Module 1 safety first ppt v. 17.03.14

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Module 1 safety first ppt v. 17.03.14

  1. 1. Module 1: Safety First
  2. 2. Unit Description • This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to implement and monitor work place health and safety (WHS) policies, procedures and work practices as part of a small work team. • This unit applies to workers who have a key role in maintaining WHS in an organisation, including duty of care for other workers. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  3. 3. Early childhood education and care • The first 5 years of a child’s life set the base for the child’s health, growth, development and happiness over the years to come. • This is why early childhood experts focus on the quality of early childhood education and care services. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  4. 4. The National Quality Framework • In January 2012 the National Quality Framework was implemented across Australia as a single reform or common policy in early childhood education. • It provides a “standard” of quality that all education and care services e.g. long day care, family day care, preschool, outside school hours care services etc. are required to attain. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  5. 5. The National Quality Framework includes: © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  6. 6. The National Quality Standard • The NQF sets minimum standards for quality, called The National Quality Standard (NQS). • The NQS has seven “Quality Areas”. • Early childhood education and care providers are assessed by ACECQA against each Quality Area and then given an overall rating. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  7. 7. NQS Quality Areas 1. Educational program and practice 2. Children’s health and safety 3. Physical environment 4. Staffing arrangements 5. Relationships with children 6. Collaborative partnerships with families and communities 7. Leadership and service management © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 More information about the National Quality Framework and National Quality Standard is available on the Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority website www.acecqa.gov.au
  8. 8. Quality Area 2: Children’s Health and Safety © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, Version Date: 7.12.13 Standard 2.1 Each child’s health is promoted Element 2.1.2 Each child’s health needs are supported Element 2.1.2 Each child’s comfort is provided for an there are appropriate opportunities to meet each child’s need for sleep, rest and relaxation Element 2.1.3 Effective hygiene practices are promoted and implemented Element 2.1.4 Steps are taken to control the spread of infectious diseases and to manage injuries and illness, in accordance with recognised guidelines Standard 2.2 Healthy eating and physical activity are embedded into the program for children Element 2.2.1 Healthy eating is promoted and food and drinks provided by the service are nutritious and appropriate for each child Element 2.2.2 Physical activity is promoted through planned and spontaneous experiences and is appropriate for each child Standard 2.3 Each child is protected Element 2.3.1 Children are adequately supervised at all times Element 2.3.2 Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause harm Element 2.3.3 Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised and implemented Element 2.3.4 Educators, coordinators and staff members are aware of their roles and responsibilities to respond to every child at risk of abuse or neglect
  9. 9. Related Sections of the National Law & National Regulations Standard/Element National Law Section and National Regulations 2.1.2, 2.3.1, 2.3.2 Section 165 Offence to inadequately supervise children 2.3.2 Section 167 Offence relating to protection of children from harm and hazards 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.2.1 Regulation 77 Health, hygiene and safe food practices 2.2.1 Regulation 78 Food and beverages 2.2.1 Regulation 79 Service providing food and beverages 2.2.1 Regulation 80 Weekly menu 2.1.2 Regulation 81 Sleep and Rest 2.3.2 Regulation 82 Tobacco, drug and alcohol free environment 2.3.2 Regulation 83 Staff members and family day care educators not to be affected by alcohol or drugs 2.3.4 Regulation 84 Awareness of child protection laws 2.1.4, 2.3.3, 2.3.4 Regulation 85 Notification injury, trauma, and illness policies and procedures © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, Version Date: 7.12.13
