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Resourcd File

  1. 1. SCLY1 Family Exam Questions The exam format will be EITHER 2/4/6/24/24 mark questions OR 4/4/4/24/24 mark questions Things to remember: 1) Always ensure that you DECONSTRUCT the question – make sure you know what you’re being asked to do. 2) Make your paragraphs effective – use PERC (point, evidence, reference, criticism) to keep them focused. 3) Use the words from the question in your answer eg “another reason that the death rate has fallen is……” etc – it’ll help you to keep focused on the question that you’re answering (and not the one you’d like to answer!). 4) Always make your introductions effective – use them to identify and define key terms, identify the perspective that the question is coming from or identify issues to discuss in the body of the essay. 5) Make your conclusions effective – reflect on the question and make sure you’ve answered ALL of it. 6) Don’t forget the short questions! 4 marks = 1 grade. You need to do 1 thing for 2 marks. 7) We do the family and household section – answer the correct questions! 1
  2. 2. Family 2 Mark questions Exemplar Explain what is meant by ‘divorce rate’. Jan 01 Explain what is meant by the term “‘structurally isolated’” nuclear family. June 01 Explain what is meant by ‘primary socialisation’ Jan 02 Explain what is meant by a “reconstituted” family June 02 Explain what is meant by the term ‘patriarchal’ family. Jan 03 Explain what is meant by “a functional fit’ between the nuclear family and modern industrial society” June 03 Explain what is meant by the term “urbanisation” Jan 04 Explain briefly what is meant by an “expressive” role. June 04 Explain what is meant by the “gender division of labour” in the family Jan 05 Explain what is meant by a “modified extended” family June 05 Explain what is meant by a household . June 05 A Explain what is meant by the “gender division of labour in the family” Jan 06 Explain what is meant by ‘serial monogamy’ June 06 Explain what is meant by the ‘patriarchal’ family Jan 07: Explain what is meant by segregated conjugal roles June 07: what is meant by “ascribed status” Jan 08 Explain what is meant by the ‘dual burden’ June 08 Explain what is meant by a ‘reconstituted’ family Jan 09 Explain what is meant by the symmetrical. family June 09 Explain what is meant by meant by “Domestic labour” Explain what is meant by meant by “symmetrical family” New Spec: Jan 09: What is meant by the “Expressive role” June 10 Explain what is meant by ‘serial monogamy’ (Item 2A). June 10: Explain what is meant by ‘serial monogamy’ (Item 2A). (2 marks) Jan 11: Explain what is meant by ‘net migration’ (Item 2A). 2
  3. 3. June 11 Explain what is meant by the ‘social construction’ of childhood (Item 2A). Jan 12 Explain what is meant by the ‘dual burden’ (Item 2A). June 12 Explain what is meant by the ‘matrifocal family’ (Item 2A). Family 4 mark questions Exemplar Suggest two reasons why the number of first marriages has fallen . Jan 01 Explain the difference between the infant mortality rate and the birth rate June 01 Suggest two reasons why the information from the studies in Item B might not give an accurate picture of couple relationships in Britain today. Jan 02 Identify two other forms of family diversity apart from those referred to in Item A. June 02 Explain the difference between joint conjugal roles and segregated conjugal roles Jan 03 Identify two ways in which high divorce rates might be “a major source of increased family diversity” June 03 Identify two characteristics of the “privatised” family (Item A, line 10). Jan 04 Identify two ways in which men may be “able to exploit and oppress women within the family” June 04 Suggest two ways in which differences between childhood and adulthood may be “becoming blurred” (Item A, line 11). June 05 Suggest two reasons for "differences in the proportion of lone-parent families among different social groups" (Item 1A, lines 5 - 6). Identify two criticisms made of the radical feminist view of the family (Item 1A, line 8). Identify TWO pieces of evidence in support of the view that “the nuclear family, even if in modified form, remains popular in Britain today” Suggest TWO reasons why the working class extended family might have flourished in the early industrial period in Britain. Suggest two reasons for changes in the patterns of marriage in England and Wales (Item 1A, lines 5 – 8). Suggest two reasons why lone-parent families are likely to be headed by mothers rather than fathers (Item 1A, line 9). Explain the difference between norms and values Suggest two ways in which childhood has become .a specially protected and privileged time of life. (Item 2A, lines 4 . 5). June 05 Suggest two reasons for “differences in the proportion of lone-parent families among different social groups” 3
