Organic Research at the University of Misssouri in 2012

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An overview of Organic grain production research at hte University of Missouri.

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  • Mention here: By making an effort to reduce your farm’s contribution to climate change, you will be, at the same time, preparing your farm to resist the effects of climate change
  • Organic Research at the University of Misssouri in 2012

    1. 1. ORGANIC GRAIN CROPRESEARCH AT THEUNIVERSITY OF MISSOURIResearchers: Tim Reinbott, Robert Kremer, Newell Kitchen, Debi Kelly, RayMassey, Kerry Clark, Amanda Wolfgeher, Dara Boardman, Steven Easterby
    2. 2. COVER CROP BEFORE HARVEST
    3. 3. PLOWING UNDER COVER CROPS
    4. 4. THE EVILS OF TILLING Loss of Organic Matter  Soil structure  Soil microbial biomass Release of CO2 Soil Erosion Why Till?  Weed Control
    5. 5. TILLED IN A CORN/SOYBEAN/WHEATLONG TERM NO-TILL ROTATIONTILLED VS NO-TILL-WE HAVE LOST NEARLY 1 FTOF TOP SOIL
    6. 6. SOIL EROSION-EVEN WITH NO-TILLAGE
    7. 7. SANDY LOAM SOIL
    8. 8. TYPICAL SOIL PUDDELING AFTER A RAIN OF ANERODED SOIL-LOSS OF SOIL STRUCTURE
    9. 9. HOW DO YOU MAINTAIN OR IMPROVE SOILQUALITY?
    10. 10. A THICK MULCH TO NO-TILL INTO
    11. 11. MORE TO COVER CROPS THAN JUST NITROGEN
    12. 12. From Steve Groff No Cover CropCover Crop
    13. 13. COVER CROPS REDUCE WATER RUNOFF ORINCREASE WATER INFILTRATION
    14. 14. SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES FOLLOWING 3YEARS OF COVER CROPS Treatment Water-Aggregate Stability Pentrometer Bulk  % Increase over control % increase Mg/m3 Corn/Soybean 1.32 Corn/rye/soybean/rye 9 19 1.24 Corn/rye/soybean/hairy vetch 13 8 1.23 Corn/rye/soybean/Hv+rye 17 16 1.23 From Villamil, et al 2006
    15. 15. CAN COVER CROPS AND NO-TILLDECREASE GREENHOUSE GASES?
    16. 16. The Culprits: Greenhouse Gases United StatesGreenhouse Gas Emissions, 2010 Carbon Dioxide (C02) is the most prevalent greenhouse gas. But other gases have a greater potential to warm the climate. • Methane (CH4): 20 x more effective at warming the atmosphere than CO2. Image created by EPA • Nitrous oxide (N2O): 300 x more effective.
    17. 17. CO2 LEVELS OVER TIME
    18. 18. CO2 EMISSIONS AND CARBON STORAGE Agriculture 25% of CO2 Sources  Tillage, N Production, Cover Crops Decrease CO2 Release from Increased C Storage However, With Tillage Much of the Benefit is Lost Cover Crops with Tillage Less C Storage than No-Tillage without Cover Crops
    19. 19. GREENHOUSE GASES IN AGRICULTUREU.S. Nitrous Oxide Emissions Agriculture is the main source of nitrous oxide in the U.S., due in large part to nitrogen-based fertilizers, but residue breakdown also contributes Image created by EPA
    20. 20. NITROUS OXIDE-N20 CONTRIBUTED BYAGRICULTURE Anerobic Conditions  wet Nitrogen Fertilization  1.5% of all N is lost as N20 Animal Manures/Compost N from Cover Crops?
    21. 21. THIS IS WHAT HAPPENEDIN 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
    22. 22. WHAT ARE WE DOING?
