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IT In The Park 2017

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Service Managers strive to continually deliver better services but the day to day job can mean that they don't have the opportunity to keep up with the latest developments in technology and best practice thinking. Customer journey management, Smart advisors and chatbots, Team collaboration, Robotic Process Automation, Artificial intelligence, Multichannel digital experiences, Pervasive Technologies, Resource Scheduling, Swarming, BRM, DevOps, VeriSM, ITOM, SIAM ... What will give them an advantage?

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IT In The Park 2017

  1. 1. How does ITIL embrace Cloud and DevOPs adoption? Chris Rydings CTO Axios Systems Plc
  2. 2. DevOps
  3. 3. DevOps & ITIL
  4. 4. (1) Service Request (2) Change Request (6) Change Service Request Tracked DevOps & ITIL
  5. 5. DevOps & ITIL
  6. 6. DevOps & ITIL
  7. 7. “Cloud”
  8. 8. “Cloud” Changes for ‘cloud’ Isolated activities Focus on delivery Teams in silos Close collaboration Monolithic designs Lightweight components
  9. 9. Modular Agile Teams
  10. 10. So where do we begin?
  11. 11. So where do we begin?
  12. 12. So where do we begin? Change Impact? LMH Change: Item Affected? Change: Business Area Affected? We adapt and change!
  13. 13. Change: Update Build Docs Change: Item Affected? Change: Business Area Affected? Change: Impact Assessment
  14. 14. ITIL does embrace Cloud and DevOPs adoption
  15. 15. Chris Rydings CTO Axios Systems Plc
  16. 16. THE ART OF WAR CUSTOMER SERVICE SUN TZU SIMON SHERIDAN PRODUCT MANAGER AT CITIZENS ADVICE
  17. 17. 1.LAYING OF PLANS 2. WAGING WAR 3. ATTACK BY STRATAGEM 4. TACTICAL DISPOSITIONS 5. USE OF ENERGY 6. WEAK POINTS AND STRONG POINTS 7. MANEUVERING AN ARMY 8. VARIATIONS OF TACTICS 9. THE ARMY ON THE MARCH 10. CLASSIFICATION OF TERRAIN 11. THE NINE SITUATION 12. ATTACKING BY FIRE 13. THE USE OF SPIES
  18. 18. 1.LAYING OF PLANS 3. ATTACK BY STRATAGEM 4. TACTICAL DISPOSITIONS 5. USE OF ENERGY 6. WEAK POINTS AND STRONG POINTS 7. MANEUVERING AN ARMY 8. VARIATIONS OF TACTICS 13. THE USE OF SPIES
  19. 19. LAYING OF PLANS
  20. 20. Knowing your Customer If you do not know your customer and do not know yourself, you will lose in every engagement. If you do not know your customers but know yourself, you win one and lose one If you know your customers and know yourself, you will not be at risk in a hundred engagements
  21. 21. Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.
  22. 22. SYSTEM WHO ARE YOUR CUSTOMERS? CUSTOMER (CLIENT) CUSTOMER (EMPLOYEE)
  23. 23. SYSTEM COMPLEXITY WHO ARE YOUR CUSTOMERS? SIMPLICITY SIMPLICITY
  24. 24. SYSTEM WHO ARE YOUR CUSTOMERS? COMPLEXITY COMPLEXITY
  25. 25. EXAMPLE
  26. 26. CUSTOMER (CLIENT)
  27. 27. CUSTOMER (AGENT)
  28. 28. THE RULES OF ENGAGEMENT
  29. 29. Team ETeam DTeam CTeam BTeam A Person A Person A Person A Person A Person A
  30. 30. CAREFULLY STUDY THE WELL- BEING OF YOUR STAFF, AND DO NOT OVERTAX THEM. CONCENTRATE YOUR ENERGY AND HOARD YOUR STRENGTH. Sun Tzu
  31. 31. 73%Of people are happiest when they can help themselves
  32. 32. THE GREATEST VICTORY IS THAT WHICH REQUIRED NO BATTLE SUN TZU
  33. 33. KNOWLEDGE
  34. 34. CUSTOMER (CLIENT) CUSTOMER (AGENT)
  35. 35. A LEADER LEADS BY EXAMPLE. NOT BY FORCE SUN TZU
  36. 36. APRIL 2016 - THE CHALLENGE REPLACE AN EXISTING TEAM WITH 40 YEARS COMBINED KNOWLEDGE AND 8 STAFF. WITH 4 STAFF WITH 0 DAYS KNOWLEDGE. IN 60 DAYS.
  37. 37. THIS MONTH’S STATS
  38. 38. DO YOU THINK YOU COULD SHOW US THAT AGAIN?
  39. 39. APRIL 2017 - THE CHALLENGE MOVE TEN NON IT TEAMS ON TO FRESHDESK TICKETING
  40. 40. RESOLUTIONS AVERAGES PRE APRIL 2017 336 HOURS POST APRIL 31h 16m HOURS
  41. 41. 90.7% IMPROVEMENT
  42. 42. THE USE OF SPIES - SUN TZU CUSTOMER FEEDBACK - SIMON SHERIDAN
  43. 43. FURTHER READING
  44. 44. QUESTIONS
  45. 45. Collaboration and why it should matter to you Gerry Sweeney – CEO & Founder, Hornbill November 28th 2017
  46. 46. ▪ Introduction ▪ What is Collaboration ▪ Why is Collaboration Important to IT ▪ Collaboration in your Organisation What I would like to cover in this talk
  47. 47. Gerry Sweeney • Founded Hornbill in 1995 • Seen well over 800 Service Management deployments, many from cradle to grave. • Devised and Executed our Collaboration Platform and Collaborative ITSM strategies started in 2011 Twitter: @gerrysweeney @hornbill
  48. 48. What is Collaboration?
  49. 49. Actually lets start with what Collaboration is NOT….
  50. 50. Collaboration is NOT a tool like Slack, Yammer, Office365 Teams or Hornbill
  51. 51. …and, Collaboration is NOT using consumer social media tools like Facebook in the workplace
  52. 52. collaboration kəlabəˈreɪʃn/ noun: collaboration working together on an activity, project or goal.
  53. 53. Collaboration is a “Culture” A collaborative culture is based on openness, complete transparency and building trust. It focuses its energy on the search for solutions to challenges and leveraging opportunities rather than on placing blame or searching for “guilty.” FORBS 2014: 6 Concrete Steps To Building A Collaborative Culture That Inspires
  54. 54. Effective Communication Enabling Conversations Tacit Knowledge Sharing Learning & Self-Development Team & Relationship Building (trust) Employee Engagement & Awareness Organisational Culture Building
  55. 55. Non- collaborative Collaborative InternallyCompetitive ExternallyCompetitive Conflicted Organisational Behavior Characteristics Internally Focused Innovative Strong Leadership Visionary Silo’s Productive Destructive Excessive Meetings Trust Shared Goals Sharing Protective Risk Averse Agile
  56. 56. Modern Collaboration tools in a business context are generally fashioned around simple, intuitive and easy to use “consumer-like” experiences.
