The Health of the Irish in        Britain        Conor McGinn  Health Development Officer  Federation of Irish Societies
The Irish in Britain• The Federation of Irish Societies (FIS) is the national  organisation for the Irish in Britain. It p...
The Irish in Britain• The age profile of the Irish community is an older one  with significantly higher numbers in the pos...
The Health of the                            Irish in Britain• Significantly high rates of all-causes mortality  among fir...
The Health of the                                Irish in Britain• Exceptionally high deaths mortality rates for suicides,...
The Health of the                              Irish in Britain• High mental health admissions, attempted suicides,  avera...
Context of the Health                      of the Irish in Britain• Research conducted for the Department of Health (DH)  ...
Taking Steps to Address Irish Health Inequalities• DH should include an Irish category in all monitoring of  health and so...
Taking Steps to Address Irish Health Inequalities• PCTs should facilitate more effective engagement of the  local Irish po...
Actions for          improvement• Recognition  • Access• Engagement
Health of the Irish in Britain
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Health of the Irish in Britain

315 views

Published on

Conor McGinn

Published in: Health & Medicine, Travel
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Health of the Irish in Britain

  1. 1. The Health of the Irish in Britain Conor McGinn Health Development Officer Federation of Irish Societies
  2. 2. The Irish in Britain• The Federation of Irish Societies (FIS) is the national organisation for the Irish in Britain. It promotes the interests of Irish people through community care, welfare advice, health promotion, education, culture and arts, youth and sports activities and information provision. FIS has over 100 affiliate organisations across the country working for the Irish community• In the 2001 Census, approximately 691,000 people in the UK identified themselves within the White Irish category, thus comprising 1% of the population (Census 2001)• 624, 115 persons or 1.3% of the population in England identified as ethnically Irish. Of these, 66% were born in the Republic of Ireland, 9% were born in Northern Ireland and 23% were born in England, this last figure reflecting numbers of those whose parents/grandparents were born in Ireland
  3. 3. The Irish in Britain• The age profile of the Irish community is an older one with significantly higher numbers in the post pension and pre-pension age group• Fewer married couple-households than White British households• 38% of Irish people live in one person households
  4. 4. The Health of the Irish in Britain• Significantly high rates of all-causes mortality among first, second and third generation Irish• The health of the Irish in England is worse than the Irish in Ireland, as well as worse than White English people• There has been no improvement in Irish mortality rates in the last couple of decades
  5. 5. The Health of the Irish in Britain• Exceptionally high deaths mortality rates for suicides, cancers, accidents and respiratory disease, raised rates for coronary heart disease and stroke• Significant incidence and mortality for many cancers affecting both first and second generation Irish, particularly lung cancer• Exceptionally high prevalence of permanent sickness/disability, limiting long-term illness, perception of health being ‘not good’ and highest percentage of special needs households in London
  6. 6. The Health of the Irish in Britain• High mental health admissions, attempted suicides, average use of community mental health services and high rates of GP consulting for psychological problems• Highest rates of heavy smoking and disproportionate use of drug and alcohol treatment services, given wider population figures• Irish Travellers’ health status is comparatively even poorer, although less comprehensive data on Travellers were available. Morbidity data show excessively poor health status both physically and psychologically
  7. 7. Context of the Health of the Irish in Britain• Research conducted for the Department of Health (DH) notes that the BME agenda in Britain has generally excluded Irish people• The Irish are an ‘invisible’ minority aggregated into the overall ‘White’ category despite provisions in the Race Relations Act (2000) and DH/NHS guidelines• Despite overwhelming evidence of significant Irish health disadvantage there has been little attempt of the part of policymakers and practitioners to consider ways of reducing these inequalities
  8. 8. Taking Steps to Address Irish Health Inequalities• DH should include an Irish category in all monitoring of health and social care commissioned services and partner agencies• PCT and social care staff should trained in cultural sensitivity and have knowledge of the health vulnerabilities of the local Irish population• PCTs and local authorities should support Irish community health capacity building• The Irish community should be represented on key local strategic planning and development bodies
  9. 9. Taking Steps to Address Irish Health Inequalities• PCTs should facilitate more effective engagement of the local Irish population in local health matters• Statutory agencies should acknowledge the Irish population in key documents affecting race, ethnicity and health• Increased partnership working and networking between the Irish community, BME groups and statutory sector• DH should support campaigns about Irish health and use social marketing to address the key health issues
  10. 10. Actions for improvement• Recognition • Access• Engagement

×