    23. 23.  Bradford Research Center, 5 miles east of Columbia, MO (Boone County) Organic Farmer Cooperators:  David Gray, Montgomery County, MO  Warren Wilson, Audrain County, MO  Terry Littrell, Audrain County, MO  James Maberry, Livingston County, MO
    24. 24.  USDA-NIFA OREI  Grant Greenhouse gas emissions from organic production using tillage with and without cover crop and no-till with cover crop  How to plant corn into a cover crop (timing and way of destroying cover crop)  Summer cover crops to follow wheat CERES TRUST Grant  Transition strategies for going from conventional to organic grain crop production  Organic Vegetable Production and Soil Health
    25. 25. CORN/SOYBEAN/WHEAT ROTATION
    26. 26. Treatments of the study are: 4 Compost rates in subplots, based on crop P needs Plots are: No-till with cover crop, Tilled with cover crop, Tilled without cover crop Photos taken June 22, 2012, DOP May 21
    27. 27. COMPOST APPLICATON BASED UPON P Compost:3-2-2 Wheat P Recommendation-80 lb P205/acre Corn P Recommendation- 120 lb P205/acre Soybean P Recomendaton-90 lb P205/acre Wheat P Treatments: 0, 40, 80, and 120 lb P205/acre Wheat Compost Application Rates:  0, 1333, 2666, and 4000 lb Compost/acre
    28. 28. 2012 Wheat Yield 60 50Bushels/acre 40 30 20 10 0 0 lbs/acre 2105 lbs/acre 4210 lbs/acre 6315 lbs/acre Compost Rate 2105 lbs compost contains 40 lbs P and 59 lbs N 4210 lbs compost contains 80 lbs P and 117 lbs N 6315 lbs compost contains 120 lbs P and 176
    29. 29. COVER CROP YIELD 6704 lb/acre 6989 lb/acre
    30. 30. ROLLING/CRIMPING THE COVER CROP
    31. 31. Soil moisture in cover crop and no cover crop plantson May 16, 2012 (one day before corn planted, 15days after last rain) Treatment Depth (inches) Soil Moisture (%) Rye cover crop 0 to 2 17 2 to 6 19 6 to 10 19 No cover crop 0 to 2 12 2 to 6 16 6 to 10 25 Field capacity is approximately 34% and the wilting point is approximately 18 % soil moisture. Conclusion- cover crops conserved moisture in seed zone but depleted deeper soil moisture.
    32. 32. ORGANIC PRODUCTION-COLLECTING CO2 ANDN2O SAMPLES
    33. 33. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION BY COVER CROPS IN CORN DAR= days after rain (irrigation)
    34. 34. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION BY COVER CROPS INSOYBEAN DAR= days after rain (irrigation)
    35. 35. SOYBEANS ON JULY 16… All look about the sameTill, no cover crop Till, with cover crop No-till, with cover crop Weed control 1 cultivation in tilled soybeans and corn, 2 minor hoeings in all plots. Weeds are being held back well by This alley area has had no cover crop and drought. weed control other than rolled cover crop
    36. 36. CORN NOT THE SAME STORYJUNE 22, 2012No-till with cover Tilled, no Tilled, withcrop cover crop cover crop
    37. 37. JULY 16, 2012 Tilled, no cover crop Tilled, with cover crop
    38. 38. 2012 Soybean Yield 50 45 40 35Bushels/acre 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 no-till tilled + cc tilled no cc Tillage Type
    39. 39. 2012 Soybean Yield 43.0 42.0 41.0 40.0Bushels/acre 39.0 38.0 37.0 36.0 35.0 34.0 33.0 0 lbs P/ac 45 lbs P/ac 90 lbs P/ac 135 lbs P/ac Compost Rate
    40. 40. 2012 Corn Yield 80.0 70.0 60.0 50.0Bushels/acre 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 0.0 no-till tilled + cc tilled no cc Tillage Type
    41. 41. 2012 Corn Yield 90 80 70Bushels/acre 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 0 lbs N/ac 90 lbs N/ac 180 lbs N/ac 270 lbs N/ac Compost rate
    42. 42. MEASURE SOIL QUALITY-ACTIVE CARBON
    43. 43. PLANTING CORN INTO A COVER CROP(RYE+HAIRY VETCH) IN A NO-TILL FIELD How should cover crop be destroyed? Rolling or Chopping When should corn be planted? Before or after cover crop destruction Planted into standing cover crop Destroyed and planted same day Planted 1 week after destruction Planted 2 weeks after destruction
    44. 44. DESICCATION OF THE COVER CROPROLLER CRIMPER
    45. 45. FLAIL MOWING
    46. 46. PLANTING INTO A STANDING CROP
    47. 47. DAY OF DESICCATION 5 DAYS LATER Flailed Rolled Rolled FlailedTO ROLL OR FLAIL CHOP
    48. 48. PLANT PERPENDICULAR TO THE WAY IT SEED TO SOIL CONTACT CAN BE AWAS ROLLED CHALLENGEWHAT IF THE COVER CROP IS STILL ALIVE?