  10. 10. Related Sections of the National Law & National Regulations Standard/Element National Law Section and National Regulations 2.1.4, 2.3.3, 2.3.4 Regulation 86 Notifications to parent of incident, injury, trauma and illness 2.1.4, 2.3.3, 2.3.4 Regulation 87 Incident, injury, trauma and illness record 2.1.4 Regulation 88 Infectious diseases 2.1.4 Regulation 89 First Aid kits 2.1.1, 2.1.4, 2.3.2 Regulation 90 Medical conditions policy 2.1.1, 2.1.4, 2.3.2 Regulation 91 Medical conditions policy to be provided to parents 2.1.1, 2.1.4 Regulation 92 Medication record 2.1.1, 2.1.4 Regulation 93 Administration of medication 2.1.1, 2.1.4 Regulation 94 Exception to authorisation requirement – anaphylaxis or asthma emergency 2.1.1, 2.1.4 Regulation 95 Procedure for administration of medication 2.1.1, 2.1.4 Regulation 96 Self administration of medication © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, Version Date: 7.12.13
  11. 11. Related Sections of the National Law & National Regulations Standard/Element National Law Section and National Regulations 2.3.3 Regulation 97 Emergency and evacuation procedures 2.3.3 Regulation 98 Telephone or other communication equipment 2.3.2 Regulation 99 Children leaving the education and care premises 2.3.1, 2.3.2 Regulation 100 Risk assessment must be conducted before an excursion 2.3.1, 2.3.2 Regulation 101 Conduct of risk assessment for excursion 2.3.1, 2.3.2 Regulation 102 Authorisation for excursions © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, Version Date: 7.12.13
  12. 12. The Early Years Learning Framework • The Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) has been developed by the Australian and state and territory governments with input from the early childhood sector. • It is a key component of the NQF and has been incorporated in the NQS to support consistent and quality early childhood education and care across Australia. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  13. 13. The Early Years Learning Framework cont. • EYLF helps early childhood education and care providers achieve acceptable quality standards in their areas of service. • EYLF beneficiaries are also young children up to 5 years of age as they experience learning during their initial years and through their transition to school. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  14. 14. The Early Years Learning Framework cont. • The theme of EYLF is “Belonging, being and becoming” – Experiencing belonging – knowing where and with whom you belong – is integral to human existence. – Childhood is a time to “be”, to seek and make meaning of the world. – Becoming reflects the changes that occur in early years as young children learn and grow. It means learning to participate fully and actively in society. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  15. 15. What is WHS? • Work place health and safety (WHS) is concerned with protecting the safety, health and welfare of employees, visitors and clients. • WHS deals with both safety at the workplace i.e. to reduce or minimise injury or disease, and with the health and wellbeing of clients, employees and other visitors. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  16. 16. Aim of Work Place Health and Safety The aim of the Work Place Health and Safety Legislation is for employers and employees of an organisation to maintain a safe and healthy workplace environment. Early childhood education and care settings need to provide a safe and healthy environment which meets the physical, emotional, and mental needs of the children, families and educators. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Discussion: Consider where you are right now. Are there any risks around you? Existing or potential. What harm could these risks cause? Which one do you think is the biggest risk?
  17. 17. State/Territory WHS Authorities • In 2009, the Model Work Health and Safety Bill endorsed common or “harmonised” legislation across Australia. • This legislation included a model WHS Act, regulations, Codes of Practice and a national compliance and enforcement policy. • At present State and Territories are at different phases of implementation. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Harmonisation means national uniformity of the WHS legislative framework. This legislative framework is complimented by a nationally consistent approach to compliance and enforcement of policies.