  57. 57. Why is Collaboration Important to IT?
  58. 58. The Changing IT Landscape • Consumer Experiences
  59. 59. • Retired and in her 70’s • Has never used a desktop computer – ever! • Is in constant contact with three children and eleven grandchildren • Uses apps for news, photos, facebook & snapchat, paying bills and watching content. Changing World
  60. 60. The Changing IT Landscape • Best Practice vs. Agile • Old vs. New • Conflicted Industry • Large investment in ITIL
  61. 61. SIAM
  62. 62. Collaboration does not directly solve these problems And Collaboration is not an alternative to any framework or best practice either, but…
  63. 63. Collaboration will help you with these things Remember, Collaboration is not yet another framework for you to grapple with, you do not need to “buy it”, its a simple change in culture and the business benefits from getting this right are immense.
  64. 64. Effective Communications Keeps people “in the know” and out of meetings…
  65. 65. Enabling Conversations Conversations and outcomes are never lost in email inboxes or by the coffee machine
  66. 66. Tacit Knowledge Sharing Capture and build knowledge while “getting work done” without any extra time, effort or processed.
  67. 67. Learning & Self- Development Your people are engaged, they self-develop and learn as they go.
  68. 68. Employee Engagement Your people communicate and share what they know because that’s what they are used to doing in their personal lives – is a natural behaviour given the right environment and tools.
  69. 69. Relationships & Building Trust Collaborative teams build strong working relationships and “trust” which fosters innovation and ”get the job done” mind sets.
  70. 70. Team & Organisational Culture Collaborative teams create outstanding team and organisational culture through openness, transparency and trust.
  71. 71. How Can I Adopt Collaboration for IT?
  72. 72. Think Big but Start Small • Culture does not change over night – be patient • Respect your teams fears, uncertainties and doubts. • Pick a small “collaborative” team and internal influencers and start there. • WARNING: If you just roll out “a tool” and hope you will become collaborative as a result you will almost certainly fail.
  73. 73. Start With Leadership • If you do not have strong leadership buy-in forget trying to change your culture. • If you manage a team and have the authority to change your teams culture, in other words if you are a leader in your own right within your organisation, then you can lead the change just for your team. • The important point is, you have to be committed to a culture of collaboration because it takes work to make the transition.
  74. 74. You Do Need a Tool • Contrary to general advice around best practice like ITIL where you start with people and process then choose a tool – to succeed with Collaboration you need tools pretty much from the off. • There are many tools to choose from but choose wisely because this is where you will build your body of knowledge.
  75. 75. What to look for in a Tool • You need something integrated with the tools your teams use day-in-day-out. • If you roll-out a stand-alone tool your team will see it as “just another thing they have to do” • The act of “just doing your work” in the tools you use should ensure you are building knowledge. • You must move *ALL* internal conversations off of email and into your collaboration tool of choice – this is a non- negotiable, because people are so used to e-mail they will revert without realising it. (This is where your leadership is truly tested.)
  76. 76. Here are Some Tool Capability Examples…
  77. 77. Organise Conversations into Topics
  78. 78. Share Knowledge with your Co-Workers
  79. 79. Engage your team – its not all about work!
  80. 80. Improved CAB Meetings Collaboration has revolutionised our CAB. We used to spend hours talking through every change, our last CAB meeting was done in eleven minutes flat. Change is more agile, and our team are able to get on with other more productive work. Greg Fellows, ICT Service Support Manager
  81. 81. Free Flowing Information Collaboration is particularly exciting, it enables information and communication to flow freely between teams in different offices and countries. Collaboration will change the way we work, and take Global IT Services to the next level. Nard Van Breemen, Global IT Manager
  82. 82. If you do transition to a collaborative way of working I can guarantee it will never go out of date, it will always be relevant and you and your team will never want to go back to the old way of working.
  83. 83. Thank You
  84. 84. Employee Experience is about money, not only feeling warm and fuzzy.
  85. 85. Agenda • Why use Employee Experience? • Making a Business Case • Case examples – effect of Ticket Bounce – in Projects vs. Continuously – in Digital Transformation – for ServiceDesk Motivation – from Feedback to Business Case • Q&A
  86. 86. 20 years of experience around digital services and working with large global enterprises. pasi.nikkanen@happysignals.com @pasinikkanen Pasi Nikkanen Chief Product Officer “Passion in creating employee experience as the service management driver.”
  87. 87. We provide Independent Benchmark http://happysignals.com/benchmark - 135.000 responses past 6 months 93 Countries 300.000 Employees >200 Organisations
  88. 88. Employees are Neutral Employees’ don’t have an agenda, they just try to do their work without a hassle and frustration. When you have enough volume, it’s not a voice of an individual employee anymore. All parties can agree on customers’ opinion. Oh, and they are your customers!
  89. 89. IT’s normal focus is in things where you don’t need to face the end-user. MTTR FCR % # ESC UPTIME SLA PROCESSES PIR# INC MONITOR
  90. 90. When actually what matters is how end-user feels about the service. HAPPINESS? FRUSTRATION? PRODUCTIVITY ? BUSINESS VALUE?
  91. 91. “Measure how employees feel. If you measure time- based service level, providers will use all tricks to make sure they stay below SLAs.” Vesa Erolainen, CIO of the Year 2016 in Finland
  92. 92. Employee Experience is… +60 3h 6min Based on 135.000 responses. Go to http://happysignals.com/benchmark Happiness Lost Worktime …Value for Business
  93. 93. 10 points in Happiness means 30 min of lost productivity. Does Happiness correlate to productivity? 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 290 +30 +35 +40 +45 +50 +55 +60 +65 +70 +75 Happiness to Lost Worktime Correlation 2h 10min 4h 45min min
  94. 94. If we save only 15min / ticket How much does bad experience cost? 10.000 employees 40.000 tickets annually £50 / hour internal employee price Current cost of lost productivity £6.000.000 HappyBenchmark (122.000 IT Incident, 6 months) 3 hours / ticket Saved productivity £500.000€
  95. 95. CASE EXAMPLES OF USING EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE
  96. 96. Effect of ticket bounce From 12.000 Feedbacks. £50 internal hourly price used in calculations. £ 87 + £ 23 + £ 78 + £ 30 + £ 106
  97. 97. DO NOT MEASURE JUST IN PROJECTS. MEASURE EXPERIENCE ALL THE TIME. Consistent metrics, better cost efficiency and shows unexpected changes as well.
