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ARCProgramOutline2006.doc

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ARCProgramOutline2006.doc

  1. 1. ATTACHMENT B AGENCY NAME: The Arc of Story County PROGRAM NAME: Teen and Young Adult Respite Retreats ASSET SERVICE CODE: Respite Care 3.2f 1. Need for Service: What community problem is the service addressing? Parents who have teenage and young adult children with developmental disabilities living at home often do not have the same opportunities for non-work (free time) activities as do their peers. Parents cannot leave their “children” unattended and often times require specialized care arrangements. Parents report disappointment that their children do not have the opportunity to do young adult type activities. How do you determine community need? Initially, families came to The Arc expressing a need for this service. In the fall of 2003, we did a survey of families and asked if they needed this service, and the results were overwhelmingly positive. In fact, we found that there is a need to expand to serve families who have children ages 25+ who are living at home. Currently, our program is restricted by ASSET to provide for children ages 13 – 24. We are considering a program expansion for the next ASSET funding cycle to include older “children” at home. Who is being served? Teens and young adults who have mental retardation and related developmental disabilities who live at home with their parents. These individuals have the potential to live, work and socialize in our community as adults. Coordinating efforts The Arc is the only organization providing group respite in a community setting for this age and disability level. Other opportunities for respite exist for families with a variety of providers in other formats. The providers of services for persons with disabilities in our county work cooperatively and often families use multiple providers. Choice is important. Why is it appropriate to use ASSET funds for this service? The funds provide an essential service to families. It benefits both the parents and the child with quality care, a needed break from the on-going care needs associated with raising a child with a disability, and reduces social isolation for both. It may contribute to the decision of the family to be able to continue caring for their child within the home environment instead of much costlier out of home placement. While some families can access respite thru the Medicaid Waiver program, others do not qualify due to the Medicaid regulations. ASSET funding provides a way for them to get respite on an on- going basis. It also supplements Medicaid respite for families who have higher needs. 2. Service availability How do you determine who needs this service? Families request the service for their child. We have an intake process to determine who qualifies (age, disability, level of care required ) Considering the local of the service, how are transportation and accessibility addressed? We provide the respite retreats in community environments – renting hotel rooms and lodges at camps. In addition, we are able to use space at the Heartland Senior Services to do group activities in doors. We are out and about in the community participating in skill building and age appropriate activities. Transportation during the respite is provided by using staff vehicles and CyRide when appropriate. Parents are responsible for bring their child to and from the retreat. We are limited to where we can go by the transportation options or funding to pay for vehicle rental or staff mileage reimbursement.
  2. 2. 3. Program Emphasis The respite retreats for teens and young adults helps parents get a break from the on- going care needs of their child. Marriages are nurtured. Errands are completed. Time is spent with other siblings. For some families this enables them to keep their child at home longer – avoiding out of home placement before it is their choice to do so. For the teens and young adults, they have time with peers, develop social skills, gain community living skills necessary for future independent living, get a break from Mom and Dad and learn to interact with other adults, increase decision making skills, and generally get to feel more independent. 4. Responsiveness to need and planning How is the agency responsive to changing community needs, client needs and advances in the area of service? The nature of our services affords us the opportunity for building close relationships with the families and individuals we serve. We make personal contacts and do formal and informal surveys. The disability organizations keep in close contact with each other thru the Human Services Council, the Community Network group, the Transition Advisory Council, a few task force groups. The Arc staff is routinely in contact with staff at DHS, Story County Community Services, Mainstream Living, ChildServe, LSI, The Community Life Program, Friendship Ark to discuss particular client needs, community needs and general collaboration. We all benefit from the very cooperative nature that has been developed here in Story County. We learn from each other, share resources, and work together to continue to improve services for persons with developmental disabilities here in Story County. 5. Board of Directors involvement The Board of Directors for The Arc is very active. Over 50% of the members are parents or family members of an individual with a disability. The board sets policy, plans for the future, gives advice and encouragement to the staff, assists with fundraising, volunteers time to The Arc’s activities outside of the traditional role of a board member, and monitors the financial matters. 6. Agency administration The staffing at The Arc has remained stable. The Executive Director has been employed for 9 years. This year, the Ex. Dir position expanded to full time with benefits, which decreased the time for a part time Program Coordinator position. (20 hours per week down to 30 hours per month). Additional part time staff usually are ISU students who are employed for an average of 2 years before moving on. That works well for The Arc and it’s program participants. 7. Fiscal Management Other sources of Income include: Parent fees, private donations, What is the agency plan to address the economic conditions in our community? The Arc will begin to look at alternative funding sources with the most likely being the Medicaid Waiver program for ongoing support. Parent fees are unlikely to increase as parents could not afford to pay the cost on a regular basis. Donations are unreliable and difficult to get with so much competition from human service agencies. Fundraising is time consuming, unpredictable, and takes the focus away from our mission with little financial impact for the organization.
