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AVID Gamification by Renee Merritt

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AVID Gamification by Renee Merritt

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Game Based Learning (GBL) is used in AVID for college and career readiness strategies. Here are some games to try for high school students learning about finance, profit, project management, and community service. This is target to 9th - 12th grade students or AVID 1, 2, 3, & 4.

Game Based Learning (GBL) is used in AVID for college and career readiness strategies. Here are some games to try for high school students learning about finance, profit, project management, and community service. This is target to 9th - 12th grade students or AVID 1, 2, 3, & 4.

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AVID Gamification by Renee Merritt

  1. 1. AVID Gamification Skill Builder EdTech Lesson Dimension 2.2 Differentiation Strategies DL5103 Instructional Models for Digital Learners Created by Renee Merritt, American College of Education Dr. Barbara Yalof, Ed.D, Professor
  2. 2. Skill Builder EdTech Lesson Dimension 2.2 Differentiation Using UDL Strategies Game Based Learning Advantages ● Fun engagement ● Motivation to continue playing ● Critical thinking ● Stress reliever ● Social emotional skill building
  3. 3. Skill Builder EdTech Lesson Dimension 2.2 Differentiation Using UDL Strategies Game Based Learning Disadvantages ● Waste of time, distraction ● Poor design, no thinking skills involved ● Confusion to objective, learning gaps ● Player addition, captured ● Disconnect to standards (August 2016)
  4. 4. Skill Builder EdTech Lesson Dimension 2.2 Differentiation Using UDL Strategies Gamification Alternatives: Universal Design for Learners Key Takeaways ● text, audio and hands-on formats ● offer different types of testing like oral presentations, group projects, or sketchnotes for measuring knowledge. ● Various means to keep students motivated. (Morin 2019)
  5. 5. Gamification: Lesson Planning
  6. 6. Skill Builder EdTech Lesson Dimension 2.2 Differentiation Using UDL Strategies Brain Network/ UDL Recognition: the “WHAT” of learning – provides students with multiple ways of collecting and learning information.
  7. 7. Skill Builder EdTech Lesson Dimension 2.2 Differentiation Using UDL Strategies Brain Network/UDL Strategic: the “HOW” of learning – provide students with multiple ways to demonstrate their understanding.
  8. 8. Skill Builder EdTech Lesson Dimension 2.2 Differentiation Using UDL Strategies Brain Network/UDL Affective: – the “WHY” of learning – provide students with multiple ways for engagement.
  9. 9. 3rd World Farmer Scholars learn strategies to produce profitable farm crops and control cost, famine, disease, and health factors affecting plants, livestock and the family. Rated for High school: Difficulty rating 4 out of 5
  10. 10. Oilagarchy Scholars learn strategies to invest in oil production while managing factors that cause inflation and recession affecting the cost of doing business in a political community. Rated for High school: Difficulty rating 1 out of 5
  11. 11. The Forest Temple III Scholars learn collaboration and coordination skills to level up. As the avatars move through game segments, they learn methods to prevent death from skillful maneuvers. Rated for High school: Difficulty rating 3 out of 5
  12. 12. Now Boarding! Scholars learn strategies to produce profitable farm crops and control cost, famine, disease, and health factors affecting plants, livestock and the family. Rated for High school: Difficulty rating 5 out of 5
  13. 13. Conclusion UDL and GBL work together to increase teaching and learning benefits and the retention of skills learned are from students who enjoy activities when information and objectives are incorporated into gamification.
  14. 14. References August. S. (2016). Pros & cons of game-based learning. Sara’s Blog. Retrieved from: https://saraaugust.wordpress.com/2016/05/08/pros-cons-of-game-based-learning/ Duckworth, S. (2019). Google Image. Retrieved from https://sylviaduckworthblog.files.wordpress.com/2018/05/untitled_artwork.jpg. (2018). Retrieved January 27, 2020, from App.goo.gl website: https://images.app.goo.gl/nLFWe4KhNJA8GZMp6 Computer impact of different kinds of games. (2019) Google Image. Retrieved from: https://res.cloudinary.com/www-virgin-com/w_1200,c_scale,dpr_3.0,f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/virgin- com-prod/sites/virgin.com/files/styles/article_search_result/public/gettyimages-860050538.jpg?itok=JovBG5oQ. (2020). Retrieved January 27, 2020, from App.goo.gl website: https://images.app.goo.gl/4B2J6WnNMEiYzE9c6 High school work with hands. (2019). Google Image. Retrieved from https://www.eastbaytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/20150126__linklearn1.jpg?w=620. (2016). Retrieved January 27, 2020, from App.goo.gl website: https://images.app.goo.gl/FdJBVCKwVPMsYRpe6 Morin, A. (2019). Universal design for learning (UDL): What you need to know. Educational strategies. Understood. Retrieved from: https://www.understood.org/en/learning-thinking- differences/treatments-approaches/educational-strategies/universal-design-for-learning-what-it-is-and-how-it-works Video game boost knowledge. (2019) Google Image. Retrieved from: https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/08/05/18/1E0BADCE00000578-3725720-image-m-90_1470416421279.jpg. (2016). Retrieved January 27, 2020, from App.goo.gl website: https://images.app.goo.gl/fd8JLm8TDC8ez1Rk9