  98. 98. Customer example: Portal rollout Success +10? +30? +20? +50? Trend is positive.
  99. 99. Change of Outsourced Service Provider Continuous neutral measurement is priceless. New provider would have their metrics, that they have optimized for their services. Now they are compared directly to old provider and all feeling based discussions can be ignored and focus on facts and how to improve. Old provider. New provider. Rollout in phases.
  100. 100. Change of Outsourced Service Provider After few weeks, they are on their way back up!
  101. 101. EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE AS MOTIVATION FOR SERVICE DESKS
  102. 102. A Service Provider - Last 6 months “We go through the individual negative feedbacks and show them in SD team weekly meetings.” Focus on individual cases.
  103. 103. 75% of the feedback is positive, learn instantly.
  104. 104. ”RESEARCH INDICATES THAT PEOPLE EXPERIENCING POSITIVE EMOTIONS PERCEIVE MORE OPTIONS WHEN SOLVING PROBLEMS AND GENERALLY PERFORM BETTER OVERALL.” Dr. David Rock, NeuroLeadership Institute
  105. 105. 3.000 tickets annually From feedback to business calculation. We could see the case was about “Account locked”, which was metadata from customer’s ServiceNow. Does this happen often?? 4h 21min per ticket £50 / h internal employee price 3 h Target: Saved via automation. £450.000 Saved first year.
  106. 106. How can we show the value of internal services to our business units? NEW DEMANDS
  107. 107. Q&A Download presentation and access resources from http://happysignals.com/it500
  108. 108. DIGITAL TRANSFOR- MATION.
  109. 109. World’s largest taxi company, Owns no vehicles. World’s most popular media owner, Creates no content. World’s most valuable retailer, Has no inventory. World’s largest accommodation provider, Own no real estate. DIGITAL TRANSFOR- MATION IN BUSINESS.
  110. 110. DIGITAL TRANSFOR- MATION IN BUSINESS. Technological savviness UX design Agile structure Entrepreneurial spirit Collaborative processes Business acumen Graphic: Deloitte University Press | DUPress.com
  111. 111. MYRIAD OF BEST PRACTICES AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES...
  112. 112. “IT IS NOT THE STRONGEST OF THE SPECIES THAT SURVIVES, NOR THE MOST INTELLIGENT, BUT THE ONE MOST RESPONSIVE TO CHANGE” CHARLES DARWIN. POSSIBLY.
  113. 113. IS ITSM BEST PRACTICE ENOUGH FOR THE FUTURE? WE ASKED. Only 24% of respondents think that existing ITSM best practice has kept up with the changing IT and business landscapes. *2 * 2 Source: EXIN BCS SIAM® Survey from February 2017 with 3783 responses world-wide
  114. 114. RESPECT THE PAST EMBRACE THE FUTURE. VeriSM™ acknowledges the value of what has gone before, and provides you with an up-to-date approach to Service Management to make sure you are ready for the Digital Age.
  115. 115. A TAILORED APPROACH.
  116. 116. VERISM™ KEY CONCEPTS. We know that an organization has to use all of its capabilities to deliver value through products and services. IT, HR, sales, marketing, etc. are all part of the organizational capabilities.
  117. 117. VERISM™ KEY CONCEPTS. CONSUMER REQUIREMENTS DEFINE PRODUCE PROVIDE RESPOND MANAGEMENT MESH CONSUMER (Verify, Review, Improve) SERVICE MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES GOVERNANCE
  118. 118. THE WORD COMES FROM LATIN: VERUS (TRUE). Verism is the artistic preference of contemporary everyday subject matter instead of the heroic or legendary in art and literature; it is a form of realism. Source: Wikipedia
  119. 119. ORGANIZATIONS CAN BECOME INVOLVED BY: - Becoming a partner of the IFDC - Influencing the future development of VeriSM™ to ensure the approach optimally supports the generation of business value - Adopting VeriSM™ and / or developing services based on VeriSM™ PROFESSIONALS CAN BECOME INVOLVED BY: TRAINING EDUCATION PROVIDERS CAN BECOME INVOLVED BY: - Getting trained & certified (updating your skills) - Contributing to the development of VeriSM™ as a subject matter expert - Joining the VeriSM™ community - Becoming an accredited training organization for VeriSM™ - Becoming an academic partner of the IFDC
  120. 120. Brian Crighton
  121. 121. ➢ Head of ServiceNow & Service Improvement at RBS ➢ 28 years experience in IT Service Delivery ➢ Presented at ITSMF UK & Service Desk Institute ➢ Don’t have any belts in Six Sigma but have a black belt in Kyokushin Karate
  122. 122. ➢ How This Presentation Came About ➢ The Kanku Model ➢4 key behaviors ➢5 key attributes ➢ Summary ➢ Questions
  123. 123. Common Perception ➢ Exist to stop people getting in ➢ Looking for a fight ➢ Singular approach ➢ Inflexible ➢ Have not evolved ➢ Don’t understand the role they play
  124. 124. Kanku Model ➢ Kanku Kata ➢ Skills for success in ITSM and life ➢ 4 key behaviours ➢ 5 key attributes ITSM Skills
  125. 125. ➢ Understand the business ➢ Understand your customer ➢ Know what good looks like ➢ Empathise with the customer ➢ Measure / Listen / Communicate ITSM Skills
  126. 126. ➢ Take responsibility, be honest with yourself ➢ Focus on continuous improvement ➢ Don’t accept average ➢ Measure and look for new ways to improve ➢ Pride in getting things right first time ➢ Work hard (obsession is what lazy people call dedication) ➢ Improve strengths ITSM Skills
  127. 127. ➢ Create Win/Win outcomes ➢ Empathy ➢ Being loyal to those not present gains the trust of those who are. Trust comes from integrity ➢ Intelligent disobedience ➢ There is a right time to do the wrong thing and the wrong time to do the right thing ➢ The greatest gift you can give is your time ITSM Skills
  128. 128. ➢ Keep getting back up (fall down 7, stand up 8) ➢ Evolve and adapt ➢ Look after yourself (Sleep, eat, drink, stay fit) ➢ Keep looking ahead, identify risks ➢ “Time away from work is an investment in future productivity” ➢ You cant always choose your situation but you can choose your attitude ITSM Skills
  129. 129. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted” - Measure what is important and not what is easy. Albert Einstein. ITSM Skills Measure Innovate Be Positive Have Integrity Be Brave Be Brave “Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower”. Steve Jobs. “A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty”. Winston Churchill. “I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.” Nelson Mandela “The supreme quality for leadership is unquestionably integrity. Without it, no real success is possible, no matter whether it is on a section gang, a football field, in an army, or in an office”. Dwight D Eisenhower.
