’d give it a go ! What ever your reasons I’m hope that you will find it both interesting, enjoyable and thought provoking. The British Psychological Society who lay down the rules and regulations for all psychological activity in the UK define psychology as “the scientific study of people, the mind and behaviour”. Throughout the programme we will be looking at many different aspects of psychology and looking at why people behave the way that they do and what is it that make different people react in different ways in similar situations. We will be doing this is a number of different ways. Which will include looking at a number of famous research studies which have been carried out in the past and discussing their findings research. We will be looking at the strengths and weaknesses and whether the research would be allowed to be carried out today. We will get the chance to be psychologists and conduct our own psychological experiments on each other in class. The rest of this booklet includes information about what you need to bring to class my expectations. Tip on how to get on in psychology information about plagiarism – if you don’t know what it is make sure you read this section very carefully! What is covered in the syllabus and the topics we will be coving and the assessment objectives. I hope that you enjoy the study of this new topic. Miss Bowman and Mrs Hillary September 2014
  3. 3. Organisation and Expectations What you need to bring to class every lesson A4 Lever arch folder with dividers – this must contain this handbook and the laminated assessment objectives The Complete Companions: A2 Student Book for AQA A Psychology (Third Edition) (Paperback) by Mike Cardwell (Author), Cara Flanagan (Author) – please ensure you purchase the third edition. A4, wide ruled file paper Pen, pencil, pack of highlighters and ruler  There will be a lot of hand-outs during this course so you need to be organised. Make sure you file away your hand-outs regularly so that you don’t lose anything.  All the worksheets and PowerPoints used in class can be found on the Show My Homework will be updated weekly..  It is expected that you attend every lesson and that you arrive punctually and prepared. Unless specifically told by me, assume that you need to bring your textbook and folder to every lesson. You may also be asked to read an article or book chapter in preparation for a lesson. It is vitally important that this is done, as the information will be needed to complete class work, and you may be tested on the content.  If you miss any lessons, it is your responsibility to catch up – come and see us if you need some extra clarification or explanation. If you lose any of the worksheets it is your responsibility to print off new copies.  I expected that all work set is handed in on the date due. If you feel that you will be unable to complete a piece of work for a set date, come and see me to arrange an extension on the deadline. Should work not be handed in on time, and no extension has been requested, expect to spend a lunchtime or after school session catching up!. All homework will appear on Show My Homework. Absence from a lesson is not an excuse for not completing homework!  If you need any extra help understanding the topics covered in class, or guidance on homework please ask me – I am not a mind reader!
  4. 4. How to get ahead in psychology These are a few tips for enhancing your study of psychology. 1. After each lesson review the work we have covered to ensure that you fully understand it. 2. Start revising early: Don’t leave all your revision to the last minute. The most successful students are those who start their revision weeks, or even months before their exam. The best way is to revise as you go. At the end of each topic make revision notes, and look back at them regularly. 3. Practice practice practice: At the end of each topic there will be a mini mock. You will also receive exam type questions for you to complete for homework. If you do any extra work, I will be more than happy to mark it and give you feedback. 4. Read beyond the textbook: there are a few psychology textbooks and available in the library. Reading about the same content in a different book is a great way to consolidate your learning. 5. Use the internet: there are some fantastic psychology websites out there, and they often have interactive areas for you to try out your knowledge. A great website is the BPS Research Digest which has updates of recent research, and it is written in student friendly language (http://bps-research-digest.blogspot.com/). YouTube is also very useful to find psychology videos. Take a look at the Student room http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk this contains lots of useful resources, revision tips and discussion forums. Be careful however of sites like Wikipedia, always double check facts. They can often contain errors which as students you may not be aware of.
  5. 5. A note about plagiarism What is it? Plagiarism is when you copy the work of another and pass it off as your own. It is a very serious issue, and could happen in a number of ways. Work could be copied from many places, including:  The work of a friend or class mate  a textbook, magazine or other printed material  the internet  my slides and hand-outs Why is it a problem? Plagiarism is an issue for a number of reasons. Firstly, it is cheating. By passing off the work of another person as your own, you are technically committing fraud. At nearly all universities, students who are caught plagiarising will be expelled from university, and often blacklisted so that other universities may not accept them. There have been cases where many years after completing a degree, plagiarism has come to light, and ex-students have been stripped of their degrees! Therefore, it makes sense to get into the habit of not plagiarising now if you intend to go to university. Secondly, plagiarism stops you learning. By just copying the work of someone else, you are not learning. In the short term, plagiarism may help you get good grades in homework tasks, but when you are in the exam, without access to your textbook or Wikipedia, you may suddenly find yourself without a clue, and no idea of how to answer a question! Similarly, even if you manage to plagiarise and not get caught out, I will have no idea of your genuine ability and knowledge. Therefore, I will not be able to provide you with the help and guidance that you need to help you achieve. You will also waste my time by getting me to mark work which is not yours. Thirdly, you will get caught. Even if you think you are getting away with plagiarising, you will eventually get caught out. Students who are caught plagiarising will be asked to hand in every piece of work which has been set so far in the year. These will be checked, and any which are found to have been plagiarised will need to be redone..
