Learner Centered Environments

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Learner Centered Environments In distance education

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  • What is in this title?Distance education is not a new term – it has its roots in the postal education / correspondence education where course materials / lessons were sent out to the student on a weekly basis. The goal of this type of education has always been clear - find tools/ ways to communicate with the student who is unable to attend regular school/ university. Distance education evolved over time into remote / off –site / online education . The inherent nature of remote education or learning is to focus on the learner. Hence it has always been a learner centered education. Instructional design centered around the learner. Postal Mail, radio, television have all been used to promote better delivery of content. Computers and internet together contribute to the innovations and promises of the distance education. The force of innovations in this area could transform certain areas of learning and course delivery.
  • Learner Centered Environments

    1. 1. Learner Centered Environments In Distance Education<br />By <br />RajiGogulapati<br />
    2. 2. Topics <br /><ul><li>Learner Centered Environments – An Overview
    3. 3. Target Learner
    4. 4. Management / Administration
    5. 5. Technologies
    6. 6. Business of Education
    7. 7. Evidence
    8. 8. Conclusions </li></ul>Raji Gogulapati<br />2<br />
    9. 9. Learner Centered Environments (LCE) <br />An Overview <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />3<br />
    10. 10. LCEs Shift Focus To Learning & Learner<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />4<br />
    11. 11. e-Learning Quote <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />“E-Learning is the continuous assimilation of knowledge and skills by adults stimulated by synchronous and asynchronous learning events – and sometimes Knowledge Management outputs – which are authored, delivered, engaged with, supported and administered using Internet technologies” Source: Chapter 1, E-Learning Strategies, How to get implementation and delivery right first time, by Don Morrison, Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.,<br />5<br />
    12. 12. Towards An Operating Model For LCE & e-Learning <br />From Traditional Settings <br />To Learner Centered Settings <br />7<br />
    13. 13. Target Learner <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />7<br />
    14. 14. Raji Gogulapati<br />8<br />
    15. 15. Management & Administration<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />9<br />
    16. 16. Glimpses Into Course Management<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />10<br />
    17. 17. Technologies <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />11<br />
    18. 18. Learning System Technologies In Practice<br /><ul><li>e-Learning Systems Applications
    19. 19. eBooks Publishers
    20. 20. Computer Systems Vendors
    21. 21. Alliances & Consortiums, Infomediary Websites
    22. 22. Search Engines collaboration</li></ul>Raji Gogulapati<br />12<br />
    23. 23. E-Learning System Application - Desirables<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />13<br />
    24. 24. Technology’s Role<br /><ul><li>Medium For Knowledge e-source
    25. 25. Tool For - Administration - Collaboration - Communication- Learner Engagement- Evaluation and Feedback
    26. 26. Effective in Improved learning outcomes</li></ul>14<br />
    27. 27. e-sources of knowledge in practice<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />15<br />
    28. 28. Technology Participants<br />16<br />
    29. 29. Learning Networks In Practice <br />First generation (materials online, faculty webpage, email)<br />Second generation (thread based discussion forums, online evaluation & feedback, access to web materials, facilitation, e-learning course management systems) <br />Open Source (Moodle, Sakai)<br />Social Software & e-learning (role of Google, YouTube, MySpace, Facebook, blogs)<br />More to come! <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />17<br />
    30. 30. Prototype With Moodle<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />18<br />
    31. 31. Consortiums, Alliances <br />IBM works closely with several consortia and companies that focus on open computing<br />The Kuali Project (http://kuali.org/)<br />The Sakai Project (http://sakaiproject.org/)<br />Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia)<br />Moodle (http://moodle.org/)<br />The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) Open Technologies Partnership (http://www.cosn.org/about/press/030706.cfm)<br />The rSmart Group (www.rsmart.com)<br />Source: www.ibm.com, Open Technologies glossary<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />19<br />
    32. 32. Consortiums, Alliances <br /><ul><li>A consortium of Institutions and Organizations Committed to Quality Online Educationhttp://www.sloan-c.org/
    33. 33. Microsoft U S Partners In Learning http://www.microsoft.com/Education/PiLUS.mspx
    34. 34. http://www-03.ibm.com/industries/education/index.jsp</li></ul>Raji Gogulapati<br />20<br />
    35. 35. Business Of Education <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />21<br />
    36. 36. Business of education<br /><ul><li>Demand Drivers
    37. 37. Competition
    38. 38. Value Chain
    39. 39. Revenue Models </li></ul>Raji Gogulapati<br />22<br />
    40. 40. Demand Drivers <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />23<br />
    41. 41. Demand Drivers <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />24<br />
    42. 42. Raji Gogulapati<br />25<br />Competition <br />Universities <br />Infrastructure Integrators <br />Consulting Services<br />Work place Training <br />Content providers <br />
    43. 43. Value Chain:source: Retrieved and adapted from http://www.bctechnology.com/statics/bcelearning.swf <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />26<br />
    44. 44. Revenue Models<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />27<br />