  130. 130. Agile ➢ Customer Value ➢ Openness to other ideas ➢ Continued focus on improvement ➢ Trust ➢ Take responsibility ➢ Collaboration ITSM Skills Measure Innovate Be Positive Have Integrity Be Brave Be Brave
  131. 131. ➢ More Service Management decathletes ➢ Less specialist experts ➢ Automation is key ➢ Enterprise tooling is more important ITSM Skills Measure Innovate Be Positive Have Integrity Be Brave Be Brave
  132. 132. ➢ How do you get a machine to learn intelligent disobedience ? ➢ There will always be a human behind world class service. ITSM Skills Measure Innovate Be Positive Have Integrity Be Brave Be Brave
  133. 133. ➢ The attributes for success in Service Management today are not fundamentally different than the ones that got us here ➢ We need to tweak our processes to fit today’s world, not throw them away ➢ Good people make the difference not following a rigid process ➢ We are the doormen of great service. But like doormen we can be a misunderstood breed.
  134. 134. Brian.crighton@btinternet.com http://linkedin.com/in/brian-crighton-b5846138
  135. 135. UP NEXT www.it500.solutions see for session details
  136. 136. Change Management in a Digital World Adapting your ITSM Processes to support the DevOps movement
  137. 137. Agenda What are the challenges around Change Management? • The need to be fast • Two areas of the organisation with competing ideals? Exploring the truth, dispelling some myths Some Practical Ways Forward • Mode 2 Change • Using Better Questions Key Takeaways and Points for Discussion
  138. 138. The Tension Development teams are under pressure to deliver faster, but struggle with: One size fits all processes Paperwork intensive change submissions Bureaucratic meetings which overrun and are oversubscribed, diluting value Lead times designed long ago and which have not been reviewed Everyone tarnished with same brush ITSM team are under pressure to delivery stability and efficiency, but struggle with: Lack of quality in change submissions Projects not giving due consideration to NFRs and operability Protecting legacy platforms and preventing more technical debt Spaghetti Architecture that only ‘Brent’ knows Audits!
  139. 139. So, is the ITIL framework and the DevOps philosophy really at odds with one another?
  140. 140. DevOps ‘OR’ ITIL? Value Realisation Reliability and Stability Fitness for Purpose and Use Speed Collaboration Pre-built Operability Credit: Troy DuMoulin (Pink Elephant Podcast)
  141. 141. Some Views from the Industry Gene Kim: ITIL and ITSM still are best codifications of the business processes that underpin IT Operations, and actually describe many of the capabilities needed into order for IT Operations to support a DevOps-style work stream. More importantly though, ITSM practitioners are uniquely equipped to help in DevOps initiatives, and create value for the business. Purple Griffon Interview of 25 Leaders: “So yes, I believe DevOps, done correctly, embraces the same interests that ITIL wants to protect. I believe a visionary, determined, and diplomatic leader can run their systems with a DevOps approach, informed by ITIL.” “ITIL® is a framework and DevOps is a philosophy, nothing about them makes them inherently incompatible.” “I strongly believe that the core ITIL and ITSM guidance and processes are and will remain relevant. Customers will always require services and services will always need to be managed. Nowhere in 2000 pages of the ITIL library is there a single suggestion that ITSM processes should be difficult to follow and bureaucratic.” https://purplegriffon.com/blog/is-itil-agile-enough https://www.infoq.com/news/2015/06/itil-vs-devops
  142. 142. What Does Shift Left Actually Mean? • ITSM and the Agile/DevOps teams need to work together to succeed. Faster and more reliable change delivery is the key. But how? • The ability to ‘shift left’ is largely technology driven • Containerised platforms and microservices • CI/CD Pipelines • Automated test tools • Code quality checking • What actually shifts left? • Documentation Handover • Monitoring and Alerting • Testing • Security • Version Control • Configuration Management • Operations Handover
  143. 143. So, how do we reconcile these two approaches within Change Management?
  144. 144. Creating a New Path Create a new Path Automated “end-to-end” deployment and back- out Deployment steps are the playbook – remove the Deployment Guide (that no one uses) Configuration Management controlled in pipeline tools Free up CMDB processes and ensure environment alignment A ‘degree’ of automated testing A track record is built up Operations are fully aligned Business Agreement How? Have a formal application process Work with the business to have an agreed outage window Expect and plan for some initial issues, design feedback loops Enjoy the benefits Shorter lead times – 1 day Limited approvals – possibly 1 person. Continue to automate - Integration with change tool
  145. 145. Use Better Questions How can we build speed into our KPIs? How can we reduce approvers? What is the cost of not implementing the change? How do we create feedback loops that create CSI? How can we ‘offload’ NFR checks safely? What extra process, meeting or check can we put in place? How many extra people do we need to cope with this? Questionsthatwillmoveyouforward Questionsthatwillkeepyouwhereyouare
  146. 146. So What Next? Frameworks are only rigid and inflexible if you made them that way There is no one framework – adaptation required on all sides Everyone has to work together to remove existing technical debt Teams need greater empowerment and incentives that are aligned Start thinking about re-training your CM/QA staff… We need to start asking better questions
  147. 147. Why we should ditch the 3-tier support model… and start swarming! Jon Hall Principal Product Manager, BMC @jonhall_
  148. 148. “First I speak with someone who doesn’t know very much… Then I speak with the person who knows a bit more…”
  149. 149. LEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 2 SUPPORTLEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 1 SUPPORT Classic “Tiered” Support Structure
  150. 150. Escalation Escalation Classic “Tiered” Support Structure LEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 2 SUPPORTLEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 1 SUPPORT LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS
  151. 151. …when the answer is here… …or here. Issues may spend time here LEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 2 SUPPORTLEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 1 SUPPORT LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS
  152. 152. LEVEL 1 SUPPORT LEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS When tickets eventually escalate… …they frequently bounce back for clarification
  153. 153. LEVEL 1 SUPPORT LEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 1 SUPPORT LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 2 SUPPORT SUBJECT MATTER EXPERT The system encourages “heroes” (not in a good way)
  154. 154. involves removing the tiers of support, and calling on the collective expertise of a “swarm” of analysts. https://www.serviceinnovation.org/intelligent-swarming/ Swarming…
  155. 155. Swarming Network Collaborative Dynamic, loopy Measured by value creation Tiered support Siloes and hierarchies Directed Linear, rigid Measured on activity
  156. 156. Global Support 24 hours, 365 days. Over 500 support specialists with over 2,600 years of combined experience 200,000+ incidents addressed each year Hiring focus on communication skills Best Practices Knowledge-centred support (KCS) Industry Benchmarking Quality Management Processes Problem Management Collaboration and Swarming Support, Communities and Social Media BMC Contact Centres Support Centres Support Centres Co-located with R&D Pleasanton/ Sunnyvale Houston Austin McLean/ Herndon Lexington Sao Paulo Buenos Aires Spain Dublin Winnersh Amsterdam Paris Tel Hai Pune Singapore Shanghai Beijing Seoul Dalian Tokyo Melbourne Houston, TX, USA Dublin, Ireland Dalian China BMC Customer Support
