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Social marketing

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social marketing

Social marketing

  1. 1. . V 1‘ T > 7” -s . 9 “ V '| .. ~ l l i l l [V I I I ’l " , ' ' 4 .5-— . h ‘ _ ‘F l I l‘ - . l _ I —, ~_-— . " ”? .~ -_ I ‘_ . 1 . I ' v‘ . ' 4 ' ' I '. 1‘ « . , I C ‘ . 7;‘ ’. ~. , ‘_ V
  2. 2. Last Year Health - An estimated 1 million teens became pregnant. - 5-10 million adolescent girls and women struggled with eating disorders. - Each day, more than 4,000 youths aged 11 to 17 tried their first cigarette. Safety - More than 16,000 people were killed in alcohol- related crashes. ° More than 3,000 children and teens died from gunshot wounds. Environment - 4 million tons of paper were thrown away in garbage. - 4.5 trillion non-biodegradable cigarette butts were littered worldwide. - Community More than 5,000 people on waiting lists for organ transplants died. ' Only 51% of eligible voters voted in the U. S. presidential election.
  3. 3. Social Marketing Social Marketing is the Practice of Utilizing the Philosophy, Tools, and Practices of Commercial Marketing for Health and/ or Social Programs. Social Marketing Sells a Behavior Change to a Targeted Group of Individuals - Accept a New Behavior - Reject a Potential Behavior * Modify a Current Behavior - Abandon an Old Behavior
  4. 4. Examples of Social Marketing ° Accept a New Behavior - Take a Folic Acid Supplement (reduce incidence of birth defects) ° Reject a Potential Behavior ° Don’t Drink Alcohol While Pregnant (reduce incidence of birth defects) ° Modify a Current Behavior - Drink > 8 Glasses of Water Daily (reduce incidence of birth defects) ° Abandon an Old Behavior ° If You Smoke, Quit (reduce incidence of birth defects)
  5. 5. Process of Social Marketing ° Define Problem - Based on Analysis, Community Assessment Already Completed - Identify Behavior Change/ Actions That Could Reduce/ Eliminate Problem - Identify Potential Audience for Marketing Intervention ° Segment and Target Market ° Conduct Formative Research to ID Perceived Benefits/ Barriers
  6. 6. Process of Social Marketing ° Conduct Root Cause Analysis (Ask Why? ) ° Establish Goals/ Objectives for Program ° Design Appropriate Strategy of Manipulating 4 (5) P's - Deliver Program and Monitor ° Evaluate the Program
  7. 7. I Corporate Social responsibility 1 CSR) gt ,3 ii‘. I. .. 3; l. -'l~“"l 3! "v I '‘-; ’43 V ‘ . V’, " . _. —'J
  8. 8. CSR- Corporate Social Responsibility Canadian Government “CSR is generally understood to be the way a company achieves a balance or integration ofeconomic, environmental and social im eratives while at the same time a dressin shareholder and stakehol er expectations. ” Social Contract (Donaldson, 1982; Donaldson and Dunfee, 1999) — There is a tacit social contract between the firm and society; the contract bestows certain rights in exchange for certain responsibilities.
  9. 9. CSR- Corporate Social Responsibility Stakeholder Theory (Freeman, 1984) - A stakeholder is “any group or individual who can affect or is affected by the achievement of an organization's purpose. ” Argues that it is in the company’s strategic interest to respect the interests of all its stakeholders. . . :1 1“ ~; "”'°». gcidgb % gunk
  10. 10. Ethical Responsibilities Social Responsibilities Legal Responsibilities Economic Responsibilities
  11. 11. Key Issues in CSR - Labour rights: - child labour - forced labour - right to organize ° safety and health Environmental conditions ° water & air emissions - climate change Human rights ' cooperation with paramilitary forces - complicity in extra—judicial killings Poverty Alleviation - job creation ° public revenues - skills and technology
  12. 12. Key drivers of CSR Around the world * NGO Activism ° Responsible investment - Litigation * Gov & IGO initiatives Developing Countries ' Foreign customers - Domestic consumers - FDI ' Government & IGO
  13. 13. Spectrum of CSR Poor CSR -No employment -No concern for indirect effect (land. water, air) -Destruction of agricultural land -Not willing to listen to other stakeholders -Appropriate of land not being compensated 7 -Non compliance of rule of land Good -Taking care of workers -Low dependence on non renewable resources -High awareness about CSR initiatives -Land compensation -Increased monitoring system -Environment responsibility
  14. 14. Sphere of Influence WhO — is to be influenced? Sphere of Influence: the ‘Association Spher1e"— partners in the global value chain I Govt. Authorities Supplier Supplier Supplier Customer Customer Consumer 3 2 1 1 2 JV Partners ]
