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BDI Disability Awareness Training 2015

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Disability awareness training presentation.

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BDI Disability Awareness Training 2015

  1. 1. WHY IS DISABILITY AWARENESS TRAINING NEEDED? • 19% of Americans have a disability, making it our country’s largest minority . • It is a minority that ANYONE can join. • Less than 15% of people with disabilities were born with them. • 40% of employed people with disabilities still report experiencing some form of job discrimination. • Approximately 65% of people with disabilities who want to work can’t find a job. • People with disabilities are three times more likely than people without disabilities to live below the poverty line . 2 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  2. 2. WHY IS DISABILITY AWARENESS TRAINING NEEDED? Disability awareness training helps us: • Our society is moving towards full inclusion of people with disabilities in education, social circles and the workplace. • Understand that disability is just one aspect of a person’s full and complex life. • See each person as an individual, not as a disability. • Recognize that every individual – with or without a disability – faces challenges. • Individuals with disabilities face some unique challenges related to their disabilities which can be accommodated. S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G 3
  3. 3. WHY IS DISABILITY AWARENESS TRAINING NEEDED? Disability awareness training helps us: • Help people with disabilities achieve their highest potential and independence. • Communicate and relate to people with disabilities. • Develop knowledge of disability-related resources. • Expand our circle of friends to include people with disabilities. 4 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  4. 4. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) The ADA prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, State and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation, and telecommunications. It also applies to the United States Congress. To be protected by the ADA, one must have a disability or have a relationship or association with an individual with a disability. 5 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  5. 5. MYTHS, MISCONCEPTIONS AND REALITIES True or False: Cancer, diabetes, AIDS, epilepsy, dyslexia and mental illness are examples of “hidden” disabilities which are covered by the Americans With Disabilities Act. TRUE. However, things like sexual behavior disorders, illegal drug use and compulsive gambling are not covered. True or False: If you’re assisting a person who uses a service dog, petting the dog is okay. FALSE. For safety reasons, a dog needs to be alert and undistracted while working. Avoid treating the dog like you would a pet. 6 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  6. 6. MYTHS, MISCONCEPTIONS AND REALITIES True or False: It’s appropriate to sit down when you’re speaking to someone in a wheelchair. TRUE. Try to sit down in order to share the same eye level. If seating is not available, give the person some space. Standing too close while you talk can create an uncomfortable viewing angle. True or False: If someone has a disability and appears to need help, it is polite to provide assistance before you’ve been asked. FALSE. Simply ask the person to let you know if they require assistance. 7 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  7. 7. MYTHS, MISCONCEPTIONS AND REALITIES True of False. More than 65% of all people who have cerebral palsy (CP) have a mental disability. FALSE. This is a common misconception. There is a wide range of abilities among people who have cerebral palsy, and most do not have a mental disability. True or False. If a person is having a seizure, it is appropriate to put something in his/her mouth to prevent him/her from swallowing his/her tongue. FALSE. If you do that, there is a risk that the person will choke on whatever you put in his/her mouth. 8 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  8. 8. MYTHS, MISCONCEPTIONS AND REALITIES True or False. Considerable expense is required to accommodate employees with disabilities. FALSE. An analysis of more than 10,000 disabled employees showed that: • 31% required no added cost for special training or facilities. • 50% had special training and facilities costs under $50. • 69% had special training and facilities costs under $500. • Only 1% had special training and facilities costs over $5,000. • Studies show that building a new facility that is accessible adds only 0.5% to the building's cost. 9 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  9. 9. IMPORTANT POINTS TO REMEMBER The key to creating an accepting work environment is to treat each individual with respect and equality!  Do not be overly friendly or condescending toward individuals with disabilities.  Use appropriate greetings, such as shaking hands.  Challenge derogatory language or jokes.  Take responsibility for making people feel welcome and accepted.  Get to know people with disabilities. 10S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  10. 10. IMPORTANT POINTS TO REMEMBER When providing assistance: • First, ask if help is needed. • Be sure you understand what is needed. • Don’t take over; just help. Speak directly to the person rather than through someone else, such as a sign language interpreter. 11S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  11. 11. IMPORTANT POINTS TO REMEMBER • Don’t be afraid of making a mistake. • Use common sense and a positive attitude. • Always think of the person first. • Be generous with yourself. Unsure of what to do or say? Ask! Made a mistake? Apologize, correct, learn and move on. 12S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  12. 12. IMPORTANT POINTS TO REMEMBER: WORD CHOICE  Avoid words with negative connotations like: “handicapped,” “afflicted,” “crippled,” “victim,” “sufferer,” etc.  Do not refer to individuals by their disability. A person is not a condition.  Emphasize “person first” terminology : Handicapped A PERSON with a disability. Deaf A PERSON who is deaf. Mute A PERSON without speech. Confined/Wheelchair-Bound A PERSON who uses a wheelchair. • If you happen to not have a disability at this time in your life, that DOES NOT make you “normal” or “able-bodied.” It just makes you … non-disabled. 13S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  13. 13. IMPORTANT POINTS TO REMEMBER: PEOPLE WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS  The definition of legally blind is 20/200 vision with best correction.  However, many people who are considered blind do have some sight.  Introduce yourself and explain what your job role is.  Speak in a normal tone of voice. There is no need to shout.  When you move around, let the person who is blind know so that he/she won’t be talking to “empty air.” 14 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  14. 14. IMPORTANT POINTS TO REMEMBER: PEOPLE WITH HEARING LOSS • American Sign Language (ASL) is not another form of English. It is an official language with its own grammar, context and rules. • Lip-reading is only 30 – 50% effective and can be tiring during long conversations. • Get the attention of the deaf person before starting a conversation. • Be patient if you are asked to repeat yourself. • If needed, use a paper and pencil to communicate. • If the person uses a sign language interpreter, address the person, not the interpreter 15 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G
  15. 15. IMPORTANT POINTS TO REMEMBER: PEOPLE WHO USE WHEELCHAIRS  There is a wide range of physical ability among people who use wheelchairs, and people who use them will likely require different degrees of assistance.  Make sure the person is ready before you start pushing the wheelchair.  Sometimes people are told a place is accessible when it is not.  Consider distance, weather, and obstacles such as stairs, curbs, or hills when you give directions. 16 S O U R C E S : N I S H D I S A B I L I T Y E T I Q U E T T E A N D T H E I D E A B A N K S O U R C E A M E R I C A “ T H E S K Y I S T H E L I M I T ” D I S A B I L I T Y A W A R E N E S S T R A I N I N G

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