  157. 157. Swarming at BMC Dispatch SwarmSeverity 1 Swarm Backlog Swarm
  158. 158. Severity 1 Swarm Prioritise Swarming Process at BMC
  159. 159. • Rapid responders • Three agents on a scheduled one-week rotation • Primary focus: Provide immediate response, and resolve as soon as possible Swarm lead Communications Other members Research, coordinate, test Severity 1 Swarm
  160. 160. Severity 1 Swarm Local Dispatch Swarm Prioritise 30% solved here Swarming Process at BMC
  161. 161. • “Cherry pickers” • Meet every 60-90 minutes • Primary focus: Can new tickets be resolved immediately? • Also: Validation of ticket details before assignment to specialists Experienced analyst Less-experienced analyst Dispatch Swarm
  162. 162. Local Product-Line Support Teams Severity 1 Swarm Local Dispatch Swarm Prioritise Swarming Process at BMC
  163. 163. Local Product Line Support Teams Severity 1 Swarm Local Dispatch Swarm Prioritise Severity 1 Swarm Local Dispatch Swarm Prioritise Local Product Line Support Teams Swarming Process at BMC
  164. 164. Local Product Line Support Teams Local Product Line Support Teams Backlog Swarm Backlog Swarm Backlog Swarm Swarming Process at BMC
  165. 165. • Global fixers of troublesome tickets • Meet weekly • Primary focus: Challenging tickets brought by local support teams • Take the place of individual subject-matter-expert escalation Experienced analysts R&D Engineers Backlog Swarms
  166. 166. • Emphasis on good decisions – guidelines not rules • Metrics had to change (Swarming breaks traditional ones!) • People needed help to become newly customer facing • Personal escalations to subject matter experts forbidden • Focus on tooling – mobile and chat Making it work
  167. 167. • 25% median resolution time improvement • Customer satisfaction up 8 points • More issues closed in <2 days • Significant reduction in backlogs • Halved onboarding time • Freed resources for innovative offerings Results at BMC
  168. 168. “IT organizations that have tried to custom- adjust current tools to meet DevOps practices have a failure rate of 80%” DevOps and the Cost of Downtime: Fortune 1000 Best Practice Metrics Quantified (IDC, 2014) Can Swarming help bridge the DevOps gap?
  169. 169. DevOps adoption in established enterprises “Startup-like” teams formed. New products, Ad-hoc support. Enterprise ITSM “adopts” support of products.
  170. 170. • Work-in-progress queues • Asynchronous communication • Single role teams • Individual over-exposure • Lack of knowledge sharing How to annoy a DevOps practitioner
  171. 171. LEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 2 SUPPORTLEVEL 2 SUPPORT LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 3 SPECIALISTS LEVEL 1 SUPPORT Where have we seen those things before?
  172. 172. Swarming aligns really well to DevOps • Autonomy and self-organisation • Knowledge transfer and skills development • ChatOps, not email • Prevention of accumulation of queued work • Protection of individuals from burnout
  173. 173. Development Operations Before transformation: Application1 Application2 Support Example: an EU National Mapping agency
  174. 174. Development Operations Team Leader Support Specialist Application1 Application2 After DevOps Transformation: Example: an EU National Mapping agency
  175. 175. ChatOps!
  176. 176. “The traditional model of support creates a lot of problems. It creates queues and handoffs. It also creates organisational boundaries. They don’t generate new knowledge to fix the system.” Scott Prugh (@scottprugh), DevOps Enterprise Summit, November 2017
  177. 177. “We are recommending the swarm model. We still have a helpdesk. The helpdesk facilitates the call… annotates... works the timeline. The people with the expertise swarm it because they have the knowledge to fix the problem.” Scott Prugh (@scottprugh), DevOps Enterprise Summit, November 2017
  178. 178. • Suggest Swarm participants based on contributions • Encourage and reward • Learn from each interaction • Improve reliance of next interaction • “Reputation” model Making Swarming Intelligent
  179. 179. “I have probably doubled my knowledge of the products in a year because of Swarming, and I have been here a long time” - Senior Support Analyst, BMC
  180. 180. Digital Service Management Melding Digital Delivery with more traditional Service Management without blunting the edges of both Andy Giles, Director of Business Development, Mozaic
  181. 181. About Mozaic Who we are –Specialists in Service Integration –Independent –Highly respected across the IT industry –Recognised by Gartner as Service Integration specialists –Practical, operationally focused and collaborative How we deliver –Assess the “size of the prize” –Design your Processes, Governance, and Supporting Tooling –Supporting you to Transform your estate –Operate all or part of Service Integration capabilities for you What we do –Build the best future operating model for your estate –Implement and Operate Service Integration models –Improve services whilst addressing IT Cost and Complexity –Provide transparency and control of your estate © 2017 | 199
  182. 182. A full lifecycle of change The “Typical” Approach Assess A full assessment of your current estate, the development of a target operating model based on the Mozaic standard services framework and value the benefits for its delivery Transform The transition to your target operating model and realisation of the associated benefit, making use of transformational and continuous service improvement techniques Accelerate The detailed design of your delivery strategy supporting the target operating model, including; retained IT organisation, Service Integration services, and outsourced delivery and project towers Operate The operation of Service Integration functions providing support to your existing retained IT organisation or provision of full service as your agent to manage and control delivery © 2017 | 200
  183. 183. A Selection Of Our Clients © 2017 | 201
  184. 184. Digital Service Management The next generation of delivery models? © 2017 | 202
  185. 185. Traditional ‘Service Management’ Model The key strengths of the traditional model are: • Robust, consistent and repeatable platforms • Clear lines on accountability • Financially efficient • Predictable performance • Skills readily available The key weaknesses of the traditional model are: • Can be slow to respond to changing business needs • Separation of lifecycle stages creates increased ‘transition’ requirements • Voice of small user groups can be hard to hear BUSINESS ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY & ARCHITECTURE SERVICE INTEGRATION SERVICE TOWER SERVICE TOWER SYSTEMS INTEGRATION PROGRAMME PROJECT DEMAND SUPPLY BUSINESS UNIT BUSINESS UNIT BUSINESS UNIT BUSINESS UNIT © 2017 | 203
  186. 186. Typical ‘Digital’ Model The key strengths of the Digital model are: • Fast to respond to changing business needs • Voice of the customer is at the heart of delivery • Product-based approach lead to efficient transition into operation. • Lower Executive level overheads PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT STRATEGY The key weaknesses of the Digital model are: • Higher costs as low levels of repeatable platforms • Performance can be unpredictable • Skills are in high demand • Accountability for decision-making is not always clear © 2017 | 204