  15. 15. Sphere of Influence What — issues are to be influenced? Sphere of Influence: the ‘Issue Sphere" - a broader range of issues to be influenced
  16. 16. Sphere of Influence HOW — are those issues to be influenced? Sphere of Influence: the ‘Operational Sphere" - specific processes to be influenced F'r'e. feas1b1I1ty = eas1t-ility Stud: -as ‘Studies Construction Ernp c-yment Monitoring F'reCUC|3S l"ro1e1:t Approval Marketing 8. Investrnent Due Asset Fmtecn O n Sales U1 I1 genre
  17. 17. CSR Management: Plan, Do, Check, Act method Plan [ E ° Consult stakeholders ' Establish management . » t d 1 ° Establish code of conduct l Sys ems an personne ' - P t'” 71 1' . Set targets romo e co e comp iance Act mm Check ° Corrective action ~ ° Measure progress - Reform of systems ‘ - Audit - Report
  18. 18. "°SP°““"‘°‘° Minimalist Stockholders/ Maximizing profit owners Self interested Stockholders/ Do good when owners/ cost furthers quest for “controllers” growth and profit Social contract Those with social Goes beyond law to and legal contract spirit of commitment Stakeholder Those who Develop responsive Management influence direction strategies ' and fortunes Society as whole / Solutions for social future problems
  19. 19. UE REFLAGD OUR STYROFOAM OPS NITH PAPER CUPS, BUT IT'S NOT SO CLEAR THAT IT HELVS THE PLANET. , ' , a O‘ -'_'x't . -"- 1 Ti“ V‘. I‘, .. I , . T‘ .2‘ In K Criticism NE DIDN'T DO IT TO HELP THE PLANET. M 010 IT TO LOOK LIKE TI-if SORT OF COMPANY THAT CARES ABOUT
  20. 20. Socially Responsible Business Models
  21. 21. Socially Responsible Business Models The rapid technological advancements and the environmental factors are important factors to be considered by an organization. The formula to success is to innovate solutions and values in a socially responsible manner. Most companies believe that CSR in the form of cash donations, in-kind contributions, cause marketing and employee volunteerism programs is the “smart thing to do”.
  22. 22. Porter & Kramer Model Capabilities Positioning
  23. 23. ° Strategic CSR results when companies: a. Transform value chain activities to benefit society while reinforcing strategy b. Engage in strategic philanthropy that leverages capabilities to improve salient areas of competitive context By providing jobs, investing capital, purchasing goods, and doing business every day the companies can contribute to a prosperous economy.
  24. 24. Christensen Approach ° To address social problems use catalytic innovations, i. e. offer good enough solutions to inadequately addressed problems. These innovations share five qualities: 1. Create systematic social change through scaling and replication. Meet a need that is improperly met or not met at all. 3. Offer simpler, less costly products and services that may have a lower level of performance but considered good enough . 4. Generate resources, such as donations or grants in ways that are initially unattractive to competitors. 5. Often ignored, or even encouraged by others who deem such an idea as unprofitable and unattractive.
  25. 25. Guidelines to identify companies creating catalytic innovations: 1. Look for signs of disruption in the process : Lookout for pre—existing catalytic innovators in the market. 2. Identify specific catalytic innovations : Apply the five criteria listed. 3. Assess the business model : Check the sustainability and the effectiveness of the innovation for the company.
  26. 26. _i9,_c_i_a_1_l_Cm_1_ Kw‘ . --30-.1, Marketing
  27. 27. Social Cause Related Marketing Definition ° Joint funding and promotional strategy in which a firm's sales are linked (and a percentage of the sales revenue is donated) to a charity or other public cause. However, unlike philanthropy, money spent in cause related marketing is considered an expense and is expected to show a return.
  28. 28. Cause Related Marketing Vs. Strategic Philanthropy Strategic Philanthropy Cause-related Marketing Organizational Product or product line Improve org. competency, ‘Fe org. competency to social lncfease P700001 Sales need or charitable cause Time Frame Ongoing Traditionally limited duration organiz: :[: ’o':3:? zAembers Potentially all employees Marketing and related personell Moderate — align with mission Minimal — alliance devlopment & org. strategies & promotion expenditures Source: .VlcA| islcr, Ferrell and Fcrrcll, Business and Socictygg. Strategic Approach to Social RL‘. Q()f1ilLJ_lm! . 3005. New Y()l‘l. p.339.
