Enterprise computing

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Enterprise computing

  1. 1. Enterprise Computing
  2. 2. Enterprise Computing an organization created for business ventures
  3. 3. Enterprise Computing the use of computers to process data or perform calculations.
  4. 4. Enterprise Computing computer technology applied on business-oriented organizations
  5. 6. Use of Computers in the Business Industry
  6. 7. Use of Computers in the Business Industry <ul><li>Accounting </li></ul>
  7. 8. Use of Computers in the Business Industry <ul><li>Accounting </li></ul><ul><li>Customer Interaction </li></ul>
  8. 9. Use of Computers in the Business Industry <ul><li>Accounting </li></ul><ul><li>Customer Interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul>
  9. 10. Use of Computers in the Business Industry <ul><li>Accounting </li></ul><ul><li>Customer Interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Websites and Advertising </li></ul>
  10. 11. Enterprise Information System
  11. 12. Enterprise Information System Integrated Enterprise Enterprise information systems integrate various information within an enterprise
  12. 13. Major Types of Enterprise Information Systems <ul><li>Executive Support Systems (ESS) </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Support Systems (DSS) </li></ul><ul><li>Management Information Systems (MIS) </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) </li></ul><ul><li>Office Automation Systems (OAS) </li></ul><ul><li>Transaction Processing Systems (TPS) </li></ul>
  13. 14. Executive Support Systems An Executive Support System (&quot;ESS&quot;) is designed to help senior management make strategic decisions. It gathers, analyses and summarises the key internal and external information used in the business.
  14. 15. Decision Support Systems Decision-support systems (&quot;DSS&quot;) are specifically designed to help management make decisions in situations where there is uncertainty about the possible outcomes of those decisions. DSS comprise tools and techniques to help gather relevant information and analyse the options and alternatives. DSS often involves use of complex spreadsheet and databases to create &quot;what-if&quot; models.
  15. 16. Knowledge Management Systems Knowledge Management Systems (&quot;KMS&quot;) exist to help businesses create and share knowledge information. These are typically used in a business where employees create new knowledge and expertise - which can then be shared by other people in the organisation to create further commercial opportunities. Good examples include firms of lawyers, accountants and management consultants.
  16. 17. Office Automation Systems Office Automation Systems (“OAS”) are systems that try to improve the productivity of employees who need to process data and information. Perhaps the best example is the wide range of software systems that exist to improve the productivity of employees working in an office (e.g. Microsoft Office XP) or systems that allow employees to work from home or whilst on the move.
  17. 18. Transaction Processing Systems As the name implies, Transaction Processing Systems (&quot;TPS&quot;) are designed to process routine transactions efficiently and accurately.
  18. 19. Management Information Systems A management information system (&quot;MIS&quot;) is mainly concerned with internal sources of information. MIS usually take data from the transaction processing systems and summarise it into a series of management reports.
  19. 20. Benefits of EIS Firm structure and organization
  20. 21. Benefits of EIS Firm structure and organization Management made easy
  21. 22. Benefits of EIS Firm structure and organization Management made easy Unified platform
  22. 23. Disadvantages of EIS Difficult to build: Require fundamental changes in the way the business operates
  23. 24. Disadvantages of EIS Difficult to build: Require fundamental changes in the way the business operates Expensive Technology: Require complex pieces of software and large investments of time, money, and expertise
  24. 25. Disadvantages of EIS Difficult to build: Require fundamental changes in the way the business operates Expensive Technology: Require complex pieces of software and large investments of time, money, and expertise Centralized organizational coordination: Not the best way for firms to operate
  25. 26. Questions?
  26. 27. Sources <ul><li>http://www.thefreedictionary.com/enterprise </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.dictionary.reference.com/browse/computin </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.peterindia.net/EnterpriseComputOverview.html </li></ul><ul><li>www.ccse.kfupm.edu.sa/~atique/SE464...systems/lab01_introduction.ppt </li></ul><ul><li>http://tutor2u.net/business/ict/intro_information_system_types.htm </li></ul>

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