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Miss Russell
1
Summarise what we learned
about last lesson…
What could be today’s lesson
objective? Write an example.
Thinking Ladder…

To
&
what
Social Exchange & and Equity
theory say about relationship
maintenance.
To have
these
theories...
How will I know if I am learning?
By the end of the lesson…
E

Will be able to explain what Social Exchange
Theory (SET) &...
Social Exchange Theory is an ‘economic theory’ it takes the view that social relationships are run
in a similar way to a b...
SET suggests relationships are run like a balance
sheet - partners are always trying to maximise
their rewards and limit t...
Calculate how rewarding a current
relationship (or friendship) is by assigning a
unitary value to the rewards received and...
The Comparison Level (CL)
We develop a standard which we compare all our relationships
against.
It is formed based on all ...
Current
relationship

Potential
relationship

“What
have I got
now?”

“What
could I
have?”

Profit
Profit

Comparison
leve...
Calculate and compare the outcome of a
current relationship with the expected
outcome of a previous and a potential
altern...
What do you think these mean?
Stage

Description

Mnemonic

Sampling

Bargaining

Commitment

Institutionalisation

Once y...
What do you think these mean?
Stage
Sampling

Description

Analysing the potential costs and rewards of
entering into a re...
People strive to achieve fairness in their
relationship. Inequality has the potential to cause
distress. This happens when...
Perceived ratio of Inputs and Outputs
Inequity doesn’t necessarily mean inequality. Two individuals
can put in variable am...
why might people feel dissatisfied in the
following examples?
Person is giving more to the
Person is getting more out of
r...
What do you think these mean?
Key Terms

Description

Mnemonic

Profit

Distribution

Dissatisfaction

Realignment

Once y...
What do you think these mean?
Key Terms
Profit

Distribution

Dissatisfaction

Realignment

Description

Rewards are maxim...
What kind of relationships do
Economic Theories fail to
account for…?
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  1. 1. Miss Russell 1
  2. 2. Summarise what we learned about last lesson… What could be today’s lesson objective? Write an example.
  3. 3. Thinking Ladder… To & what Social Exchange & and Equity theory say about relationship maintenance. To have these theories to real romantic relationships. To have different types of relationships that perhaps economic theories don’t explain adequately.
  4. 4. How will I know if I am learning? By the end of the lesson… E Will be able to explain what Social Exchange Theory (SET) & Equity Theory say about relationship maintenance. C Will be able to apply these theories to real relationships. A Will be able analyse what kinds of relationships are ignored by economic theories and begin to evaluate economic theories of relationship maintenance.
  5. 5. Social Exchange Theory is an ‘economic theory’ it takes the view that social relationships are run in a similar way to a business – people are haggling and negotiating in order to get the best deal. SET is based on the principles of operant conditioning which suggest we form and maintain relationships because they are rewarding – this means they are profitable because the rewards we receive from the relationship outweigh the costs incurred. This means that if the relationship stops being profitable because the costs outweigh the rewards the relationship will end.
  6. 6. SET suggests relationships are run like a balance sheet - partners are always trying to maximise their rewards and limit their costs. Satisfaction depends on the ‘outcome’ - the balance between rewards and costs - a successful relationship is a profitable one because the rewards outweigh costs, although a state of ‘loss’ will occur if the costs start to outweigh the rewards
  7. 7. Calculate how rewarding a current relationship (or friendship) is by assigning a unitary value to the rewards received and the costs incurred from Rewards received Costs incurred Value Total value rewards = Outcome: 7 Value Total value costs=
  8. 8. The Comparison Level (CL) We develop a standard which we compare all our relationships against. It is formed based on all of our experiences plus our views of what we might exchange from a particular exchange. If we judge the potential profit of a new relationship to exceed our CL, the relationship will be judged as worthwhile. If the outcome is negative (profit less than CL) we will be dissatisfied in the relationship. Similarly we have a ‘Comparison Level for Alternatives’ where we weigh up a potential increase in rewards from a potential partner, minus any costs involved in ending our current relationship.
  9. 9. Current relationship Potential relationship “What have I got now?” “What could I have?” Profit Profit Comparison level Comparison level New relationship Current relationship
  10. 10. Calculate and compare the outcome of a current relationship with the expected outcome of a previous and a potential alternative relationship. Alternative Relationship Comparison Level for Alternatives (CLalt) Costs Rewards Previous Relationship Comparision Level (CL) Outcome = Outcome =
  11. 11. What do you think these mean? Stage Description Mnemonic Sampling Bargaining Commitment Institutionalisation Once you have an idea of what they mean try and come up with a mnemonic to help you remember them. E.g. Rainbow: Richard Of York Gave Battle In Vain.
  12. 12. What do you think these mean? Stage Sampling Description Analysing the potential costs and rewards of entering into a relationship with someone. Bargaining A testing phase of giving and receiving rewards to understand whether a deeper relationship is worth forming. Commitment Sampling and bargaining is reduced and attraction to the other person will increase if the costs of being in a relationship are also reduced. Institutionalisation A relationship is recognised as having been formed and norms are developed that set the expectation of specific rewards and costs for the relationship for continued success.
  13. 13. People strive to achieve fairness in their relationship. Inequality has the potential to cause distress. This happens when one person gives a great deal and gets little in return (inequity). However the same is true of those who receive a great deal and give little in return. Equity ≠ _____ Equity = _____
  14. 14. Perceived ratio of Inputs and Outputs Inequity doesn’t necessarily mean inequality. Two individuals can put in variable amounts and still maintain equity. This is because a person holds subjective views on the relative inputs and outputs of themselves and their partner. If we fear inequity in our relationship we may try and change our input and outputs to restore equity. We may also compare it to our CL. Equity ≠ _____ Equity = _____
  15. 15. why might people feel dissatisfied in the following examples? Person is giving more to the Person is getting more out of relationship than they feel they the relationship than they feel are getting out of it… they are giving to it… 15
  16. 16. What do you think these mean? Key Terms Description Mnemonic Profit Distribution Dissatisfaction Realignment Once you have an idea of what they mean try and come up with a mnemonic to help you remember them. E.g. Rainbow: Richard Of York Gave Battle In Vain.
  17. 17. What do you think these mean? Key Terms Profit Distribution Dissatisfaction Realignment Description Rewards are maximised and costs minimised. Trade-offs and compensations are negotiated to try and gain fairness. The greater the degree of perceived unfairness, the greater the dissatisfaction. If restoring equity is possible, attempts will be made to restore it and the relationship is maintained.
  18. 18. What kind of relationships do Economic Theories fail to account for…?

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