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Human Resources in Fragile and Conflict-Affected settings - cross sectoral issues between health and education

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Human Resources in Fragile and Conflict-Affected settings - cross sectoral issues between health and education

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Overview presentation by Tim Martineau for seminar on human resources in health and education in fragile and conflict affected settings, organised by HEART in June 2016.

Overview presentation by Tim Martineau for seminar on human resources in health and education in fragile and conflict affected settings, organised by HEART in June 2016.

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Human Resources in Fragile and Conflict-Affected settings - cross sectoral issues between health and education

  1. 1. Cross-sectoral issues between Health and Education in Human Resources in fragile and conflict-affected states HEART seminar on Human Resources in Fragile and Conflict-affected States Royal Society, London 9th June 2016
  2. 2. Introductions  Name  Organisation  Role/specialism HEART 2 NAME INSTITUTION Alvaro Alonso-Garbayo ReBUILD team at LSTM Chris Berry DFID Chris Joynes EDT Elisabeth Resch OPM Helen Mobey EDT Jo Keatinge DFID Katharine Holmes EDT Lizzie Smith DFID Nick Hooton ReBUILD team at LSTM Nicola Watt DFID Nigel Pearson Independent Consultant Patrick Douglas EDT Peter-Sam Hill OPM Rashid Zaman OPM Sam Franzen OPM Sophie Witter ReBUILD team at QMU Susy Ndaruhutse EDT Tim Martineau ReBUILD team at LSTM Willy McCourt Independent Consultant
  3. 3. HEART Consortium Members www.heart-resources.org 3
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. Programme  Introduction, Tim Martineau (Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) and Joanna Buckley (OPM) HEART 5
  6. 6. Recruitment to retention ‘pipeline’ Adapted from: Vujicic et al, 2006 • Initial posting • Induction • Bonding • Career choice • Science grades • Capacity • Need (quality & quantity) • Registration • On payroll • ROI Selection • criteria • process
  7. 7. Recruitment to retention ‘pipeline’ Adapted from: Vujicic et al, 2006 • Shortage of health workers in Africa in 2013 = 4.2M • Shortage of 18M health workers to meet SDGs • 100M children no 1o Education • 18 countries with Lower 2o pupil : teacher ratio >30:1
  8. 8. Comparing HR in health and educations sectors in MLICs Similarities  largest public sector workforce  difficult to staff in remotest areas  traditionally high proportion of females  historically high engagement of FBOs  increasing privatisation of professional training and service delivery  both sectors have dedicated HR targets in their respective SDGs  ?powerful unions  ?use of performance-based incentives Differences  complexity of cadres in health vs simpler structure in education  high level of international migration of health professionals vs lower for education sector  less predictable workloads in health (Hanson 2015)  ?greater use of task-shifting in health HEART 8
  9. 9. Few examples of work across health and education
  10. 10. Context of fragile and conflict-affected states  Since 2010, all major donors have published frameworks for programming in FCAS development projects need to be sensitive to how interventions shape the broader state-building and conflict dynamics within which they operate.  DFID increased spending in FCAS to 30% of UK ODA by 2014-15, representing an 86% increase since 2010. In November 2015 HMG made a commitment to allocate 50% of all DFID’S spending to fragile states and regions.  This commitment, combined with the reduction in number of DFID priority countries from 43 to 28 following the 2011 Bilateral Aid Review, and commitment to spend 0.7% GNI on ODA have led to a significant absolute increase in DFID’s expenditure on FCAS.  Range of scenarios of FCAS: – Humanitarian assistance (less in education) – Reconstruction phase – Development phase – Transition from one to another
  11. 11. Challenges of working in fragile and conflict-affected states  Being conflict sensitive – who you engage with, how and where. Adverse impacts of certain health interventions e.g. Taliban's offensive against the polio vaccinations in Pakistan.  Access – e.g attacks on hospitals in Syria and Afghanistan.  Lack of strong institutions – gaps in regulatory, legislative and policy framework e.g. Somalia.  Questions of equity of access  Limited infrastructure e.g. roads, electricity, water
  12. 12. Objective of the session  explore the potential for cross-sectoral learning, and attempt to draw out some initial lessons about challenges and effective strategies that could further strengthen human resources in the fields of education and health in complex contexts and redress the current sectoral silos
  13. 13. Programme  Introduction, Tim Martineau (Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) and Joanna Buckley (OPM)  The health perspective, Sophie Witter (Queen Margaret University)  The education perspective, Chris Joynes (Education Development Trust)  Tea and coffee break  Lessons learnt (Chris Berry and Lizzie Smith, DFID)  Floor discussion  Wrap-up and conclusions HEART 13
  14. 14. Floor discussion in HR in health and education in FCAS  What are the most important common challenges?  What are the differences?  Where could there be greater collaboration between the two sectors? (programme design, research, etc)  What specific help do donors and governments want?
  15. 15. Thank you

Editor's Notes



  • Shortage of health workers in Africa in 2013 = 4.2M (GHWA strategy)
    Conversely, there will be a projected shortage of 18 million health workers to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, mostly in low- and lower-middle income countries. Source: High-Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth
    http://www.who.int/hrh/com-heeg/com-heeg-meeting-chair/en/

  • Since 2010, all major donors have published frameworks for programming in FCAS. This is in response to research that emphasises the feedback loops between inclusive political settlements, core state capacity, and legitimacy in forming a social contract that is the basis of sustainable development.
     
    Donors reason that development projects need to be sensitive to how interventions shape the broader statebuilding and conflict dynamics within which they operate.
     
    DFID increased spending in FCAS to 30% of UK ODA by 2014-15, representing an 86% increase since 2010. In November 2015 HMG made a commitement to allocate 50% of all DFID’S spending to fragile states and regions.
     
    This commitment, combined with the reduction in number of DFID priority countries from 43 to 28 following the 2011 Bilateral Aid Review, and commitment to spend 0.7% GNI on ODA have led to a significant absolute increase in DFID’s expenditure on FCAS .
     
    Range of scenarios of FCAS
    Hummanitarian assistance eg. for IDPs
    Reconstruction phase
    Development phase
    Transition from one to another
     Add something about staff in gaps in eduction and health
  • Since 2010, all major donors have published frameworks for programming in FCAS. This is in response to research that emphasises the feedback loops between inclusive political settlements, core state capacity, and legitimacy in forming a social contract that is the basis of sustainable development.
     
    Donors reason that development projects need to be sensitive to how interventions shape the broader statebuilding and conflict dynamics within which they operate.
     
    DFID increased spending in FCAS to 30% of UK ODA by 2014-15, representing an 86% increase since 2010. In November 2015 HMG made a commitement to allocate 50% of all DFID’S spending to fragile states and regions.
     
    This commitment, combined with the reduction in number of DFID priority countries from 43 to 28 following the 2011 Bilateral Aid Review, and commitment to spend 0.7% GNI on ODA have led to a significant absolute increase in DFID’s expenditure on FCAS .
     
    Range of scenarios of FCAS
    Hummanitarian assistance eg. for IDPs
    Reconstruction phase
    Development phase
    Transition from one to another
     Add something about staff in gaps in eduction and health

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