Measuring employee volunteering
and assessing its impact
Reana Rossouw
Next Generation Consultants
The challenge:
HOW DO WE MEASURE AND
PROVE THE VALUE (IMPACT
AND RETURN) OF EPV?
Current practice:
• Quantitative data mostly:
• Number of employees
• Number of beneficiaries
• Value of activity & contri...
Solution:
Impact Investment Index
• Developed over four years
• Assessed the impact and return of R1 billion investment, 4...
The process:
Shared Value Impact and Return
Community
Impact
Business
Return
Stakeholders
Learners
Teachers
Parents
Interm...
Qualitative: Impact on communities
•Increased of awareness of organisation and Increased opportunity for marketing and pub...
Qualitative: Return for Business
Business Return -
Collective - Qualitative
Changed perceptions, enhanced
reputation and a...
Quantitative – Community impact and Business
Return
•Number of beneficiaries - by type - by geographic location
•Value of ...
Thank You
• Reana Rossouw
• Next Generation Consultants - Specialists in Development
• E-mail: rrossouw@nextgeneration.co....
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Beyond Painting Classrooms - Employee Volunteerism - Reana Rossouw

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What's the value of Employee Volunteerism: What is the impact and what is the ROI? How does one measure the value?

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Beyond Painting Classrooms - Employee Volunteerism - Reana Rossouw

  1. 1. Measuring employee volunteering and assessing its impact Reana Rossouw Next Generation Consultants
  2. 2. The challenge: HOW DO WE MEASURE AND PROVE THE VALUE (IMPACT AND RETURN) OF EPV?
  3. 3. Current practice: • Quantitative data mostly: • Number of employees • Number of beneficiaries • Value of activity & contribution • Value of time/hours or products and services • Challenge is how to measure past quantitative inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes to consider qualitative impact and return
  4. 4. Solution: Impact Investment Index • Developed over four years • Assessed the impact and return of R1 billion investment, 400 programs over 15 dimensions of impact and 20 dimensions of return, and in the process built a library of more than 500 indicators for more than 10 focus areas • The secret? • Identify all stakeholders – impacted / benefitted by the program • Identify all impact – per stakeholder group – qualitative and quantitative • Count the impact (on the stakeholders and return for the donor) • Record data and analyse the data • The result and outcome? • Able to Define - quantify and qualify the difference a donor and its partners (volunteers) has made
  5. 5. The process: Shared Value Impact and Return Community Impact Business Return Stakeholders Learners Teachers Parents Intermediaries Partners - other donors Government - local, national, provincial Impact and Return Qualitative Impact • Increased health and productivity • Decline in infant mortality • Increased access to health care • Increased access to government services Quantitative Impact • Number of learners, teachers • Passrates • Jobs - full time, learnerships • Bursaries • University Access Return • Increased profit, customers, br and awareness • Mitigate operational risk and protect licence to operate • Increased stakeholder relations and access to government tenders Dimensions • Economic, environmental, social • Short, medium, long term • Direct, indirect, postive, negative, intended, unintended
  6. 6. Qualitative: Impact on communities •Increased of awareness of organisation and Increased opportunity for marketing and public relations •Increased opportunity to recruit volunteers and Increased access to funds and resources •Leverage of existing funds and resources and Assess to new partnerships and donors •Increasing efficiency: helping a non-profit to use fewer resources – such as man hours or materials – in performing its operations or delivering its services •Increasing effectiveness: helping a non-profit increase the success rate of the services it provides (e.g., for a non-profit fighting homelessness, the percentage of homeless people served that ended up sustainably housed) •Increasing reach: helping a non-profit to serve more beneficiaries Intermediaries •Access to products and services •Increased quality of life •Increased sense of community •Increased opportunity for skills and jobs •Decreased dependence on government Direct Beneficiaries •Contribution to social cohesion, nation building, empowerment •Promotes civil engagement and communication •Contributes to safer communities, stronger communities, and neighbourhoods •Increases knowledge and awareness of social issues •Create a community of volunteers – increased awareness of social issues •Increases number of volunteers •Strengthening of social fabric of society •Support, extent and leverage government services and resources •Encourages citizens to become more active and proactive •Delivering public goods and services Indirect Beneficiaries Civil Society, Governme nt, other donors, partners, v olunteers
  7. 7. Qualitative: Return for Business Business Return - Collective - Qualitative Changed perceptions, enhanced reputation and awareness Increased sale of products / services Increased goodwill and customer loyalty Builds relationship capital and enhance stakeholder relations Opportunity to gain access to markets and aid market / company performance Business Return - Specific - Qualitative Human Resources •Improved morale & recruitment & retention •Skills development •Increased productivity Sales & Marketing •Opportunity to enter new markets •Opportunity to sell products / services & branding CSI •Leverage existing resources & create opportunity for internal support, buy-in, awareness •Increased capacity Operations •Opportunity for enhanced stakeholder relations •Opportunity to manage licence to operate conditions & opportunity to manage operational risk Business Return Individuals - Qualitative Skills gained – personal skills, leadership skills, project skills, interpersonal skills Changed behaviour – including Undertake more volunteering, Talk positively of company, do job better, understanding of and empathy with colleagues, awareness of wider social issues Impact on job – including: Job satisfaction, pride in company, commitment to company, understanding of issues, empathy with customers/communities – other people
  8. 8. Quantitative – Community impact and Business Return •Number of beneficiaries - by type - by geographic location •Value of savings •Value of services •Value of products •Income generated •Employment value generated •Value of skills acquired Community •Value of contribution •Number of volunteers •Number of hours •Value / cost of hours •Value of services i.e. training - Value of skills •Rand Rate of Social Return on Investment (SROI) •Value of cost savings •Value of publicity generated Business •Value of services provided by volunteers •Number of EVP Partner Organisations - by type of organisation •Number of volunteers - by Demographic categories •Number of volunteer activities by type (i.e. education, health and human services, civics, arts and culture, and environment) •Number of Volunteer Hours - by volunteer type, by volunteer activity type, volunteer frequency, average by volunteer type •EVP Participation Rates - proportion of total number of employees, proportion of all types of volunteers •Company-Paid Service utilization Rates CSI
  9. 9. Thank You • Reana Rossouw • Next Generation Consultants - Specialists in Development • E-mail: rrossouw@nextgeneration.co.za • Web: www.nextgeneration.co.za

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