  29. 29. Pro duct Manifesto * American Express, Giorgio Armani * Motorola, Converse * Apple, Hallmark * Gap * Dell/ Microsoft * Super Bowl ° $50 ' Configure
  30. 30. Benefits of Cause-Related Marketing Strategic Philanthropy + Business Strategy ‘ Increases visibility - Improve image ° Motivates & retains Employees - Improves bottom line ° Enhances community acceptance ° Distinguishes your product or service ° Builds consumer trust ~ Enhances reputation ° Makes a social impact
  31. 31. Cause-Related Marketing Approaches 1. Transactional - elicits participation with an offer to contribute; short- term; promotional; generates funds; Message Promotion — raises awareness or participation Licensing — name/ cause attached to mission-related product for fee Strategic Alliance — Long-term, deeper level of engagement; aligns with brand; uses all assets
  32. 32. .‘ American T23 I§'1’§'3'l;11L2§; ’»‘. 'I1”. '.‘. "nL. ...1 SUPPORT THE BLOOD BANK R“ °'°-‘*5 3, _ Donate your blood and make a difference Starve a Vam ' . Donate Blood.
  33. 33. Think What you can afford to give - then double it may depend on it , ~do you dare do less? . ‘I, ’ ‘~ 1 I 1 l ‘ i’11 ,1 : - G/ II i _. 2.‘ 7 '15." ‘vi , . 1 '1 -- _ t -. . ‘ll 1 : - 5/.7‘ V‘ ' , A l: I l , ’ ‘. 1 1 “T1 1 . ~1J1.—‘f'? *‘1 ' ' ‘ . ';‘ '1.“ l‘ ‘l’ 9- « 1_t ‘E . r l‘ L P. ‘ 1» T It 4} 1 __ - g N‘ I I ' IT‘ Till‘; l .9} ‘J r ' " V . _, ,.. ;.». ‘., .—, ._ ,1 1 if? ’ (Q) - h . I 4--“'-‘%: ‘;’TT‘Tt. ‘.ll ll l'‘‘‘‘‘ V‘ See Something? Say Something! Wlien it comes to safety, we can 1ll‘1': l)'S use an extra pair of eyes. lllllli lllllllllll. I31‘ . ‘. '.'. l'L'. If something doesn't look right, let us know. 3 ~ - . , _,, ,, "1.lil. '_r '. t"5 CDllr‘1'1 ‘.1:" '. 'll! "1". -‘I )1 Al "' ‘r IF YOU SEE SVDI. -iETll| i'5G, S ‘i'SUi'. *iElll ll . . ‘.l| 11.21 | ~-! «l|
  34. 34. All I Really Need to Know About ,1. - _ - - c —’ 1 3 1 M ‘in cfi , .‘ ‘ - , - 1 _ , — 1 I 7 n 1 -Q T — _ . jag 7 3 Z ’ f ~ 1— gs - ' on a a- ' - _ at—— ll ‘I } 1 _ " , .¢ - —- 1-4; —- 5 f is -— ‘A . I Learned in Kindergarten
  35. 35. All You Really Need to Know. .. Wash your hands before you eat Look! Clean up your own mess Don't take things that aren't yours Don't hit people Play fair When you go out in the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands and stick together Share everything Say you're sorry when you hurt somebody Everything you need to know is in there. .. somewhere Be aware of wonder Sources: All I Need To Know I Learned in Kinderganen. Robert Faughum
  36. 36. All You Really Need to Know. .. ° Wash your hands before you eat - Prepare for success - Define your business objectives ° Look! ° Identifying the right issue or cause - Find the right sponsor ° Align brand with cause ° Clean up your own mess ° Don’t use your cause program to solve ma)or reputational issues
  37. 37. .~. ,/ All You Really Need to Know. .. ° Don't take things that aren't yours ° Craft a program that is unique and “ownable” - Don't hit people - Take them through the steps in order to get buy in; helps to grow programs over time Play Fair ° Be clear about individual and shared objectives ° Make sure the partnership/ collaboration is a win- win for both parties
  38. 38. All You Really Need to Know. .. When you go out in the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands and stick together - Be sure that all partners are delivering a consistent, balanced and clear message Say you’re sorry when you hurt somebody ° Build trust with your partner(s) Share everything ° Integrate your Campaign (advertising, programming, interactive, etc) ° Use your assets
  39. 39. All You Really Need to Know. .. - Everything you need to know is in there. .. somewhere - Make it easy for partners to participate - Show partners how they can leverage assets ° Be aware of wonder — Big things grow from small seeds. Commit to making a social impact! — Track results; balance the quantitative and qualitative; collect stories along the way
  40. 40. c .7!‘
  41. 41. Social Marketing Campaigns Cognitive Behavioral
  42. 42. H =1; ; ~: 5113!. ll slfll. 1-; ..‘r. i.‘r‘, l-or 1 ‘: ' _'r: iT'r. ‘,i: .J; '-‘. .9 ', l:«; l;l; l| [,lI, l.fll. i;l. '3". Where are we? Where do we want to go? ‘ Y How will we get there? is How will we stay on course?
