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Beyond Milkshakes - Using JTBD for Innovation & Product Design

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We’ve all seen the Clayton Christensen drive-through milkshakes video, heard the Snickers story and possibly brought the mattress; but many years on, JTBD (jobs to be done) still means different things to different people. At Redgate, JTBD is now a key part of our design toolkit. It gives us a top-down, solution-agnostic understanding of users’ needs; along with an understanding of the situation and context in which those needs manifest. We’ll talk about how JTBD helps us to discover new opportunities for innovation and to connect design decisions back to the jobs our products seek to address.

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Beyond Milkshakes - Using JTBD for Innovation & Product Design

  1. 1. Beyond Milkshakes: Using JTBD for Innovation & Product Design
  2. 2. Who are we? Natalia Rey - Product Designer Matt Godfrey - Head of Product Design
  3. 3. What we’re not going to talk about...
  4. 4. A little bit of background...
  5. 5. “Customers don’t want your product or what it does; they want help making their lives better.” Alan Klement
  6. 6. What is a Job?
  7. 7. What is a Job? What I’m buying: A better nights sleep so I can focus & be more productive. What I’m sold: A ‘Gro Clock’...then a sleep tracker...then? Customer: Matt, a busy dad of two with kids on a different body clock! + = Where I am now Where I want to be Situations
  8. 8. Key Principles of JTBD 1. Outcome focused What customers want to achieve vs. the tasks or activities they currently do. 2. Solution agnostic Rooted in better analysis of the full problem-space vs. solution-space. 3. Stable over time Whilst situations, technology and expectations change, jobs are stable. 4. Functional, social & emotional A single job comprises of functional, social and emotional components.
  9. 9. Key Influencers Anthony Ulwick - Outcome Driven Innovation Alan Klement: The Job Story Bob Moesta et al: The Switch Interview Clayton Christensen: Theory of Progress Jobs-as-Progress Jobs-as-Activities
  10. 10. Why did we hire JTBD? Reasons for switching
  11. 11. Why we hired: The Pushes Connect research with strategy Limited understanding of customers and their goals compromised our ability to identify and articulate new, potentially more valuable opportunities.
  12. 12. Why we hired: The Pushes Point tool vs. Solution mindset Mindset of designing for point tools, when customers are actually looking for solutions that might enable them to accomplish their bigger goals.
  13. 13. Why we hired: The Pulls Get to the primary ‘why?’ JTBD promises a way to understand what customers are really trying to achieve. The underlying motivation and struggle that caused them to buy (hire) our products.
  14. 14. Why we hired: The Pulls Higher order of analysis JTBD provides a top-down, outcome- centric approach to design and innovation. The job (rather than your product) is the unit of analysis.
  15. 15. Why we hired: Habits Teams work largely in silos JTBD required us to think outside of what we’d normally consider to be a teams’ problem space. Would have to change the way we work as designers.
  16. 16. Why we hired: Habits Focus on evaluative methods Traditionally we’ve focused on evaluative research methods, but we’d have to change our approach to discover and analyse customers’ jobs.
  17. 17. Why we hired: Anxieties Right level of abstraction? Struggled to find right level of abstraction - What jobs can or should we reasonably design for that still aligned with our business goals?
  18. 18. Why we hired: Anxieties Finding emotion is hard Functional, more utilitarian jobs are easier to identify. Harder to extract emotional and social motivations, particularly with business products.
  19. 19. “A lense through which to understand value creation.” Jim Kalbach
  20. 20. Case Study/Example Provisioning
  21. 21. Context Databases - boxes where data lives When shopping with your credit card, details of your card, your account and the transaction will be stored in a database and passed to your bank for processing.
  22. 22. Companies Production databases Companies have to be very careful with their use of data, restricting who can access these production databases. New regulations around it.
  23. 23. Target audience Personas and JTBD. This is John, our database administrator. He is the guard of production, and thanks to him, no data can be missed, shared or saved in non-secure locations. He is like a librarian, and he has to mind his books.
  24. 24. Updates in databases Engineers need to make changes to their systems frequently and these databases need to be updated. A very important part of his role is to provide copies of production database to developers so then they can work on those copies - without touching production.
  25. 25. John has some Jobs-to-be-Done
  26. 26. Redgate We are a technology company that innovates in providing SQL Server solutions for IT teams. Here’s SQL Provision, a solution that serves most of John’s jobs. We are going to talk about this solution that designers at Redgate have been working on.
  27. 27. Hiring Jobs-to-be-Done To provide a better understanding of John and his functional jobs: Monitoring, provisioning and troubleshooting. Emotional: Loves tech and he is constantly looking for better solutions. Social: He needs to be seen as someone reliable, who can always save the day.
  28. 28. How well does SQL Provision serve John’s jobs?
  29. 29. John’s Journey
  30. 30. Job story “When copies fail John wants to be able to know what happened - why they failed, when they failed - so he can fix the problem and create the copy again faster - as he knows what happened he won’t make the same errors again”
  31. 31. Job story “When copies fail John wants to be able to know what happened - why they failed, when they failed - so he can fix the problem and create the copy again faster - as he knows what happened he won’t make the same errors again” PROBLEM FRAMED NOT SOLUTIONS AT THIS POINT SITUATIONN MOTIVATIONN EXPECTED OUTCOMEN PERSONAN
  32. 32. How we might solve it? John’s problem becomes our problem too - it’s our business goal. IDEAS BRAINSTORMED TOGETHER - DECIDE - MATCH BACK TO THE JOB STORY
  33. 33. The experiment WE EXPECT PEOPLE USE THE ACTIVITY FEED TO IDENTIFY WHAT HAPPENED WHEN SOMETHING FAILS. 1. PEOPLE SPEND A CONSIDERABLE AMOUNT OF TIME USING THE ACTIVITY FEED. 2. PEOPLE GIVE A POSITIVE RESPONSE WHEN SURVEYED ASKING “DID IT HELP YOU TO UNDERSTAND WHAT HAPPENED? WE WILL KNOW IF WE SUCCEED IF
  34. 34. When copies fail I want to be able to know what happened - why they failed, when they failed - so I can fix the problem and create the copy again faster - as I know what happened I won’t make the same errors again.
  35. 35. John has some Jobs to-be-done REDGATE HELPS JOHN TO BECOME A BETTER DBA: FUNCTIONALLY, EMOTIONALLY AND SOCIALLY
  36. 36. What have we changed?
  37. 37. John’s JTBD John’s AS-IS scenario Job Story (problem framed) Ideation Experiment TO-BE experience 1 2 3 4 5 6
  38. 38. Summary
  39. 39. Key Takeaways 1. JTBD is a great framework for understanding causality & motivation 2. Focus on outcomes (personal or professional) vs. products and features 3. Learn by doing. Practice and apply JTBD to your own business context 4. Principles & mindset are more important than the tools! 5. Start small. Think about your last purchase...what was the real JTBD?
  40. 40. Recommended Reading
  41. 41. We’re hiring Product Designers! Find out more: Redgate Design @MatthewGodfrey @mikitcha @uxredgate

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