  187. 187. The most common challenge; I need to become more agile? The rate of change is ever increasing… • Digital development is increasingly producing outputs that are business critical and need to be fully resilient and properly supported; • Service Management has often become too governance heavily, slowing delivery with a complex set of processes that frustrate rather than enable change; • Waterfall change delivery requires significant up-front commitment and can be slow to deliver benefits to the business; • New tooling capabilities can enable automation, and these can be used to drive agility in many of the traditional service management and operational areas; • Having separate ‘Digital’ and ‘IT’ approaches is unsustainable (wasteful, encouraging duplication, not standardised, operationally risky, potentially costly, culturally unappealing and divisive); © 2017 | 205
  188. 188. BUSINESS ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY & ARCHITECTURE SERVICE INTEGRATION SERVICE TOWER SERVICE TOWER SYSTEMS INTEGRATION PROGRAMME PROJECT DEMAND SUPPLY BUSINESS UNIT BUSINESS UNIT BUSINESS UNIT BUSINESS UNIT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT STRATEGY Typical Digital Delivery Models Traditional Enterprise IT Models Integrated Digital Service Management Digital Service Management? PRODUCT TEAM PRODUCT TEAM PRODUCT TEAM B U S I N E S S U S E R S PRODUCT TEAM PRODUCT TEAM CAPABILITIES CAPABILITIES CONT ROLS © 2017 | 206
  189. 189. There are four types of Controls • Strategy & Architecture sets out the high level vision and strategy, and the architectural principles that should be applied when delivering Products and Capabilities. • Governance describes the the decision-making structures, including delegated authority and responsibilities. • Processes describe the processes that will be used to progress work. • Policies & Standards describe all of the standards and policies (e.g. security, procurement, regulatory) that should be applied to the delivery of Products and Capabilities. There are broadly three types of Capability • Technology capabilities form the technical platform that underpins the delivery of Products. • People capabilities provide the professional resource pools and governance for aspects of delivery (Programme & Project Management, Application Development CoE etc.) • Service Capabilities enable the service integration and management required to operate and control delivery. Digital Service Management - Key Concepts PRODUCT TEAM PRODUCT TEAM PRODUCT TEAM CAPABILITIES B U S I N E S S U S E R S PRODUCT TEAM PRODUCT TEAM T ECHNOLOGY CAPABILITIES PROCESS GOVERNANCE ST RATEGY & ARCHIT ECTURE POLICIES & STANDARDS CONTROLS PEOPLE CAPABILITIES SERVICE CAPABILITIES © 2017 | 207
  190. 190. The level of mandatory requirements is kept low during the early stages of delivery to allow teams to innovate and explore different options. The level of operational control delivered in each phase increases as Products get closer to Live. Freedom to Innovate Before you start building a service, you need to find out whether users need it and whether similar services exist. In the alpha phase you need to: • build prototypes of your service • test your prototypes with users • demonstrate that the service you want to build is technically possible The objective of the beta phase is to build a working version of the service based on your alpha prototypes. The version you build must be able to handle real transactions and work at scale. The live phase is the time to keep improving your service based on: • user feedback • analytics • your ongoing user research DISCOVERY ALPHA BETA LIVE Optional Controls & Capabilities Mandatory Controls & Capabilities DISCOVERY ALPHA BETA LIVE Optional Controls & Capabilities Mandatory Controls & Capabilities © 2017 | 208
  191. 191. A new operating model • Functions - This describes the functional capabilities required within the IT Operating Model, in order to achieve the business objectives. • Processes - These describe the policies, processes, procedures that enable the effective flow of work through the IT Operating Model. • Governance - This describes the control framework for the IT Operating Model. • Data - This describes the data architecture required to enable the IT Operating Model. • Tools - describes the strategy for implementing these tools necessary to underpin the IT Operating Model and enable high levels of automation. • Sourcing - The functional capabilities can be sourced in various way. This component describes the strategy for sourcing these capabilities. • People- This describes the organisation structure, roles and responsibilities, the strategy for building capability and approach to communications and business change. To make this change work, we need to consider all the standard elements of a good operating model… © 2017 | 209
  192. 192. Three priority areas of focus Organisational Change • Two dimensions • Tensioned • Collaborative Data driven • Architected • Service Orientated • Automation Tooling Automation Systematically Implemented © 2017 | 210
  193. 193. Mozaic Integration Management Continuous Integration Digital Agility Customer Intimacy Workflow Enterprise Performance Governance & Oversight Rigorous Controls Integration Hub APIs Interfaces ServiceManagementTooling DevOpsTooling Repository TraditionalDigital © 2017 | 211
  194. 194. Mozaic Integration Management Service Management Container Management Digital Deployment Source Automation Test Automation Log & Event Management Application Performance Management Provisioning Automation Service Management © 2017 | 212
  195. 195. BUSINESS UNITS SERVICE INTEGRATION SERVICE TOWERS, AGREEMENTS, OLAS and UC’s SUPPLY DEMAND CMDB All underpinned by strong data The Service Architecture needs to cover the whole of the IT supply chain: • The businesses and users that consume IT services will be included in the model, using cost centres and staff numbers. • The services delivered by IT to business will be represented in the model. • The relationship between the services that divisions consume and the IT services provided will be described. • The links between IT services, their providers and the service / operating agreements and underpinning contracts will be shown. • All of the above will be captured in the CMDB, which will take feeds from federated ‘golden’ data sources. © 2017 | 213
  196. 196. Business Divisions/Groups that services are delivered to using commonly used structures (e.g. cost centre structures) The Service Groups are the common central language The SSL enables the translation from the Service Groups to Services Delivered by the Providers The IT providers/suppliers, their contracts, the contracted services and associated Resource units and SLAs are connected into the model Service Delivery and Management is supported through the integration of any supplier CMDBs The Service Architecture The data models need to connect the business structures and functions to the end to end services and their value chains of delivery. These can be used to drive automation decisions. © 2017 | 214
  197. 197. Using the Agile Scrum approach to deliver We propose using Agile Scrum to build pace into delivery whilst building organisational responsibilities through early appointment of Process and Service Owners. User Stories Product Backlog Product Owner Sprint Backlog Tasks and Estimates Sprint Planning Scrum Master Daily Scrum: • < 15 Minutes • Done? • Do Next? • Obstacles? Sprint Review: • Team Presents “Features” • Q&A Sprint Retrospective: • What Worked? • What Didn’t? • What Else? Update Product Backlog Sprint 2-4 Weeks © 2017 | 215