Editor's Notes

  • Games may cause learners to engage in their classroom more while creating an environment of learning with experience.
    Games are fun and can motivate and/or encourage the learner to continue playing.
    The interaction involved in games can help learners understand better.
    Games may improve critical thinking skills as well as reading comprehension.
    Games can be a source of stress relief for some people.
  • Games may be a source of distraction and waste of time.
    If games aren’t designed correctly, it could be a disadvantage to the learner’s thinking.
    If teachers aren’t familiar with technology (aren’t tech-savvy) the way students are, there could be a gap between teaching and learning.
    Games could lead to student addiction, thus causing physical/psychological problems.
    Games do not necessarily always align with the learning goals of the classroom.
  • With UDL, information is often presented in more than one way, including text, audio and hands-on formats.
    UDL encourages teachers to offer different test formats, including oral presentations and group projects, to get a more accurate picture of what students know.
    UDL also looks for different ways to keep students motivated.
  • Teacher explains what the lesson will be with a possible ESL language barriers. EdTech support could be small group instruction using video or non tech choice to draw students explanation of game farming outcomes.
  • Teacher explains how the lesson will be learned during the activity with a possible ESL language barriers. EdTech support could be text to speech and non-tech choice could be peer explain in home language or to break the information into chunks about farming strategies.
  • Teacher uses motivational strategies for the why in the lesson for ESL or 504 students learning challenges. EdTech support could be text to speech and non-tech choice could be English language learning strategies to define and copy vocabulary.

  • 3rd World Farmer
    This game brings to life a real problem of drought that plagues some areas of Africa. AVID has a large population of immigrants from this continent. Being placed in a myriad of scenarios to manage crops and to sustain personal health gives students the ability to work out situations on a platform that allows critical thinking through trial and error. The 3rd World Farmer game gives them some power back to determine whether or not there are actions that could have been taken to produce a better life or some to learn to venture back to the home country as a service to their countrymen. It puts any students into a mindset to understand circumstantial situations that affect the quality of life like famine, disease, or weather that maybe an issue to survival. The game starts the player with a family, money, and a farm with choices how to manage resources. Over a period of each calendar year, those choices affect the prosperity or devastation of the outcome from those choices. 5 out of 4 star. The script has some spelling errors.
  • Oilagarchy
    This game starts off with the nostalgic soundtrack from the 1960’s western show Rawhide for fun and uses current 2018 terms from The Apprentice like “You’re fired!” if not enough drilling for oil is produced for profits to be paid to its shareholders. Oilagarchy is a money management simulation game that delves into the political world of greed, deceit, and exploitation that are negative traits in business with ecological activism to counteract destructive behaviors. AVID students are taught moral values and traits of good citizenship. This game positions students to have post thoughts after setting up choices that show the ramifications that occur from those choices. The downside of the game is there are no modifications to be made, so you cannot show political restorative actions. Watching how the scenario unfolds prepares students for a Socratic Seminar that deals with ethics and business decisions. What traits would a corporate citizen carry to maintain integrity in commerce and still achieve the corporate profit goals? How environmentalist affect decisions. The uneasy part of this game is its introduction explains its political decisions are based upon imperialism methodologies, propaganda and kickbacks. This position brings great discussion about what is important to corporate survival and humanity in a changing technological presence in a global economy, the measure of wealth, and unyielding power.
  • The Forest Temple III
    Collaboration is the key skill to the Forest Temple III game. Two students must work with arrows and letters on a keyboard to evolve to each level or achievement as characters Fire Boy & Water Girl. It is not complicated to master the skills. The challenge is in collaboration. This is a Die-and-Try game where you do not live very long and must use trial and error to gain enough experience to harness the techniques to live through each experience. When players collaborate in these situations, it can become tense when a player is classified as a Newbie or Noob. If the player is learning, they are considered a Newbie. If the player who is known but makes a lot of mistakes could be referred to as a Noob Boob or just a Noob in some circles. AVID elective teachers engage students with physical collaborative activities that foster bonding. The program often refers to AVID family members. This game requires collaborative communication, coordination, and strategy. Because one can lose the game for the other player, it is important to work together.
  • Now Boarding! Build your own Airline
    Part of the Career & College Readiness STEM and Military programs (CCRSM) that AVID students have access to are Career and Technical Education (CTE) that includes Educational Technology (EdTech). Now Boarding! Is a very complicated game simulation where managerial skills of organization, quality decision making, managing human capital and customers are critical in the success of skills using qualitative and quantitative thinking. Students get applicable experience preparing them to meet certification requirements upon graduation if they pass the examination. This game is unforgiving and a player can easily get #rekt or embarrassed by so many errors or defeated from crashes of an airline. This tense game puts the oneness with the student to understand the importance of the right decisions and skills to keep everyone safe with managed routes and weather. Airport management is not for everyone, but this experience gives students a glimpse of reality using EdTech.
  • UDL and GBL work together to increase teaching and learning benefits and the retention of skills learned are from students who enjoy activities when information and objectives are incorporated into gamification.
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