Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Cinnovation part 1 of 8 Chinese Innovation : How Chinese Innovators are Changing the World

512 views

Published on

Cinnovation part 1 of 8 Chinese Innovation : How Chinese Innovators are Changing the World

  • Awesome slide...GET FUNDING NOW...Instantly send your startups pitchdeck to over 5700 of VC's and Angel's with just 1 click. Visit: Angelvisioninvestors.com
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Cinnovation part 1 of 8 Chinese Innovation : How Chinese Innovators are Changing the World

  1. 1. Cinnovation: How Chinese Inventors are Changing the World Innovation in China—mystery or mastery?
  2. 2. Innovation is the core of our national development strategy. President Hu Jintao, 2007
  3. 3. “The world's factory” is no longer the default setting for development. This book's main thesis is that China will soon become the world's innovator, moving beyond being the world's factory and ultimately becoming the world's leader.
  4. 4. This book provides a primer on what some of China's best innovative business leaders have in common and showcases examples for China in its transition from “Made in China” to “Innovated in China.”
  5. 5. Chapter1 :Welcome to theWorld of Chinnovation
  6. 6. Welcome to the World of Chinnovation It is through this process of innovation under uncertainty that unbelievable fortunes are made in China's march toward global supremacy. Chinnovation takes readers into this world of translating ideas into globally competitive companies. For those who want to innovate like the best, Chinnovation distills key points from real-life innovation experiences, revealing the unique strategies, the implementation mechanisms, and the measurements the best innovators use.
  7. 7. Welcome to the World of Chinnovation It discusses some of the best and worst experiences, the pitfalls inevitably encountered when risks are taken, and the ways individuals can use the lessons they've learned. Impossible? Since its economic reform began in 1978, China has gone from a poor, developing country to the second-largest economy in the world. Yet when it comes to science and technology, most people have the impression (not helped by CNN images) that China is a country with massive steelworks and vast smoking factories.
  8. 8. Welcome to the World of Chinnovation Very quietly, China has become the world's second-largest producer of scientific knowledge, surpassed only by the United States, a status it has achieved at an awe-inspiring rate. If its progress continues on its current trajectory, China will overtake the United States before 2020. There are quality concerns. In university education, only slightly over 10 percent of faculty members have PhDs, and only 40 percent have any postgraduate degree. In respect of R&D personnel, McKinsey Global Institute has found that only 10 percent of China's young white-collar workers are fit for employment at multinational corporations.
  9. 9. Welcome to the World of Chinnovation Of total R&D personnel, less than 4 percent have PhDs, and only 10 percent have master's degrees. A 2007 McKinsey survey also indicated that poor enforcement of commercial laws and intellectual property (IP) protections continue to worry executives in China.
  10. 10. Welcome to the World of Chinnovation Capitalists and enterprises build dynamic economies and innovation. However, this fundamentally rests on the innovators and entrepreneurs who assume and accept the benefits and risks of an initiative.
  11. 11. Common denominators that define the innovator's playbook The best entrepreneurial innovators Nurture a childlike mind Are playful, open-minded, and unrestrained by the inner voice of reason, collective cynicism, or fear of failure. Also aspire to be at the forefront, as the proverb says, preferring to be the head of the rooster rather than the tail of an ox.
  12. 12. Common denominators that define the innovator's playbook But they maintain a dose of sensibility in managing innovation teams, akin to parents teaching their children to ride a bicycle. That is, they teach, support, and help, but what is most important is that they learn when to let go and maintain fine balance. They refrain from giving their staff a crutch to rely upon, which would stifle the innovation Process. These entrepreneurial innovators often accelerate the innovation process by ensuring that the organization reaches “escape velocity,” thereby unleashing its energy and transforming latent ideas to create new products and services.
  13. 13. Basic Overview of Terms and Concepts: Innovation 101
  14. 14. Disruptive innovation A process by which a product or service sprouts as a simple application at the bottom of a market and then relentlessly moves upmarket, eventually displacing established competitors
