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Narrative research design

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Narrative research design

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Narrative research design

  1. 1. Made by Rahila Khan SBK Women’sUniversity
  2. 2. Contents What is Narrative Research? Why Narrative Research is done? How Narrative Research developed? Types of Narrative Research. Key characteristics of Narrative Research. Steps of Narrative Research. Evaluating Narrative Research Sample of a Narrative research Design Possible concerns and solutions.
  3. 3.  “ to narrate”  “ to tell a story in detail”
  4. 4.  researchers describe the lives of individuals,  collects stories about people’s lives,  write narratives of individual experiences . ( Connelly & Clandinin, 1990 ).
  5. 5.  Its done to get specific insights.  To help reduce a commonly held perception by practitioners.  To make the participants feel that sharing their stories is important and its heard.
  6. 6.  The narrative turn embraces all of the human sciences. “Riessman (1993)”  First overview of narrative research in education was given by “D. Jean Clandinin and Micheal Connelly (1990)” “stories of experiences and narrative inquiry”
  7. 7.  Autobiography  Biography  Personal accounts  Personal narratives  Narrative interviews  Personal documents  Documents of life  Life stories and histories  Popular memories  Ethno histories  Ethno biographies  Ethno psychologies
  8. 8.  Individual experiences  Chronology of the experiences  Collecting individual stories  Restorying  Coding for themes  Context or setting  Collaboration with participants
  9. 9.  Single individual  exploring the experiences of that individual
  10. 10.  Researcher analyzes and writes about an individual life using a time sequence or chronology of events  Researcher orders these events in a way that makes sense to a reader
  11. 11.  Stories have a beginning, middle, and end.  Like a novel, stories have time, place, plot, and scene.  Involve a conflict, or struggle; a protagonist or character; and a sequence with implied causality (a plot) during which the predicament is resolved in some fashion  Varied sources of data comprise the data base
  12. 12. researcher gathers stories and analyzes them for elements of the story. researcher rewrites the story to place it in a chronological sequence. restorying provides a causal link among ideas. information would include interaction, continuity, and situation
  13. 13.  Themes provide the complexity of the story  Themes add depth to the insight about understanding an individual’s experiences  Themes can be incorporated into the passage retelling the individual’s experience or as a separate section of the study
  14. 14. includes the people involved in the story includes the physical setting setting may be described before events or actions, or can be woven throughout the study
  15. 15.  Inquirer actively involves the participant in the inquiry as it unfolds .
  16. 16.  Keeps the focus on a single individual.  Reports the life experiences of individuals as told through their stories.  Restories the individual’s stories and tells the story using a chronology with a beginning, middle, and end.  Describes in some details settings of the story.  Reports themes that emerge out of the story.  Closely collaborates with the participant engages them to check and examinne the evolving story frequently and to see if it accurately reflects the individual’s experiences.
  17. 17. This study was inspired by an interest in the stories that young refugee children tell about their early experiences in an American school. This article presents a narrative inquiry into the stories and artwork of three early childhood students, Allison , Cindy and Aurora ,along with the narratives of their families, all Karen refugees from Myanmar. Through the themes presented in the stories collected, kids revealed strategies that they used in bridging home and school and in building friendships in their classroom. Importantly, viewing the children’s narratives through the stories of their families created a more holistic view of what the children experienced during the during periods of cultural dissonance. Objectives As a greater number of children and families are finding refuge in new communities across the globe, it is essential for educators to understand how refugees of all ages are making meaning of their experiences and provide them with opportunities to tell their stories.  These can teach us how to support children’s and families’ adaptation into a new community,  how to foster smooth transitions,  how to adapt our classrooms to provide students with the best educational experiences possible.
  18. 18.  Story authenticity? (Faking the data possible)  Distortion of data? (self reported information)  Is the story real? ( horrific or raw to recall)  The collection of multiple field texts,  The triangulation of data,  member checking.

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