    49. 49. Corn germination when planted into rye cover crop 100 90 80Plant count per 10 feet 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 chop roll chop roll chop roll chop roll before cc destroyed same day cc 1 week after cc 2 weeks after cc destroyed destroyed destroyed
    50. 50. SUMMER COVER CROPS TO FOLLOW WHEAT Why let your field build up its weed bank like these plots with no cover crop planted?
    51. 51. Get weed reduction and improved soil organicmatter with summer cover crops likebuckwheat and sorghum-sudangrass. Theseplots had no herbicide and are all no-till
    52. 52. Follow wheat with a legume summer cover crop, such ascowpea, which will fix nitrogen. If followed up with awinter cover crop, that nitrogen will continue to beavailable for your crop the following summer. Cowpea Weedy plot with no cover crop
    53. 53. Sorghum sudangrass is very effective at controllingweeds and contains chemicals that can persist in the soiland continue to control weeds in the following season.Best to follow with soybeans. Sorghum Weedy plot with sudangrass no cover crop
    54. 54. Sunn hemp and sesbania are two other nitrogen fixing summercover crops. Seed costs are a little higher than for othersummer cover crops. If government programs continue toencourage cover crop usage, the market for cover crop seed willincrease and prices may lower. Local production of cover cropseed should also be considered. Sunn hemp sesbania
    55. 55. Summer Cover Crop Yields 25000 20000Pounds/acre of dry matter produced 15000 10000 5000 0 Crop Species
    56. 56. Percentage of weed cover100%90%80%70%60%50%40%30%20%10% 0% buckwheat cowpeas fallow sesbania ss sunn hemp turnip winter radish
    57. 57. CERES FOUNDATION Transitioning to Organic Weed Control number one problem Soil Quality Build up Strategies
    58. 58. STRATEGIES FOR TRANSITIONING Cash Crop All Three Years? Weed Control Strategies Tillage vs No-Tillage
    59. 59. TREATMENTS Always use a polyculture cover crop- legumes, grasses, and brassicas Treatment 1: always use a crop that is mowed or incorporated into the soil-no cash crop-includes sorghum x sudangrass (SXS)
    60. 60. TREATMENTS Treatment 2-cover  Treatments 5 and 6- crops first year (SXS): same as treatments 3 cash crops 2nd (grain and 4 except tilled sorghum) and 3rd years.  Treatment 7: tilled sorghum x sudan first Treatments 3 and 4: year followed by no-till-soybean/grain wheat/soybean/corn sorghum or soybean/corn rotation
    61. 61. WHY SORGHUM? Allelopathic  Chemicals released from roots that inhibit weed germination No GMO’s  Sorghum Bicolor is also shattercane!
    62. 62. 2012 Ceres Trust Study Weed Soybean Stand dry Crop dry grain Crop count/10 matter matter yieldTransitional system 2012 crop Height (in) feet (lbs/acre) (lbs/acre) (bu/acre)No-till w/ summer sorghum-cover crop sudangrass 65 78 2591 4879Conventional till soybean 34 51 1662 2589 44.7No-till soybean 20 40 1849 684 5.9
    63. 63. ORGANIC VEGETABLE PRODUCTION
    64. 64. ORGANIC VEGETABLE PRODUCTION-SOILHEALTH
    65. 65. QUESTIONS?

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