  3. 3. ATTACHMENT B AGENCY NAME: The Arc of Story County PROGRAM NAME: ACTIVE Lifestyles ASSET SERVICE CODE: Special Recreation 1.3b 1. Need for Service: What community problem is the service addressing? Children and adults with mental retardation and developmental disabilities have fewer resources available to them to participate in leisure and social activities. There is a need to reduce social isolation, increase wellness and fitness, and develop skills to participate in community based recreation activities. How do you determine community need? This is the only countywide program offered for persons with mental retardation and related developmental disabilities that specializes in adapted activities and community inclusion. There are opportunities however for people to participate in existing community recreation and social activities and we encourage people with disabilities to pursue those. Who is being served? Individuals who have mental retardation and related developmental disabilities. The age range is between 8 years and 60+. The participants may live at home or live independently with support from other human service agencies or live independently. Coordinating efforts We coordinate with all of the residential service providers, the schools, the Area Education agency, parks and recreation departments to provide information on activities, encourage participation, and support in including people with disabilities in community activities. Why is it appropriate to use ASSET funds for this service? The Story County MH/DD (Mental Health / Developmental Disabilities) dollars that are allocated through ASSET are to be used for persons with those disabilities to promote fuller inclusion into the community, prevent more expensive institutional care, and provide the services necessary for community living. The MH/DD funds are only available by applying thru ASSET. 2. Service availability How do you determine who needs this service? Anyone who meets our eligibility requirements can choose to participate. Considering the local of the service, how are transportation and accessibility addressed? We use existing community facilities for our activities. The Ames Middle School gym, Ames Parks, the pools, The Moose Lodge, Twentieth Century Lanes and occasionally churches. All facilities must be physically accessible to accommodate our participants. Transportation is provided by the residential programs, parents, and some use the public bus. The Arc occasionally provides transportation using staff owned vehicles for out of town trips and as needed in town. Transportation is a concern especially for those who live more independently. If an activity is not on a bus route or during hours when the bus doesn’t run, then they can’t go.
  4. 4. 3. Program Emphasis How does this service prevent, eliminate or reduce the problem? OR how does this service educate, rehabilitate or maintain a client? ACTIVE Lifestyles provides positive social interaction opportunities. Friendships are made, developed and nurtured. Individuals, who participate in Special Olympics, maintain and develop physical skills, fitness and receive overall health benefits. Self- esteem soars when they practice and compete in a variety of sports and leisure programs. Participants learn about a variety of leisure opportunities available to them, which can decrease social isolation and a sedentary lifestyle. 4. Responsiveness to need and planning How is the agency responsive to changing community needs, client needs and advances in the area of service? The Arc has increased the number of Special Olympic sports offered over the past 5+ years to allow for greater individual choice. We offer several levels of participation from recreational to competitive. We adapt activities to meet their physical and cognitive abilities. Staff attend training offered by Iowa Special Olympics. In addition, we offer individualized / personalized leisure and recreation opportunities when requested. As some of our participants age, we are looking at leisure opportunities that are appropriate for those slowing down and loosing physical abilities. For example: Music in Motion sign choir. 5. Board of Directors involvement The Board of Directors for The Arc is very active. Over 50% of the members are parents or family members of an individual with a disability. The board sets policy, plans for the future, gives advice and encouragement to the staff, assists with fundraising, volunteers time to The Arc’s activities outside of the traditional role of a board member, and monitors the financial matters. 6. Agency administration The staffing at The Arc has remained stable. The Executive Director has been employed for 9 years. This year, the Ex. Dir position expanded to full time with benefits, which decreased the time for a part time Program Coordinator position. (20 hours per week down to 30 hours per month). Additional part time staff usually are ISU students who are employed for an average of 2 years before moving on. That works well for The Arc and it’s program participants. 7. Fiscal Management Other sources of Income include: Participant fees, donations, fundraising What is the agency plan to address the economic conditions in our community? The MH/DD funds are based on a complicated formula from the state and funneled to the county. It is important for The Arc board members and staff to closely monitor the relationship between the state and county to insure adequate funding for services for persons with MH/DD. We need to step up the advocacy and public policy work we do to safeguard funding. We also will assess our options for fundraising and continued use of volunteers.
