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ResearchTalks Vol.6 - Control groups of animals with robotic lures

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ResearchTalks Vol.6 - Control groups of animals with robotic lures

  1. 1. Sempo Grégory Unit of Social Ecology, ULB gsempo@ulb.ac.be ©Philippe PLAILLY / EURELIOS Control of animal groups with robotic lures
  2. 2. Lures The use of lures is very old in the history of interactions between humans and animals.  These lures are often the result of a tradition, obtained by “trials and errors”.  Most of the time, previous studies of animal behavior (isolated or in groups) leading to formal models are lacking.  Moreover, these lures do not interact together and do not have any adaptive capability.
  3. 3. Lures At the individual level, behavioral sciences have shown that:  animal interactions could be rather “simple” signals;  it is possible to interact with animals by making specifically designed artifacts. No interaction Michelsen et al. (BES, 1992) Patricelli et al. (Nature, 2002) The artificial agent is passive (does not respond to the animal) →the loop is not closed
  4. 4. The loop is not closed FEMBOT GROUSE (G. Patricielli, behav. Ecol 2010) ROBOFISH (J. Krauze, BES 2010) Robotic squirrel (M.A. Barbour, Proc Royal Soc B 2012)
  5. 5. Lures At the individual level, behavioral sciences have shown that:  animal interactions could be rather “simple” signals;  it is possible to interact with animals by making specifically designed artifacts. Vaughan (SAB, 1998) No interaction Interaction Not a « congener » Michelsen et al. (BES, 1992) Patricelli et al. (Nature, 2002) Ishii, Robotica 2013 Review: Knight, J. Nature (2005).
  6. 6. Cyborgs ROBOT ROACH (Bozkurt, IEEE 2012) ROBOT BEETLE (Maharbiz, DARPA) REMOTE CONTROLLED RAT (S. Talwar, Nature 2002)
  7. 7. Mixed societies (natural and artificial agents)  develop mixed-societies composed of social animals and artificial agents (robots) that interact and share collective decision. Case study: shelter selection by cockroaches and robots
  8. 8. Implementation : external view 2 Photodiodes ⇒ Shelter detection Linear Camera ⇒ Cockroach detection 12 IR Proximity Sensors ⇒ Cockroach detection ⇒ Wall detection ⇒ Robot detection
  9. 9. Tracking tool: analysis of individual behaviour Swistrack software RFID (Correll N. et al., 2006) Project leader: D. Fresneau
  10. 10. Collective choices in mixed societies + + + + ? +
  11. 11. Experimental demonstration (different shelters) 12 cockroaches & 4 robots Collective selection of the light shelter Light Dark (Halloy et al. 2007, Science)
  12. 12. Summary  Existence of shared and controlled collective choice between machines and animals  Implementation of active chemical communication between robots & animals  Both machines insects are able, independently of each other, to perform such collective decision.
  13. 13. Partners •Unit of Social Ecology (USE) •International Solvay Institutes for Physics and Chemistry •Autonomous Systems Laboratory (ASL1) •Ethologie-Evolution-Ecologie (EVE) •Swarm-intelligent Systems Group (SWIS) •Laboratoire d'Ethologie Expérimentale et Comparée (LEEC) •FNRS

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