  15. 15. Value Innovation, or Blue Ocean Strategy The central thesis of blue ocean strategy is that blue ocean is created when a company achieves value innovation that creates value simultaneously for both the buyer and the company. This is often achieved at simultaneous pursuit of differentiation and low cost.
  16. 16. Trinity of Innovation The basic constituents of innovation are ideas, people, and money. In Silicon Valley, innovative start-ups form when an entrepreneur (human capital) with an idea (intellectual capital) approaches a venture capitalist (financial capital).
  17. 17. Scope Innovations Are primarily associated with supply-side changes, usually resulting in a better, cheaper, or faster product, typically enabled by technology. This usually includes cost-innovation the practice of competing in niche markets and customizing products at mass market low prices. This can also include demand-side changes, such as increasing or decreasing the scope of marketing and distribution of different types of products.
  18. 18. Industrial Evolution Radical series of innovations that redefine the borders of an industry. The changes may not be noticeable initially, but beyond a certain tipping point, accelerates rapidly This typically results in large-scale changes in the industry world view that are eventually implemented and accepted by the majority—as past norms and assumptions become obsolete. Examples include the DVD replacing VCR
  19. 19. Crowdsourcing Is a distributed problem-solving and production mechanism which many of the innovators featured here use, and is simply the act of outsourcing tasks to a large group of people or community (a crowd) through an open call. First coined by Jeff Howe, the term crowdsourcing stems largely from the fact that technological advances have allowed organizations to tap into the global world of ideas, helping organizations work through a rapid design process
  20. 20. Service Innovation A new or significantly improved service concept that is taken into practice. It can be, for example, a new customer interaction channel, a distribution system, or a technological concept—or a combination of them
  21. 21. The Matrix of Technological and Business Model Innovation The scope innovator makes a better, cheaper, faster product and specializes in making a “new” product.
  22. 22. The Matrix of Technological and Business Model Innovation The cross-disciplinary innovator cross-pollinates disciplines and routinely plugs in business models from other fields and enhances the whole process, usually in the form of service innovation or business model innovation.
  23. 23. The Matrix of Technological and Business Model Innovation The industrial evolutionist looks for frontiers, often shifting the tectonic plates of an entire industry.
  24. 24. The Matrix of Technological and Business Model Innovation The non-innovator is typically risk- averse and looks around to see how others are doing things before adopting anything new
  25. 25. The Matrix of Technological and Business Model Innovation Cross-disciplinary innovators and scope innovators can be “seekers,” continually seeking to improve without knowing exactly what they are looking for, or “finders”— people who typically know what they want and make sure they find it
  26. 26. However, this description is incomplete. The key question is whether the innovation creates value. Are the customers happy? Will they refer other customers to you?
  27. 27. Innovation Stack The third dimension comes in the form of value to the end customer and user
  28. 28. Innovation Stack For the scope innovators, making a better, cheaper, faster new product matters only if it fulfills an unmet customer need.
  29. 29. Innovation Stack The cross-disciplinary innovators, who learn lessons from other industries and readapt their business model, have to deliver overall greater value to the customers. Do they deliver their services in a more “usefully innovative” manner?
  30. 30. Innovation Stack The industrial evolutionists, who look to shift the tectonic plates of an entire industry, must find the right permutation of technological and business model innovation such that the end product makes sense in terms of higher benefits and lower cost for the customer.
  31. 31. So What Is Chinnovation Chinnovation is applying changes in technology and business strategy to have new and better ways to create value for both the customer and the corporation. In China, this is often characterized by eightdistinctive characteristics (termed the “Eight Rs of Chinnovation”)
