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The median top 500 ecommerce home page takes 10
seconds to load. In spring 2012, the median page loade...
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Radware State of the Union: Page Speed & Web Performance -- Spring 2014 Infographic

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We tested the load times of the top 500 retails sites and found that the median page takes 10 seconds to load – a 47% slowdown in just two years. The culprit? A combination of page bloat, missed opportunities, and site owners straggling with web performance best practices.

Why should you care? The majority of online shoppers will abandon a page after 3 seconds. Just a few seconds can make all the difference and significantly affect conversions, customer satisfaction and revenue.

Read the State of the Union: Ecommerce Page Speed & Web Performance report http://www.radware.com/spring-sotu2014/ and discover new optimization tips to cure performance pains and deliver faster pages.

Published in: Technology, Design

Radware State of the Union: Page Speed & Web Performance -- Spring 2014 Infographic

  1. 1. 3s 2s 1s 5.4smedian The median top 500 ecommerce home page takes 10 seconds to load. In spring 2012, the median page loaded in 6.8 seconds. This represents a 47% slowdown in just two years. Even worse, 10% of pages took 20 seconds or longer to load. This means that a visitor spends 5.4 seconds waiting for the page’s primary content to appear and become interactive. Most online shoppers report that they will abandon a page that takes longer than 3 seconds to load. PAGE SPEED & WEB PERFORMANCE STATE OF THE UNION | SPRING 2014 We tested the load times of the most popular retail web sites and found that the median page takes 5.4 seconds to become usable and 10 seconds to load. The culprit? Pages that reach up to 13 MB in size and fail to follow web performance best practices. THE MEDIAN PAGE TAKES 10 SECONDS TO LOAD. THE MEDIAN PAGE TAKES 5.4S TO BECOME USABLE. RETAIL LEADERS PERFORMED WORSE THAN THE TOP 500. HOW FAST ARE THE WORLD’S TOP SHOPPING SITES? SPRING 2012 FALL 2012 6.8s 7.4s 47% SLOWDOWN IN JUST 2 YEARS LOAD TIME (seconds) SPRING 2013 FALL 2013 SPRING 2014 7.5s 8.6s 10.0s 6 7 8 9 10 Looking at the top 100 sites, the median site took 10.7 seconds to load, compared to 6.6 seconds in spring 2012. Spring 2014 - 10.7s Fall 2013 - 8.7s Spring 2013 - 8.2s Fall 2012 - 7.1s Spring 2012 - 6.6s This represents a 62% slowdown in two years. 1.3s 1.7s 1.8s 2.0s 2.0s 2.0s 2.1s 2.3s 2.5s 2.7s 2.7s 2.9s 3.0s Abebooks.com BHPhotovideo.com CDUniverse Barnesandnoble.com Nordstrom.com Net-a-porter.com Amazon.com Fineartamerica.com 6pm.com Wiley.com Urbanoutfitters.com Shopbop.com Carmax.com of pages took 10 seconds or longer to become interactive. These were the only sites that became interactive in 3 seconds or less: More than three-quarters of pages did not use progressive JPEGs, a performance best practice that can improve perceived page speed. Only 8% scored an A in this area. DOWNLOAD THE FREE REPORT © 2014 Radware, Ltd. All rights reserved. | www.radware.com State of the Union: Ecommerce Page Speed & Web Performance http://www.radware.com/spring-sotu2014 seconds is the maximum threshold for a visitor’s patience. 9% 10 USING A CONTENT DELIVERY NETWORK DOESN’T ALWAYS EQUAL FASTER PAGES WHY ARE PAGES SLOWER? JPEG GIF GIF JPEG GIF JPEG No 25% Yes 75% USE A CDN 75% of the top 100 retail sites use a CDN to cache page resources, such as images, closer to end users, while 25% do not. Yet this performance best practice doesn’t correlate to faster pages. There are a number of reasons why pages have slowed down. The number one culprit is images, which account for at least half of a typical page’s total size. What’s worse, many images are not optimized to render quickly in the browser. The median page contains 99 resources and is 1510 KB in size. In other words, a typical page is 20% bigger than it was just six months ago. Median TTI for sites that don’t use a CDN 4.7seconds Median TTI for sites that use a CDN 5.7seconds 1258kilobytes 1510kilobytes FALL 2013 SPRING 2014 20% bigger than six months ago. MOST SITES FAIL TO EXPLOIT IMAGE OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES There are techniques available for optimizing images for performance, but most sites fail to fully exploit them. 34% of pages failed to compress images, while only 8% scored an A in image compression. A 8% B 14% C 20% D 15% F 34% n/a 8% JPEGs PROGRESSIVEF 76% A - 8% B - 1% C - 2% D - 2% n/a -11%

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