  5. 5. ATTACHMENT B AGENCY NAME: The Arc of Story County PROGRAM NAME: Advocacy ASSET SERVICE CODE: Advocacy 4.3b 1. Need for Service: What community problem is the service addressing? Forever, there will be people born with disabilities or through illness or accident acquire a disability. While effort is made towards prevention, we will continue to need to insure adequate, quality services. The disability system is complicated and fragmented. Public funding for services is inadequate to meet the needs. People are unaware of what is available to meet their needs. How do you determine community need? The Arc has relied on the Community Needs Assessments done by Story County Empowerment and Community Services. In addition, we have data supplied by our state and national organization about incident rates and generally accepted percentages of persons affected by mental retardation. Advocacy is directed at the community at large as well as individuals affected personally with a disability. Who is being served? Individuals of all ages who have mental retardation and related developmental disabilities. The participants may live at home or live independently with support from other human service agencies or live independently. We also advocate for family members, relatives, and the extended community. Coordinating efforts The Arc of Story County is the one entity that advocates for all persons regardless of where services are provided. We work collaboratively with all related organizations to insure that quality services are provided. As a membership based non profit organization we have the grass roots support to influence public policy and insure the rights of persons with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. Why is it appropriate to use ASSET funds for this service? Public dollars are not available for advocacy work. We rely on private donations through organized campaigns like The United Way and the Combined Federal Campaign to assist. 2. Service availability How do you determine who needs this service? This service is available to all Considering the local of the service, how are transportation and accessibility addressed? The Arc of Story County has conveniently located office space in downtown Ames. We are on the bus route and in close proximity to a variety of human service organizations and services. The Human Services Bldg is within walking distance. Our office is physically accessible and currently meets our space needs. We share meeting space with The Red Cross and when we need more room for larger meetings, several other human service agencies have offered their space to us for use. Storage is available from The Red Cross which is needed for our athletic equipment and misc. items.
  6. 6. 3. Program Emphasis How does this service prevent, eliminate or reduce the problem? OR how does this service educate, rehabilitate or maintain a client? Advocacy is at the core of everything The Arc stands for. People with mental retardation and their families join together to work for good public policy, insure the rights of people, look to the future, and be ready to support people when the need arises. We assist people in understanding the “system” and “navigating” through the disability maze. We educate our legislators, our community leaders, the people we live, learn, work and play with. Without strong advocates, there is a real possibility that services and supports for our constituents would be reduced or eliminated. 4. Responsiveness to need and planning How is the agency responsive to changing community needs, client needs and advances in the area of service? Through continued professional development, collaboration with local, state and national organizations that serve people with developmental disabilities, and one on one direct contact with families. The Arc exists because of the relationships nurtured between staff, volunteers, and the individuals affected by mental retardation and developmental disabilities. 5. Board of Directors involvement The Board of Directors for The Arc is very active. Over 50% of the members are parents or family members of an individual with a disability. The board sets policy, plans for the future, gives advice and encouragement to the staff, assists with fundraising, volunteers time to The Arc’s activities outside of the traditional role of a board member, and monitors the financial matters. 6. Agency administration The staffing at The Arc has remained stable. The Executive Director has been employed for 9 years. This year, the Ex. Dir position expanded to full time with benefits, which decreased the time for a part time Program Coordinator position. (20 hours per week down to 30 hours per month). Additional part time staff usually are ISU students who are employed for an average of 2 years before moving on. That works well for The Arc and it’s program participants. 7. Fiscal Management Other sources of Income include: Donations, fundraising. What is the agency plan to address the economic conditions in our community? Keep fighting the fight. We will look at additional philanthropic grants to continue our work. We actively support the United Way Campaign by providing speakers for testimonials, radio spots, and urging people to contribute generously. If we can do more to insure the success of the United Way campaigns we will do that.
  7. 7. TABLE OF ORGANIZATION THE ARC OF STORY COUNTY BOARD OF DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR PROGRAM COORDINATOR Recreation Respite Care Assistants Providers

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