  32. 32. Eight Rs of Chinnovation •Revenue •Rapidity •Requirements •Reproduction •Rivals •Restrictions •Remixing •Raw Materials
  33. 33. Revenue Compared to their Western counterparts, Chinese innovators are laser-focused on revenues. If one compares Facebook to QQ (China's largest social networking service), Facebook has 300 million active users compared to QQ's 450 million users. Facebook was only recently profitable while QQ has a $2 billion revenue and $1 billion profit
  34. 34. Rapidity Chinese innovators move fast. One of the innovators I interviewed took only 18 months between starting a company and listing it on NASDAQ. Rapidity also refers to the rapid prototyping process, where Chinese innovators are lauded for engaging with customers closely to develop products and sales processesquickly in a series of iterations.
  35. 35. Requirements Requirements are whatever the customers say they are. Chinese innovators are highly localized and sensitive to the needs of their customers, as they pay close attention to people struggling with solutions available in China. By tapping China's cost advantage in niche markets to increase their process flexibility, China's innovators are fulfilling the requirements of their customers at rock-bottom prices
  36. 36. Reproduction One Facebook in the U.S. will spawn 20 copycats in China overnight. There is a fine line between innovation and low-value reproduction. On the other hand, there's a lot of pressure to copy.
  37. 37. Rivals China is good or bad because everyone is an entrepreneur. Spurred by rivals, Chinese companies have a constant stimulus to innovate. Innovators who do not innovate after copying usually do not survive. China always has a handful of local copycats appearing within weeks of a company being featured on prominent Western technology magazines.
  38. 38. Restrictions Restrictions have spurred entrepreneurship and innovation. The banning of Facebook in China has resulted in at least half a dozen Facebook clones mushrooming there. Frank Levinson, a successful entrepreneur who founded Finisar (a NASDAQ-listed company in the fiber-optic subsystems and components sector), explains that resource limitations can stimulate creative thinking
  39. 39. Remixing Breakthrough ideas are often less about the purposeful act of inventing new things than about the combination of the best ideas across sectors and geographies. Theme parks and shopping may seem to have little in common, but a supermarket in China uses roller coaster–style cars to take shoppers through the aisles. When rural Chinese complained that rats and mice were getting into their refrigerators, Haier remixed different features to come up with a rodent-proof fridge featuring metal plates over holes in the mechanism and thicker, bite-proof wiring.
  40. 40. Raw Materials China has plenty of traditional—tangible—raw materials. It also has plenty of intangible raw materials—the human, intellectual, and financial capital to put those tangible materials to use.
  41. 41. Human Capital: Density of Entrepreneurs According to the 2009 GEM Report, from 2004 through 2009, China had the highest rate of high-expectation entrepreneurship of any country covered by the study. More than 4 percent of the Chinese working-age population is engaging in high- growth-expectation entrepreneurship. In the United States, that share is less than 1.5 percent.
  42. 42. Intellectual Capital: Density of Science and Technology PhDs. The Chinese Academy of Sciences alone produces close to 100,000 PhDs per year. This flood has translated to innovative companies grounded on strong intellectual property.
  43. 43. Intellectual Capital: Density of Science and Technology PhDs. •For example, Wuxi Pharma Tech is a leading low-cost, high-quality contract chemistry services company. •It can offer full-time equivalent (FTE) programs that assign scientists to work on a client's project for a defined period in fields including drug discovery and development. •FTE programs are so popular that they make up the majority of Wuxi's revenue. •The high quality of the services that the company provides enabled it to reach revenues of $21million within four years of its formation.
  44. 44. Financial Capital: Density of Venture Capital and Purchasing Power •In 2009, there were more than 420 venture investments in China, with a combined investment amount of $2.7billion. •Consumer power is escalating. •The total retail sales of consumer goods reached RMB12 trillion in 2009 and is expected to hit RMB15 trillion (about $2.25 trillion) in 2010
  45. 45. The Eight Rs summarize the most common traits of Chinese innovators. Most companies have a selection of the Rs—it is rare to see all eight in one company—but the combination adds up to Chinnovation.

×