  18. 18. Informing About Child’s Health Needs Effective communication helps families and educators to build a trusting partnership and develop honest and respectful relationships. When families and staff have a genuine interest in one another, people are able to be open about their thoughts and feelings. When families communicate effectively, this allows early childhood educators to understand what is happening at home or how they would like their children’s behaviour managed in the service. Discussion: How do you find out about individual children’s health requirements and routines? How do we communicate with families in an early childhood setting? © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  19. 19. Early childhood education and care services have a duty of care to each child to ensure they are healthy and safe at all times. This means that we have an obligation to support every child to ensure they receive high standards of care. Some of the ways we can ensure this is to: • Ensure that all children working with each child are aware of their particular health needs • Undertake specific training in health management • Develop clear procedures for managing children’s health needs and allergies • Have open communication strategies in place Can we think of any other ways we are able to do this? © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Duty of Care
  20. 20. Ensuring a Child Safe Environment • Having a child safe environment means: – to also take into account the safety and protection of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children – to also offer specialised interventions and a higher level of care for children with special needs or disabilities • To sum up, each child’s abilities and needs should be carefully and individually assessed in consultation with family members. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  21. 21. Why Group Size is Important • Large groups of children are quite simply not easy to manage! • Limiting the group to a smaller, more manageable size makes it convenient to observe how children and adults interact together. • Perhaps most importantly – when part of small groups, children feel safer, more secure and cared for. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  22. 22. Minimising Risk for Children • A risk is anything that can cause harm or loss to a child. • In the context of creating safe environments for children, to minimise risks means to identify and assess risks and to take steps to prevent harm to children because of the action or inaction of another person e.g. an employee, volunteer, or another child. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  23. 23. Minimising Risk for Children cont. • Strategies to minimise risk: – need to be well-understood by everyone in organisation – need to take account of the increased level of risk associated with the specific nature of some activities – need to take account of the vulnerability of particular groups e.g. the age and maturity level of children or if working with children with special needs © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  24. 24. Risk Analysis of Toys and Equipment • Toy safety means to ensure that toys are safe for use by children. • A child hazard that could arise from playing with toys may often not be due to faulty design; usage and chance also result in incidents. • This is why toy manufacturers often display information about the intended age of children. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  25. 25. Risk analysis of Toys and Equipment cont. • Toy manufacturers are required to run tests and risk assessments for toys before making them available in the market. • It is important to be aware of the most common risks and hazards associated with toys. • The solution is not in barring children from playing with toys! 5.6 Check toys and equipment are safe for children and safe to use in their proposed area © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  26. 26. Risks Involved with the Use of Toys • Physical risks: – include choking hazards from small or broken parts, burns or electrical hazards from battery or electricity based toys, or strangulation from wire, string or cord-based toys or parts. • Chemical risks: – include any unintended chemical ingestion or contact from the toys that children play with e.g. teething and mouthing behaviour in infants and toddlers. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  27. 27. Risk Management Compliance Risk management compliance ensures the safety and care of all who attend an early childhood and education care setting. This is achieved by early childhood educators ensuring: • The correct child to staff ratios are adhered to at all times • The regulations will be followed • Proper supervision is observed at all times • The needs of the children must come first • The early childhood education and care setting has guidelines on hygiene and these are implemented • Playgrounds are checked regularly for hazards • All children and educators are aware of the relevant evacuation procedures • Maintaining a high standard of cleanliness within the setting © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  28. 28. Assessing Risk in 4 Steps 1. Identifying hazards – Have a look around you. – Ask your co-workers. Perhaps they’ve seen something you missed, or maybe they know of something you don’t. – Consider your own personal safety needs. You may face hazards that other people haven’t even considered. – Familiarise yourself with the organisation’s policies and procedures on safety. – Make a checklist. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  29. 29. Assessing Risk in 4 Steps cont. 2. Applying controls – Eliminate the hazard – Substitute hazard for a less hazardous one – Isolate people from the hazard – Engineer new designs (equipment, safety features) – Administration controls (training, supervision, policies, procedures) – Use PPE (protective gear) © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  30. 