  198. 198. Key Takeaways 1. Get all parts of your organisation “talking the same language”. Cultural change is often at the heart of success. Support this change with: • Appropriate measures to tension delivery • Systematic implementation • Dynamically managed 2. Pre-define the governance requirements to enable innovation where appropriate and rigour where needed 3. Automate where-ever possible: • Standardised workflows in Service Management • Integrated with DevOps tools (with acceptance of a level of standardisation) • Data driven PRODUCT TEAM PRODUCT TEAM PRODUCT TEAM CAPABILITIES B U S I N E S S U S E R S PRODUCT TEAM PRODUCT TEAM T ECHNOLOGY CAPABILITIES PROCESS GOVERNANCE ST RATEGY & ARCHIT ECTURE POLICIES & STANDARDS CONTROLS PEOPLE CAPABILITIES SERVICE CAPABILITIES © 2017 | 216
  199. 199. Questions? © 2017 | 217 Andy Giles, Director of Business Development Andy.gilesmozaic.net
  200. 200. 218 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential© 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential ITOM for today and tomorrow Take ITSM to the next level with AI powered Operations Management Gianpaolo Pagano Mariano Senior Solution Architect, ITOM
  201. 201. 219 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Lack of Service Visibility I can’t tell which systems are connected to each service. Slow Response & Resolution We need to identify problems fast, and fix them even faster. Unreliable Service Availability If a service component goes down, we don’t know about it until it’s too late. Challenges IT Operations Teams Face Today
  202. 202. 220 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Companies Invest, Yet Outages Keep Hitting Profits and Reputations Automation Workflows Change Advisory Board Operations Analytics Network Monitoring Server Monitoring Application Performance Management Configuration Management Databases IT Service Management Change Management Alerting Collaboration
  203. 203. 221 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential IT Operations Stages 1 and 2: Chaotic and Reactive Component view Fire fighting Alert monitoring Manual correlation Reactive Ad hoc Notification via user calls No centralized helpdesk Chaotic
  204. 204. 222 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential IT Operations Stage 3: Single Pane Unified view Service impact analysis view Report on service level agreements Single Pane Component view Fire fighting Alert monitoring Manual correlation Reactive Ad hoc Notification via user calls No centralized helpdesk Chaotic
  205. 205. 223 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Change Discovered CIs Events and Alerts Service-oriented Service Management Infrastructure-oriented Operations Management Service Meets Infrastructure on a Single, Cloud-based Platform Service Catalog Incident Problem Servers Applications Storage Virtualization Cloud NetworkCMDB Service-aware
  206. 206. 224 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Consolidate Events into ServiceNow • Collect, filter, and normalize events from multiple monitoring tools • Rapidly understand impact to service
  207. 207. 225 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Proactively Identify Service Issues • Know the status of critical business services through a single dashboard. • IT will be the first to know before problems arise.
  208. 208. 226 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Pinpoint Disruptions • Quickly identify the business services experiencing problems. • Review infrastructure and operational data and understand the impact of change to determine root cause and gain insight into the best approach for resolution.
  209. 209. 227 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Automate Remediation Reduce time to resolution by: • Automating common remediation activities • Initiating the incident process, gain approvals as needed, and continually communicate with all stakeholders through resolution on a single platform
  210. 210. 228 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential IT Operations Stage 4: Predictive Machine learning-based alert correlation Anomaly detection Root cause analysis Predictive alerts Predictive Unified view Service impact analysis view Report on service level agreements Single Pane Component view Fire fighting Alert monitoring Manual correlation Reactive Ad hoc Notification via user calls No centralized helpdesk Chaotic
  211. 211. 229 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Operational Intelligence: Anomaly Detection Detect potential issues in your IT infrastructure not detected by events Dynamic thresholds Anomaly detection
  212. 212. 230 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Operational Intelligence: Metric Explorer Correlated operational metrics over time Compare infrastructure metrics to better understand probable causes of issues
  213. 213. 231 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Event Management: Predictive Alerts Feeds predictive alert into the service health dashboard for fast action Machine-learning capabilities identify follow-on issues and generate alerts to take action Predicts the probability of future events
  214. 214. 232 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential© 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved REDUCED EVENT OVERLOAD BY 99.2% From 120,000 events per week to less than 1,000 incidents Customer logos are the trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders and not ServiceNow “With ServiceNow, we’re much more proactive. Because of this, we’ve actually reduced the number of high-impact incidents, and we’re resolving them more quickly.” - Olga Krasovski Director of Service Management at Time Warner
  215. 215. 233 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential© 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved “By consolidating our monitoring and managing our events consistently, ServiceNow Event Management gives us the ability and confidence to take on new challenges.” - Seth Thomas Director, Site Operations at Zillow Reduce thousands of events into less than 100 incidents Customer logos are the trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders and not ServiceNow AUTOMATICALLY CLOSES THE MAJORITY OF INCIDENTS
  216. 216. 234 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Customer logos are the trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders and not ServiceNow ACHIEVED AN OUTAGE REDUCTION OF 80% “By the time our users notice a service issue, we’ve already told them about it and we’re working on a fix” - Jamie Duncalf Manager, IT Operations at TransAlta
  217. 217. 235 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Wrap-up and Key Take Aways ServiceNow ITOM + ITSM = complete solution for preventing service outages The ServiceNow difference: • Single platform, cloud-first, service-centric • Single dashboard • Predictive / preventive capabilities How to prevent service outages: • Anomaly detection (Operational Intelligence) • Predictive alerts (Event Management) • Metric explorer (Operational Intelligence)
  218. 218. 236 © 2017 ServiceNow All Rights Reserved Confidential Q & A Thank you for joining us. Gianpaolo Pagano Mariano IT Operations ServiceNow
  219. 219. 237 Lessons learned from The Phoenix Project DevOps Business Simulation at IT in the Park, Edinburgh, 28 Nov 2017 Facilitated by Eppo Luppes & Mark Smalley
  220. 220. 238 A professional movement based on a set of emerging insights for the “continuous”-centric application of Lean, Agile and other principles and practices by multiple IT and IT-related disciplines, leading to capabilities that achieve fast delivery of resilient IT services with a healthy workforce, leading to bottom line benefits DevOps
