Qualitative Research: Phenomenology

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Qualitative Research: Phenomenology

  1. 1. METHODS OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH: PHENOMENOLOGICAL RESEARCH Charisse Gennevieve Ballad Ralph Julius Bawalan
  2. 2. AT A GLANCEWhereas a narrative study reports the life of a single individual, a phenomenological study describes the meaning of several individuals of their lived experience.
  3. 3. PHENOMENOLOGICAL RESEARCH• Identification of a shared experience• Attempt to locate universal nature of an experience• Attempt to identify shared experience among various individuals experiencing shared phenomena• Attempt to locate essence of an experience• What was experienced and How he/she experienced it.
  4. 4. PHENOMENOLOGY• “The study of the lived experiences of persons”• Experience is a conscious process• The “development of [interpretations] of the essences of these experiences
  5. 5. WHY DO IPA? • IPA considers phenomenological inquiry as an INTERPRETATIVE process • IPA is concerned with trying to UNDERSTAND what it is like from the point of view of the participants • PARTICIPANT: trying to make sense of their personal and social world • RESEARCHER: trying to make sense of the participant
  6. 6. METHODS • Purposive sampling (homogenous sample) • Research Question • Involve issues and experiences of considerable significance to the participant/s • Sample/Recruitment of Participants • Snowball sampling • Data Collection • Semi-structured, one-on-one interviews
  7. 7. METHODS
  8. 8. ANALYSIS • “Iterative, complex, and creative” • In practice, the analysis for phenomenological studies is fluid, iterative, and multi - directional. • “Stages” of Analysis: • Initial • Second • Third • Final
  9. 9. INITIAL STAGE • Read the whole transcript more than once • Record some observations and reflections about the interview experience in a separate reflexive notebook • Textual Analysis
  10. 10. INITIAL STAGE
  11. 11. INITIAL STAGE
  12. 12. SECOND STAGE • Return to the transcript to transform the initial notes into emerging themes • Main task: To formulate concise phrases that contain enough particularity to remain grounded in the text and enough abstraction to offer conceptual understanding
  13. 13. SECOND STAGE
  14. 14. SECOND STAGE
  15. 15. THIRD STEP• examining the emerging themes and clustering them together according to conceptual similarities.• The task at this stage is to look for patterns in the emerging themes and produce a structure that will be helpful in highlighting converging ideas.
  16. 16. FINAL STEP• In the final stage a table of themes is produced. The table shows the structure of major themes and sub-themes. An illustrative data extract or quote is presented alongside each theme, followed by the line number, so that it is possible to check the context of the extract in the transcript.
  17. 17. MOVING ON• The next step in projects involving more than one participant consists of moving to the next case and repeating the process for each participant.• Inevitably the analysis of the first case will influence further analysis.• In following the steps rigorously for each case separately, it is important to keep an open mind to allow new themes to emerge from each case..• Once all transcripts have been analysed and a table of themes has been constructed for each, a final table of themes is constructed for the study as a whole• In the process of constructing the final table, the tables of themes for each participant are reviewed and, if necessary, amended and checked again with the transcript.
  18. 18. NARRATIVE• It is sensible to take the superordinate themes one by one and write them up in that order. The writing style reflects the IPA approach to analysis, beginning with a close reading grounded in participants‟ accounts before moving towards a more interpretative level.• The narrative account should aim to be persuasive and to mix extracts from participants‟ own words with interpretative comments.• In this way it is possible to retain some of the „voice‟ of the participant and at the same time to enable the reader to assess the pertinence of the interpretations.
  19. 19. PRESENTING THE RESEARCH• The final report starts with an introduction that describes what the project is about and outlines the rationale for the project. The introduction also explains the rationale for using IPA and describes the stages in the process• Following the introduction, in IPA studies the „literature review‟ is quite short as the primary research questions are phenomenological and the process is inductive rather than theory-driven.• It is recognised that during the analysis issues may arise that were not anticipated at the outset. These will be picked up at a later stage by engaging with literature in the „Discussion‟ section.
  20. 20. PRESENTING THE RESEARCH• In a typical IPA study the next section provides a step-by-step guide to the actual method used in the research, including details of participants, data collection method and the process of analysis.• This is followed by presentation of the analysis in narrative form which includes detailed extracts from participants‟ accounts. In the final section, the discussion shifts the focus towards a wider context of a dialogue with existing literature, complementing, illuminating or problematising other perspectives in the literature.• The reader is then able to engage in the process of considering the study in relation to their professional and personal experience as well as the relevant literature. The discussion and conclusion may point towards applications in practice and provide suggestions for further research.
  21. 21. IN SUMMARY• 1. Identification of a “common or shared experience of a phenomenon” • a. Desire to have a better understanding of the phenomena, more than a narrative account of one‟s experience. • • Researcher hopes to better understand “Z” more than subjects a,b,c,d interpretation of Z. • • Their interpretation of Z is necessary for a better understanding of the essence of Z.• 2. The Phenomena is identified• 3. Bracket researcher bias and interpretation• 4. Data Collection:
  22. 22. PROCEDURAL STEPS• Best sample sizes range from 5-25 participants• 5. Questioning: • a. Two Essential Research Questions: • • “What have you experienced in terms of the phenomena?” • • “What contexts or situations have typically influenced or affected your experience of the phenomenon?” • b. Best Practices in Questioning: • 1. Questions should draw from a common theme • 2. Questions should urge participants to identify the affect the phenomenon had on their lived experiences. • 3. Questions should seek to identify the importance of interpreting the experience in a unique way
  23. 23. PROCEDURAL STEPS• 6. Data Analysis: • a. Horizonalization: attempt to understand participant experience. • b. Clusters of Meaning: Unification of interpretations into themes.• 7. Unified Descriptive Account: • a. Unification of textural descriptions into one description • b. Unification of structural descriptions into one description• 8. Presentation of the Invariant Structure: • a. Combination of unified textural and structural descriptions.

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