30. Assessing Risk in 4 Steps cont. 3. Reviewing effect – Once a hazard has been identified and dealt with, we need to assess how well those measures have worked. 4. Assessing risks – We must continually ask ourselves what new risks we face, which old risks we still need to deal with, and whether there are any risks that we haven’t considered. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  31. 31. Monitor and Review Risk management is an ongoing process similar to the programming cycle. Risks must be systematically monitored and management strategies reviewed to ensure that they continue to be effective and contribute to a safe and healthy work environment. Documentation To help monitor the effectiveness of risk management strategies and controls, early childhood education and care settings need to keep some systematic records. The following records (at a minimum) should be maintained: • Workplace Health and Safety Audits • Accident/Incident/Injury Reports • Worksheets/checklists used to identify hazards • Risk assessment and control measures implemented • Maintenance records for buildings and equipment • Electrical tagging details • Fire equipment audits • Evacuation drills • Professional development by staff relating to work health and safety © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  32. 32. Steps in Assessing Risk for Excursions • Provide parents with details of the excursion • Ensure that parents have submitted a written consent for their child to be included • Identify the number of adult supervisors, including helping parents • Prepare a supervision plan with details of the excursion site, any high risk activities, presence of animals, location of bathroom and nappy change facilities etc. • Inform educators about supervision arrangements and their duties • Review and evaluate the effectiveness of the supervision plan • Ensure quality engagement with children • Arrange appropriate and safe means of transport • Identify any water hazards or water activities involved • Estimate the approximate duration of the excursion Complete excursion risk management template activity. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  33. 33. Setting up “Risk Controls” • As a measure of risk control organisations designate staff for handling safety issues and hazards. • The designated staff is required to be able to: – describe the hazard and how it may cause injury or illness – identify relevant laws, standards and guidelines – prepare an action plan to identify, assess and control the hazard © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  34. 34. Hierarchy of Risk Control • The hierarchy of risk control (from Safe Work Australia Work Health And Safety – Risks Code of Practice) is the ranking of ways to control risks, ranked from the highest level of protection and reliability to the lowest. • Level 1 controls – Eliminate hazards • Level 2 controls – Substitute the hazard with something safer – Isolate the hazard from people – Use engineering controls • Level 3 controls – Use administrative controls – Use personal protective equipment (PPE) © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  35. 35. What To Do In An Emergency? • Despite reducing risks in the child care environment, there will be times when emergencies occur. • Emergencies include gas leaks, choking, motor vehicle or playground accidents, chronic illnesses and childhood disease. • Emergency procedures therefore need to be displayed prominently across the service centre. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  36. 36. What To Do In An Emergency? cont. • Emergency procedures may include: – Phone numbers of emergency medical services. – Transportation to an emergency facility. – Notification of parents. – Where to meet if the child care setting is evacuated. – Plans for an adult to care for the children while a caregiver stays with injured children. This includes escorting children to emergency medical care. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  37. 37. Six most Hazardous Task’s in Early Childhood The six most common hazardous tasks in the children’s services sector: 1. Lifting children in/out of cots and highchairs or on/off change tables - Bending, twisting and reaching to lift children due to the design, placement or characteristics of cots, highchairs or change tables. 2. Working at low levels - Awkward postures, tripping or falling due to sitting on children’s furniture or the floor. 3. Moving equipment - Lifting, moving, carrying, pushing or pulling heavy or awkward indoor and outdoor play equipment. 4. Storing supplies and equipment - Tripping, falling or being hit by falling objects due to overcrowded or poorly designed storage areas. Bending, lifting, twisting and using high or unexpected force to move heavy or awkward objects. 5. Using office areas - Awkward body postures due to poorly designed, cluttered or inappropriate office areas. Tripping, falling or being hit by falling objects due to poorly designed office areas. 6. Maintaining indoor and outdoor areas - Falling from height while standing on chairs and tables to display artwork. Tripping or falling over toys or on poorly maintained, uneven or wet floor surfaces. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  38. 38. Common Workplace Hazards • A hazard is a source of potential harm or a situation that could cause or lead to harm to people or property. • We can categorise work hazards as: – Physical – Chemical – Biological – Mechanical – Psychological © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Discussion: How do we maintain acceptable levels of hygiene while minimising the use of toxic products?
