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Acute Limb Ischemia Fortis 2009

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Take Steps to Learn About P.A.D. is a national awareness campaign to increase public and health care provider awareness about peripheral arterial disease.

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Acute Limb Ischemia Fortis 2009

  1. 1. Limb ischemia
  2. 2. Vessels of the Body
  3. 3. Differentiate between acute and chronic ischemia
  4. 4. Arm ischemia
  5. 5. Acute limb Ischaemia • Pain • Pallor • Pulseless • Parasthesia • Paralysis
  6. 6. Leg artery embolism • Sudden • No Hx of PVD • Opposite limb normal • Identifiable source • 80% AF • 10% post MI • 10% aneurysm
  7. 7. Arm embolism
  8. 8. Femoral Embolectomy
  9. 9. Arm embolectomy
  10. 10. Faciotomy
  11. 11. Acute limb Ischaemia Skin > 48hrs Permanent muscle damage > 6hrs Nerve damage > 30 mins
  12. 12. Late presentation
  13. 13. This is what we don’t want
  14. 14. Acute limb Ischaemia- Thrombolysis
  15. 15. Acute on chronic leg ischemia
  16. 16. Acute on chronic leg ischemia
  17. 17. Left Iliac stenting
  18. 18. Left Femoropopliteal graft
  19. 19. What is this ?
  20. 20. Iatrogenic
  21. 21. Post Femoral line
  22. 22. Post PTCA
  23. 23. Arterial line
  24. 24. Aneurysm
  25. 25. Popliteal aneurysm
  26. 26. Cervical rib
  27. 27. ICU
  28. 28. Trauma
  29. 29. Aortic trauma
  30. 30. Aortic injury
  31. 31. Other diseases
  32. 32. Distal arterial occlusion
  33. 33. Chronic ischemia 58 M, smoker, non DM, HT, CAD, 6 month history of rest pain, Mild RF
  34. 34. Proximal arterial occlusion MRA
  35. 35. Hybrid procedure Fem Fem cross overRight Iliac stenting
  36. 36. Varicose veins
  37. 37. Laser
  38. 38. Venous ulcer treatment with laser
  39. 39. Venous Gangrene
  40. 40. Act Fast
  41. 41. What should be done ?
  42. 42. Take Steps to Learn About P.A.D. is a national awareness campaign to increase public and health care provider awareness about peripheral arterial disease Stay in Circulation

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