  43. 43. Social Marketing - Key Success Factors ° Study the literature and previous campaigns - Choose appropriate target market ° Promote single, doable behavior in clear, simple terms - Explain benefits on compelling terms ° Make it easy to adopt the behavior ° Develop attention-grabbing messages
  44. 44. Social Marketing and Stages of Change ° People go through a series of five stages in changing behaviors (pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance/ advocacy) ' It takes time to change behaviors, and change is not linear (people regress) ° Messages/ interactions should be targeted to each stage
  45. 45. 1 Pre-contemplation 0 Definition: No awareness of need to modify behavior, and no intention to do so (lack of personal relevance) Messaging: Start helping people to understand the issue — focus on awareness, not persuasion 2 Contemplation 0 Definition: Know that the issue exists and audience members are considering action Messaging: Build on initial understanding; messages can start attempting to influence behavior change
  46. 46. 3 Preparation Definition: Preparing to take action, but not yet engaged in behavior; might be learning about behavior Messaging: Address barriers to change and encourage behavioral “trials” to sample intended behaviors or preparations such as learning where to buy needed tools, etc. . 9'. I (3 y’. ‘p . E ‘ . ‘_ : . ‘fi: " / 4 Action ° Definition: Actually engaging in behavioral change - Messaging: Support, encourage, and reinforce change
  47. 47. 5 Maintenance/ Advocacy Definition: Change has occurred and is being sustained Messaging: Reinforce change and encourage audience to spread the word; people in this stage often can influence others [these people are sometimes called spark plugs or opinion leaders]
  48. 48. _ . I « . . C. ‘ , .I l. . . ..I C . . .3», .5» 5 1.. .0.. r r-. . 4 n. .l. / . ..w '44.: . ll , , it. I '3.. .)/ }. , ~. lI. .1 . »rs I4 is e. 4.. L. ,1._. . I. r . L . .1». I I/ Nil.
  49. 49. Non-Profit Organizations ° lt is an organization that does not distribute its surplus funds to owners or shareholders, but instead uses them to help pursue its goals. -Its primary objective is to support or engage in activities of public interest without any commercial or monetary profit purpose Formation and Registration of a Non - Profit organizations in India. °Trust °Society °Section-25 Company Special Licensing
  50. 50. Profit V Nonprofit Profit: - Ultimate mission is to earn profit for owners * Operated by professionals who are paid for services * Success criteria is clearer. Profit org looks to profitability, bottom line, return on investment, profit margins, market share. Nonprofit: - There are no "owners” but controlling members or boards - NP is there to serve a broad public purpose. - Profits must be directed to public purpose for which the organization was set up. (Remember-— NP gm be profitable! ) * Success criteria is unclear Even quantitative measures are indirect — number of teens participating in activities.
  51. 51. .. .._» ' ° CRY is a non profit organization in India that aims to restore children's right in India. Established in 1979, today CRY is a people's movement for the rights of India's children encompassing diverse segments. Bachpan - Bachpan is a registered non—profit organization working to provide education to poor children in India. Jagriti is non profit Organization registered with Govt. of India and working towards providing basic education and health care to poor children.
  52. 52. .1: Rajiv Gandhi Foundation The Rajiv Gandhi Foundation has historically been working in areas of literacy, health, disability, empowerment of the underprivileged, and livelihoods VISION OF RAIIV GANDHI FOUNDATlON’S WORK IN EDUCATION To create access for the largest number of children to an education that: ° Encourages curiosity, independent thinking and open- mindedness - Enables each child to live by the values of integrity, equality and humanity - Equips each child to realize his/ her full potential. Some of the other prominent NON —PROFlT organizations are Railways, Post- offices.
  53. 53. Thank You

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