    45. 45. Evidence <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />28<br />
    46. 46. Key Statistics for higher education<br />“The evidence: Online enrollments have continued to grow at rates far in excess of the total higher education student population, with the most recent data demonstrating no signs of slowing.<br />Over 3.9 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2007 term; a 12 percent increase over the number reported the previous year. <br />The 12.9 percent growth rate for online enrollments far exceeds the 1.2 percent growth of the overall higher education student population. <br />Over twenty percent of all U.S. higher education students were taking at least one online course in the fall of 2007”<br />http://www.sloan-c.org/publications/survey/index.asp<br />Source:Staying the Course: Online Education in the United States, 2008 by Sloan-C The complete survey report, “Staying the Course: Online Education in the United States, 2008” is available <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />29<br />
    47. 47. Key Statistics for higher education<br />“Almost 3.5 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2006 term; a nearly 10 percent increase over the number reported the previous year. <br />The 9.7 percent growth rate for online enrollments far exceeds the 1.5 percent growth of the overall higher education student population. <br />Nearly twenty percent of all U.S. higher education students were taking at least one online course in the fall of 2006”Source: Online Nation: Five Years of Growth in Online Learningrepresents the fifth annual report on the state of online learning in U.S. higher education<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />30<br />
    48. 48. Key statistics – contd. <br />“Two-year associate’s institutions have the highest growth rates and account for over one-half of all online enrollments for the last five years. <br />Baccalaureate institutions began the period with the fewest online enrollments and have had the lowest rates of growth.”Source: Online Nation: Five Years of Growth in Online Learningrepresents the fifth annual report on the state of online learning in U.S. higher education<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />31<br />
    49. 49. Key statistics – (MIT Open courseware) <br />Site Statistics<br />67 million visits by 48 million visitors from virtually every country.<br />OCW is accessed by a broadly international population of educators and learners.<br />MIT OpenCourseWare averages 1 million visits each month; translations receive 500,000 more.<br />Visitors from all over the world use OpenCourseWare:Our audience is divided among students, educators, and self-learners:<br />MIT OpenCourseWare is being successfully used for a wide range of purposes.Source: http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/web/about/stats/index.htm<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />32<br />
    50. 50. References<br />1. Chapter 5, Disruptive Diplomas in the book Seeing what ‘s next : Using the theories of innovation to predict industry change authored by Clayton M. Christensen (author of the Innovator’s dilemma and the Innovator’s solution), Scott D. Anthony, Erik A. Roth (2004) - Harvard Business School Press.The chapter on Disruptive Diplomas identifies several types of consumers of education.It exposes some of the drawbacks and misconceptions about viewing distance learning (e-learning) as just another vehicle to provide the same class-room based education. Analyzing the needs of target audience is as important as the course design for e-learning to be successful is the essence of this chapter.<br />2. Distance Education, Vol. 27, No. 2, August 2006, pp. 139 -153 Distance Education Trends: Integrating new technologies to foster student interaction and collaboration YoanyBeldarrain Florida Virtual School, USA<br />3. Journal of Information Technology Education Volume 6, 2007,Web-Based Learning Environment: A Theory-Based Design Process forDevelopment and EvaluationChang S. Nam University of Arkansas Fayetteville, AR, USATonya L. Smith-Jackson Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA, USA<br />4. Several blogs focusing on e-learning technologies.http://mivanova.blogspot.com/<br />www.learningcircuits.org<br />http://www.tutorvista.com/<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />33<br />
    51. 51. References contd. <br />www.sric-bi.combi.com/LoD/summaries/EvolvBizModelsSum.pdf<br />http://www.sloan-c.org/publications/survey/index.asp<br />http://www.google.com/Top/Reference/Education/Distance_Learning/Online_Teaching_and_Learning/E-learning_Companies/<br />sites.google.com<br />http://www.elearninglearning.com/corporate-learning <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />34<br />
    52. 52. E-Learning Once Again - Learner Perspectives <br />Raji Gogulapati<br />35<br />Convenience<br />Readiness<br />Learner Profiles <br />Control <br />Life & Learning<br />Choices<br />Course Design<br />Level of Learning <br />Services<br />Technologies <br />Expectations<br />
    53. 53. Trends & Possibilities<br />Continuous evolution <br />Personal Learning Environment<br />Customization, NOT standardization <br />User interfaces & interactions<br />Message from games in learning <br />Learning on the Semantic Web<br />Raji Gogulapati<br />36<br />
    54. 54. Challenges <br /><ul><li> Adoption
    55. 55. Infrastructure
    56. 56. Teams for Project management & Support
    57. 57. Systems Integration
    58. 58. Vendor Selection
    59. 59. Security
    60. 60. Feasibility! </li></ul>Raji Gogulapati<br />37<br />
    61. 61. Conclusions <br />Requires <br /><ul><li> “Learning Systems” Thinking
    62. 62. Envisioning training/ educational institute as an Organization delivering products suitable for it’s customers/ consumers wants and needs
    63. 63. Openness to new approaches
    64. 64. Understanding Key Differentiators
    65. 65. Questioning The Suitability</li></ul>Raji Gogulapati<br />38<br />

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