  4. 4. June 05 A Suggest two ways in which differences between childhood and adulthood may be becoming blurred. Jan 06 Suggest two ways in which marriage and cohabitation are becoming increasingly similar June 06 Identify two criticisms made of the radical feminist view of the family Jan 07 Identify two pieces of evidence in support of the view that .the nuclear family, even if in slightly modified form, remains very popular in Britain today. (Item 1A, lines 8 . 9). June 07 Suggest 2 reasons why the working class extended family might have flourished in the early industrial period Jan 08 Suggest two reasons for changes in the patterns of marriage in England and Wales June 08 Suggest two reasons why lone-parent families are likely to be headed by mothers rather than fathers (Item 1A, line 9). Jan 09 Suggest two criticisms that other sociologists might make of the radical feminist view of the family, apart from those referred to in Item 1A. New Spec: Jan 09: Suggest TWO ways in which “family life can have a harmful effect on women” June 09 a) explain the difference between a family and a household June 09 b) suggest two reasons why lone parent families are more likely to be headed by a female June 09 c) Suggest two reasons why there has been an increase in one person households. Jan 10 a) Explain the difference between the birth rate and the fertility rate Jan 10 b) Suggest TWO reasons why women might delay having children Jan 10 c) Suggest two ways in which the position of children could have said to have improved over the last 100 years. June 10 Suggest two reasons why there has been an increase in cohabitation (Item 2A). Jan 11 Suggest two reasons why people may migrate to the United Kingdom, apart from that referred to in Item 2A. June 11 Suggest two ways, apart from those mentioned in Item 2A, in which government policies and/or laws may shape the experiences of children today. (4 marks) Jan 12 Explain the difference between the expressive role and the instrumental role (Item 2A). (4 marks) June 12 Suggest two reasons for the decline in the number of first marriages over the past 40 years or so, apart from those referred to in Item 2A. (4 marks) Family 6 mark questions Exemplar Suggest three ways in which the roles of family members have changed over the last fifty years. 4
  5. 5. Jan 01 Suggest three reasons why birth rates have fallen since the 19th century (Item A, lines 8 — 9). June 01 Identify three other functions of the family apart from the one referred to in Item A. (NOT “Primary socialisation”) Jan 02 Suggest three reasons why lone-parent families are usually headed by females June 02 Suggest three reasons why the family may have become ‘symmetrical’(Item A, line 6). Jan 03 Suggest three reasons why the rate of childbearing has fallen in the UK (Item A, lines 8 – 9). June 03 Suggest three ways in which government policies might affect family life (Item A, lines 2 – 3). Jan 04 Suggest three functions that functionalists would see the family as performing (Item A, lines 2 – 3). June 04 Suggest three ways in which childhood may not be “a specially protected and privileged time of life” (Item A, line 5). Jan 05 Suggest three reasons why women are “now having fewer children than in the past” (Item 1A, lines 8 – 9). June 05 Suggest three reasons for “social class differences in child-rearing practices” (Item 1A, lines 4 – 5). Suggest three reasons why ‘the average age at which people first marry has been rising’ (Item 1A, line 5). Suggest three functions that the nuclear family might perform Suggest three reasons for the increase in the divorce rate since 1969. June 05 A Suggest three ways in which childhood may not be a specially protected and privileged time of life. Jan 06 Suggest three reasons why lone-parent families are usually headed by women June 06 Suggest three reasons why husbands may be more likely to take the more important decisions June 07 identify three features of the symmetrical family Jan 08 Identify three changes in patterns of child-bearing and/or child-rearing since the 1970s, apart from that identified in Item 1A. June 08 Suggest three reasons why ‘the average age at which people first marry has been rising’ Jan 09 Suggest three reasons for changes in the position of children in the last hundred years or so Jan 11 Identify three ways in which greater ethnic diversity has contributed to family diversity (Item 2A). 5
  6. 6. June 11 Identify three reasons why the birth rate has fallen since 1900. (6 marks) Jan 12 Suggest three ways in which the differences between children and adults are becoming less clear in society today. (6 marks) June 12 Suggest three effects on society of an ageing population. (6 marks) 6
  7. 7. Family Essay Questions 2000- 2008 Spec Exemplar 1. Using information from Item B and elsewhere, examine the relationship between industrialisation and changes in the family. 2. Using information from Item A and elsewhere, assess the claim that the increase in the divorce rate since the Second World War has been mainly due to changes in the law. Jan 01 3. Examine the contribution of feminist sociologists to the study of family life. 4. Using material from Item B and elsewhere, assess the view that industrialisation led to the nuclear family replacing the extended family as the main form of household structure May 01 5. Examine the extent of, and reasons for, family diversity in today’s society. 6. Using material from Item B and elsewhere, assess the view that ‘the division of labour within couples has become more or less equal’ Jan 02 7. Using material from Item B and elsewhere, assess the usefulness of functionalism for an understanding of the family. 8. Examine the arguments and evidence in favour of the view that childhood is socially constructed. May 02 9. Examine the reasons for changes in the patterns of marriage, cohabitation and divorce in the last 30 years. 10. Using material from Item B and elsewhere, assess the view that despite industrialisation and urbanisation, ‘the extended family never disappeared, and … it continues to thrive today’ Jan 03 11. Examine sociological views of the ways in which laws and government policies may affect family life. 12. Using material from Item B and elsewhere, assess the view that the positions of men and women in the family have changed in recent years. May 03 13. Examine some of the reasons for the diversity of families and households in Britain today. 14. Using material from Item B and elsewhere, assess the view that it no longer makes sense to talk about the “patriarchal family” Jan 04 7