  6. 6. How can you avoid plagiarism? By following these simple tips, you should be able to avoid plagiarism.  Do use the internet/textbooks/magazines for research. However don’t just copy/cut and paste sentences or paragraphs exactly or just change a few words. Try to paraphrase by taking the main idea of what you want to express but putting it into your own words. A god way to do this is read the article twice then rewrite the main ideas from memory. You can then go back to check if you have missed anything key.  One of the sure-fire ways that I will know if you have been copying from the internet etc. is if when questioned about an idea or term used, you are unable to show understanding. If you don’t understand something that you have read, either don’t include it in your work, or ask me to explain it.  It is a good habit to briefly note down at the bottom of any work or extra notes you make which websites/ textbooks or magazines etc. that you have used. This is useful so you know where you found the info if you want to check back during your revision or share something interesting with the rest of the class. Although the hand-outs and text books will probably be the main source of information for you during the course it is important that you learn to put things in your own words. One way to do this is to use the hand-outs to create your essay structure, but then trying to write the essay itself from memory. Can I work with a friend? Working with a friend on a homework task is a great way to enhance your learning (two minds are better than one!). However, it can often result in two students producing homework which is nearly identical. This might lead me to assume that one person has copied another person’s work. To avoid this problem carry out your research together and discuss your findings but produce the final piece of written work on your own.
  7. 7. Specification for AS Examinations to be taken Summer 2014 PSYA1 Written paper 1 hour 30 minutes Models of memory •  The multi-store model, including the concepts of encoding, capacity and duration. Strengths and limitations of the model  The working memory model, including its strengths and limitations Memory in everyday life  Eyewitness testimony (EWT). Factors affecting the accuracy of EWT, including misleading information, anxiety, age of witness  Improving accuracy of EWT, including the use of the cognitive interview  Strategies for memory improvement Developmental Psychology Early Social Development -Attachment  Explanations of attachment, including learning theory and Bowlby’s theory  Types of attachment: secure attachment, insecure-avoidant and insecure resistant  Use of the “Strange Situation” in attachment research  Cultural variations in attachment  The effects of disruption of attachment, failure to form attachment (privation) and institutional care Attachment in everyday life  The impact of different forms of day care on children’s social development including the effects on aggression and peer relations  How research into attachment and day care has influenced child care practices Research Methods Methods and techniques • Experimental method, including laboratory, field and natural experiments • Studies using a correlational analysis • Observational techniques • Self-report techniques including questionnaire and interview • Case studies
  8. 8. Investigation design Candidates should be familiar with the following features of investigation design: • Aims • Hypotheses, including directional and non-directional • Experimental design (independent groups, repeated measures and matched pairs) • Design of naturalistic observations, including the development and use of behavioural categories • Design of questionnaires and interviews • Operationalisation of variables, including independent and dependent variables • Pilot studies • Control of extraneous variables • Reliability and validity • Awareness of the British Psychological Society (BPS) Code of Ethics • Ethical issues and ways in which psychologists deal with them • Selection of participants and sampling techniques, including random, opportunity and volunteer sampling • Demand characteristics and investigator effects Data analysis and presentation Candidates should be familiar with the following features of data analysis, presentation and interpretation: • Presentation and interpretation of quantitative data including graphs, scatter grams and tables • Analysis and interpretation of quantitative data. Measures of central tendency including median, mean, mode. Measures of dispersion including ranges and standard deviation • Analysis and interpretation of correlational data. Positive and negative correlations and the interpretation of correlation coefficients • Presentation of qualitative data • Processes involved in content analysis
  9. 9. PSYA2 Written paper 1 hour 30 minutes Biological Psychology - Stress as a bodily response • The body’s response to stress, including the pituitary-adrenal system and the sympathomedullary pathway in outline • Stress-related illness and the immune system Stress in everyday life • Life changes and daily hassles as sources of stress • Workplace stress including the effects of workload and control • Personality factors, including Type A and Type B behaviour, hardiness • Psychological and biological methods of stress management, including stress inoculation therapy and drug therapy Social influence • Conformity (majority influence) and explanations of why people conform, including informational social influence and normative social influence • Types of conformity, including internalisation and compliance • Obedience to authority, including Milgram’s work and explanations of why people obey Social influence in everyday life • Explanations of independent behaviour, including locus of control, how people resist pressures to conform and resist pressures to obey authority • How social influence research helps us to understand social change; the role of minority influence in social change Individual Differences – Psychopathology (Abnormality) Defining and explaining psychological abnormality • Definitions of abnormality, including deviation from social norms, failure to function adequately and deviation from ideal mental health, and limitations of these definitions of psychological abnormality • The biological approach to psychopathology • Psychological approaches to psychopathology including the psychodynamic, behavioural and cognitive approaches Treating abnormality • Biological therapies, including drugs and ECT • Psychological therapies, including psychoanalysis, systematic de-sensitisation and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
  10. 10. Assessment Objectives In the exams, you will be tested on three different assessment objectives. These can be seen as “skills” which you develop throughout your A Level. They are the same for both AS and A2 Assessment objectives What they really mean AO1: Knowledge and understanding of science and of How Science Works Candidates should be able to: a) recognise, recall and show understanding of scientific knowledge b) select, organise and communicate relevant information in a variety of forms. Recall and describe various psychological studies. Present information in a clear and concise manner AO2: Application of knowledge and understanding of science and of How Science Works Candidates should be able to: (a) analyse and evaluate scientific knowledge and processes (b) apply scientific knowledge and processes to unfamiliar situations including those related to issues (c) assess the validity, reliability and credibility of scientific information. Identify strengths and weaknesses of psychological studies and methods used in research. Apply knowledge to unfamiliar situations AO3: How Science Works - Psychology (a) describe ethical, safe and skilful practical techniques and processes, selecting appropriate qualitative and quantitative methods (b) know how to make, record and communicate reliable and valid observations and measurements with appropriate precision and accuracy, through using primary and secondary sources (c) analyse, interpret, explain and evaluate the methodology, results and impact of their own and others’ experimental and investigative activities in a variety of ways. Understand the importance of ethics in psychology and to be able to select suitable methods of research. To be able to design, carry out and write up experiments . Assess the effectiveness of experiments and identify ways these could be improved.

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