  221. 221. 239 Continuous integration, delivery and deployment Highly automated processes Security, compliance etc. embedded into daily work Loosely-coupled software architecture Flow, feedback, and continual learning and experimentation Data-driven, scientifically methodical, engineering-oriented Value Stream Mapping, Kanban, Toyota Kata Generative culture DevOps
  222. 222. 240 The Phoenix Project business simulation Full day learning by doing 8-12 participants Based on the book The Phoenix Project Business, Dev and Ops roles Issues from the book Experiencing typical DevOps challenges Bringing real value to the business Simulating real life issues
  223. 223. 241 • Manufactures and sells car parts • Faces financial difficulties • Relies on ‘The Phoenix Project’ to increase sales revenue and improve share price • Business and IT must work together to make this project a success © GamingWorks The Company: Parts Unlimited
  224. 224. 242 • Increase sales in the next 4 rounds to $ 300.000 • Increase profitability • Share price back to $ 45 © GamingWorks Business Objectives
  225. 225. 243 The Parts Unlimited team © GamingWorks Roles
  226. 226. 244 Req Dev Ops Use Inv Val Inf Bus Info App Infra Bus Info App Infra End-to-End Value Stream
  227. 227. 245 “There is a role for training and books – the goal of experiential learning is ... to provide low risk ways to try working in a different way ... there’s no better way than through simulations.” – Gene Kim Experiential learning – based on © GamingWorks
  228. 228. 246 Potential objectives of the simulation • Explore and experience the essence of DevOps • Understand DevOps culture and behavioural aspects • Discover the benefits of DevOps for your teams • Experience how to adopt DevOps principles • Explore key success factors for DevOps adoption Potential benefits © GamingWorks
  229. 229. 247 © GamingWorks ✓Understand business context ✓Set right business priorities  Visualise value stream(s) ✓Visualise work in progress ✓Provide feedback/feedforward  Identify & elevate bottlenecks  Focus on waste ✓Limit WIP (pull > push) ✓ Develop cross-functional teams  Shift-left testing  Work with Agile/MVP concept of small batch sizes ✓ Use Andon cord to stop & swarm, & solve problems ✓ Continually learn & experiment ✓ Foster collaborative culture  … Actual lessons learned today
  230. 230. 248 © GamingWorks ✓Understand business context  Set right business priorities ✓Visualise value stream(s) ✓Visualise work in progress ✓Provide feedback/feedforward  Identify & elevate bottlenecks  Focus on waste  Limit WIP (pull > push) ✓ Develop cross-functional teams ✓ Shift-left testing ✓ Work with Agile/MVP concept of small batch sizes ✓ Use Andon cord to stop & swarm, & solve problems ✓ Continually learn & experiment ✓ Foster collaborative culture  … Relevant takeaways for tomorrow
  231. 231. Kevin Holland SIAM and Service Management Consultant Chief Examiner EXIN SIAM® qualifications @SIAMspecialist All copyrights acknowledged
  232. 232. What is Service Integration and Management? A management methodology to:  govern  manage  integrate  assure  co-ordinate the delivery of services from multiple service providers
  233. 233. Service Integrator External Service provider External service provider SIAM Layers Internal service provider Customer organisation External service provider
  234. 234. Areas for consideration 1. Incident recording & classification 2. Incident prioritisation 3. Initial diagnosis 4. Incident escalation and flow 5. Incident resolution and closure 6. Tools 7. Different service desk models
  235. 235. 1. Recording & classification Language and terminology He’s knackered his kecks Er hat seine hose beschadigt He’s damaged his pants Il a endommage ses pantalons I’ve goosed my breeks
  236. 236. 1. Recording & classification Language and terminology Shared data dictionary Service catalogue, with hierarchy Record content Minimum dataset Can be service specific What’s the model number of his trousers?
  237. 237. 2. Incident prioritisation Here’s a priority 2 incident about Fred’s damaged trousers Wow, that must be really serious! We’ll kick off our major incident process immediately!
  238. 238. 2. Incident prioritisation  How did that happen?  Fix: Consistent understanding & mapping of priorities across the ecosystem Service Integrator Service provider 1 Service provider 2 Service provider 3 1 1 1 5 2 2 2 4 3 3 3 4 2 5 1 Service Integrator Service provider 1 Service provider 2 Service provider 3 1 1 1 5 2 2 2 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 2 5 5 1
  239. 239. 3. Initial diagnosis - essentials  Knowledge base  Diagnostic steps from service providers  Supporting diagnostic tools  Understanding of end-to-end architecture  Cross-service incident correlation  Graphical view  Monitoring tools  Service provider view  End-to-end view  User experience view
  240. 240. 4. Escalation and flow  Must have accurate and rapid transfer  Carefully design and document  Include:  Flow between different parties  Interactions  Roles and responsibilities
  241. 241. Who do you pass the incident to first?  Depends on  Affected service  Other services affected  Details of the disruption  Service architecture  Type of service provider  ………  Will vary by service INTELLIGENT TRIAGE
  242. 242. Service Desk HostingNetworks Sequential escalation Application support Desktop support Users ? !!!???!!!
  243. 243. Service Desk HostingNetworks Simultaneous incident flow Application support Desktop support Users Joint working With Monitoring and alerting
  244. 244. Who owns the incident?  All desks own it until resolved, even when passed to another desk / resolver Please can I have an update on my incident? We’ve passed it onto the service provider, its not ours anymore
  245. 245. Further information requests  What’s the process if a service provider needs further information?  How do you request help from other service providers? Direct or back up the chain? Quelle est sa mesure de la jambe a l’interieur? The supplier wants to know if you can measure the inside door Design the best flow for efficient resolution
  246. 246. 5. Resolution and closure  When is an incident closed?  Contracts and service levels drive behaviours  Passing on/back to buy time  Manipulating incident priorities  Saying it’s fixed when it isn’t
  247. 247. 6. Tools  Real-time integration to support:  Rapid flow of data and information  Visibility of status  User satisfaction  Requires:  Data and information exchange standards  Technical interchange definitions  ‘Business’ Interchange definitions -> Raise incident –> creation confirmed
  248. 248. All use same tool Integrate Point to point Integrate via a Hub
  249. 249. Tool integration options Option Pros Cons All use same tool • Easy to integrate • One tool to maintain • Providers may not accept • Access control • License management • Data confidentiality • ‘Swivel chair’ Integrate point-to- point Service providers keep same toolset • Slow to establish • Complex to maintain Integrate using central hub • Service providers keep same toolset • Speed of implementation • Straightforward integration • Easier to maintain • Adds another tool
  250. 250. Who provides the first line service desk? 1. Customer 2. Service integrator 3. One of the service providers 4. Specialist third party 5. Hybrid The correct answer will depend on the circumstances
  251. 251. Summary  The challenges are the same pre-SIAM, but the extent and impact to users is greater  Engage brain when designing service desk and incident models for SIAM  Knowledge is the key to success
  252. 252. Questions Siamspecialist@outlook.com @SIAMspecialist SIAM® Foundation BoK www.scopism.com/downloads SIAM® Foundation qualification www.exin.com and www.bcs.org AXELOS SIAM whitepapers https://www.axelos.com/case-study-and-white-paper-search

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