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What is accessibility and how you can be truly accessible

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People too often think accessibility is just about ramps and Braille. But it covers a much wider area - helping people with mental illnesses, learning difficulties, neurodevelopmental disorders - and, crucially, "normal" people! Almost every improvement you make for a particular group helps everyone outside that group as well. So many access improvements can be so easily made - from having a photo of the door of your building on your website, to help people find it, or telling people when an event ends as well as starts so they know how long they have to sit still! And when it comes to your employees, accessibility goes even further. It's not just about altering their environment so they can do their best work, it's about exploiting their unique gifts so they can truly shine.

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What is accessibility and how you can be truly accessible

  1. 1. Hello.
  2. 2. What do these people have in common? Images: © 2010 Daniel Ogren Photography, Alexander Gardner, BiblioArchives / LibraryArchives, Henry Hering, Brian Minkoff-London, Kroon, Ron / Anefo
  3. 3. What accessibility is and how you can be truly accessible (Er... what's accessibility?)
  4. 4. www.sparkleclass.com
  5. 5. Image: No Chintz I'll want cake too
  6. 6. This is what I will be talking about today: 1. Untangling disability and conditions and stuff 2. Why accessibility is important 3. What you can do to be accessible 4. Using your gifts, and those of others
  7. 7. Untangling disability and conditions and stuff
  8. 8. Why accessibility is important
  9. 9. 1. Accessibility helps everyone
  10. 10. "Any adaptations you make for us will benefit the rest of your organisation." Sara Harvey, autistic presenter
  11. 11. Study of students who used subtitles in lectures
  12. 12. Study of students who used subtitles in lectures
  13. 13. Why students used subtitles: 1. Two thirds: to help focus 2. Two thirds: to retain information 3. Half: to improve comprehension 4. A third: to improve accuracy 5. A fifth: to increase engagement
  14. 14. 2. Accessibility = equality
  15. 15. “Accessibility is a foundation not a feature.” Amy Dickens, UX designer
  16. 16. Image: Sean Kisby
  17. 17. 3. Accessibility = more £££
  18. 18. “Human, helpful, humorous and humble.” Ben Rowe, UX designer
  19. 19. “We care about you”
  20. 20. What you can do to be accessible
  21. 21. 1. Tell them what to expect
  22. 22. 2. Remember they don't have your knowledge
  23. 23. 3. Give simple, helpful information
  24. 24. 4. Use fewer words
  25. 25. 5. Listen (properly)
  26. 26. By Andwhatsnext
  27. 27. 6. Be aware that people might be hiding it
  28. 28. 7. Remember the gulf between how you create and how it's received
  29. 29. 8. Do nothing
  30. 30. Using your gifts, and those of others
  31. 31. “Fear and uncertainty cloud people’s view of the benefits that neurodiversity brings.” Wayne Deakin, executive creative director
  32. 32. “Being autistic has helped me be good at my craft and look sideways at problem-solving.” Wayne Deakin, executive creative director
  33. 33. “That ability [to be your authentic self] is an expectation in the workplace now. We never want to assume that people are just one way.” Steve Hatch, vice-president of northern Europe at Facebook and dyslexic
  34. 34. What accessibility is and how you can be truly accessible
  35. 35. Work with who you are.
  36. 36. www.sparkleclass.com 0161 4488846 rachel@sugarcat.co.uk (also don't forget about the coffee and cake)

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