  8. 8. 15. Examine the extent of, and the reasons for, changes in the position of children since industrialisation. 16. Using material from Item B and elsewhere, assess the view that changes in the law are the main cause of increases in the divorce rate. May 04 17. Examine the effects of industrialisation on the structure of the family 18. Assess the view that, despite recent changes in family life, “the conventional nuclear family remains the norm” for families and households in Britain today. January 05 19. Examine the different functions performed by the family for individuals and for society. (20 marks) 20. Using material from Item 1B and elsewhere, assess the effect upon couples relationships of women’s involvement in paid work. (20 marks) May 05 21 Examine the ways in which social policies and laws may influence families and households. (20 marks) 22 Using material from Item 1B and elsewhere, assess the view that marriage remains a patriarchal institution. . May 06 23 Examine the reasons for changes in the position of children in the family and society. (20 marks) 24 Using material from Item 1B and elsewhere, assess sociological explanations of the increase in the number of divorces since the 1960s. (20 marks Jan 07 25 Examine the factors affecting the domestic division of labour and power relations between couples. 26 Using material from Item 1B and elsewhere, assess sociological views of the relationship between the family and industrialisation. June 07 27 Examine the reasons for the increase in family and household diversity in the last 40 years. (20 marks) 28 Using material from Item 1B and elsewhere, assess the functionalist contribution to our understanding of the family. Jan 08 29 Examine the relationship between family structure and industrialisation. 8
  9. 9. 30 Using material from Item 1B and elsewhere, assess the impact of state policies and laws on family life. June 08 31 Examine the reasons for changes in the social position of children since industrialisation. 32 Using material from Item 1B and elsewhere, assess the extent to which ‘husbands and wives now have a relationship based on equality’ (Item 1B, lines 2 – 3). Jan 09 33 examine the ways in which government policies may affect families roles and relationships 34 Using the material from item B and elsewhere, examine the view that there is a “functional fit” between the structure of the family and the type of society in which it is found. 2008 onwards spec Exemplar 35 Examine the ways in which social policies and laws may influence families and households. 36 Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the view that it no longer makes sense to talk about the .patriarchal family. (Item 2B, lines 1 . 2). Jan 09 37 Examine the ways in which childhood can be said to be socially constructed. 38 Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the view that the nuclear family is no longer the norm. June 09 39 Examine the reasons for changes in birth rates and family size since 1900. 40 Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the view that gender roles and relationships have become more equal in modern family life. June 10 41 Examine the reasons for, and the consequences of, the fall in the death rate since 1900. (24 marks) 42 Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the view that, in today’s society, the family is losing its functions. (24 marks) Jan 11 43 Examine the reasons for changes in the patterns of marriage and cohabitation in the last 40 years or so. (24 marks) 44 Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the view that the modern family has become more child-centred. (24 marks) June 11 9
  10. 10. 45 Examine the reasons for changes in the divorce rate since 1969. (24 marks) 46 Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the contribution of feminist sociologists to an understanding of family roles and relationships. (24 marks) Jan 12 47 Examine the reasons for, and the effects of, changes in family size over the past 100 years or so. (24 marks) 48 Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess sociological views of the impact of government policies and laws on family life. (24 marks) June 12 49 Examine different sociological views on changes in the experience of childhood in the past 50 years or so. (24 marks) 50 Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the view that the growth of family diversity has led to the decline of the traditional nuclear family. (24 marks) 10

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