  39. 39. Potential Hazards to Children • Some common child hazards involving small toys include: – Choking on broken pieces or small parts of the toy – Ingestion of magnetic toys – Toy vehicle incidents involving batteries and chemical substances – Cuts by sharp parts of the toy © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  40. 40. How Do We Identify Hazards? • Define the hazard – The tasks involved in working with children will dictate the type of hazards that may occur in a typical child care environment. • Ask other staff members – Staff members carry out a number of work-tasks every day and are therefore well-aware of the risks involved with their respective duties. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  41. 41. How do we identify hazards? cont. • Job safety check – It is useful to assess each step of daily tasks for possible hazards. • Analyse injury history – This can be done by asking staff members, monitoring first aid reports or any compensation claims that may be on record. • Conduct safety audits – Audits include observations of employee working habits doing a variety of job tasks. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  42. 42. Identifying Hazards in the Work Place There are probably many things that you are already doing that will help you identify some of the major hazards in your workplace. A few examples include: • Daily safety checks of your indoor and outdoor environment and your equipment. • Common patterns that emerge from your accident/incident and illness forms to identify a common risk indicator for developing a plan of action to minimise occurrences. • Knowledge of illnesses and infections prevalent in your local area. • Regular safety audits tailored to your service. • Your hazard reporting procedure for educators and families. • Your food safety plan. • Your infection control policy and procedures © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  43. 43. Cleaning Routines Each early childhood educator is rostered to perform cleaning duties for the health and safety of the children and to ensure the presentation of the Centre is of a high standard. The Director is responsible for developing the cleaning roster and monitoring performance. Cleaning schedules will be developed based on “Staying Healthy in Child Care Guidelines". The health and hygiene policies and Operations Manual provides information about maintaining a healthy, hygienic and safe environment for children and educators to prevent the spread of disease. All early childhood educators are responsible for ensuring the environment is clean and hygienic. The settings comprehensive hygiene policy covers all areas of hygiene including educating children and the educators about hygiene practices. Make a schedule that suggests the cleaning required on a daily basis within an early childhood education and care setting for the 2 – 3 yrs. room. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  44. 44. Sanitation and Hygiene Procedures • Proper sanitation is crucially important in child care settings. • Children touch and put in their mouths everything they can get their hands on – especially toys. • Toys frequently trade hands – and germs – with other children, and therefore keeping them clean is important. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  45. 45. Arranging Equipment and Furniture Appropriately • The environment should be arranged to assure “smooth traffic flow” i.e. provide children room to move around without bumping into one another. • When children are able to move smoothly through the room, they feel less confined and the chances of them tripping and falling over is minimised. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  46. 46. Incidents and Injuries If a child is injured within an early childhood education and care setting, service providers need to follow the procedures outlined. Report the incident to the nominated supervisor (director), immediately. Ensure that the child is kept under close supervision until the parent/guardian collects the child. Serious incidents that happen within the education and care setting need to be recorded on the incident/accident and illness report. Discussion: How do we ensure the environment is organised to balance supervision and the school age children’s need for privacy and autonomy? © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  47. 47. Reporting Serious Incidents • Notifiable or serious incidents may include: – the death of a person – a “serious injury or illness”, or – a dangerous incident arising out of work • If a notifiable incident occurs: – immediately report the incident to a regulator – provide written notification to a regulator if this is required – preserve the incident site until an inspector arrives © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Classroom Activity: Go to www.acecqa.gov.au and download the form you would use to fill in where there is an injury on the service premises. Complete the form using a fictional situation.
  48. 48. Immunisation in Early Childhood Immunisation records are a necessary requirement for all early childhood educators and therefore are to also accompany the completed educators profile. It is a recommendation that at early childhood educators, review their immunisation status with their Doctor and follow a recommended vaccination programme. • Influenza • Whooping cough • Measles, mumps and rubella • Chickenpox • Hepatitis A © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Discussion: How do we keep up to date about current child and adult immunisation?
  49. 49. Exclusion in Early Childhood Educators and staff in the early childhood education and care service your child attends work hard to limit the spread of disease and prevent illness in the care service. Parents are sometimes asked to keep their child at home (called ‘exclusion’) in the event of illness or disease within the care service. The aim of exclusion is to reduce the spread of infectious diseases in the care service. The less contact there is between people who have an infectious disease and people who are at risk of catching the disease, the less chance the disease has of spreading. By excluding one ill child, many other children (and staff) can be protected from becoming ill. The need for exclusion and the length of time a child is excluded depends on: how easily the infection can spread how long the child is likely to be infectious how severe the disease can be How do we communicate with families if there is an outbreak of an infectious illness? How do we ensure families are informed about and follow the service’s policy and guidelines for the exclusion of ill children? © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  50. 50. Notifiable Diseases • A notifiable disease is any disease that is required by law to be reported to government authorities. • The Communicable Diseases Network Australia has prepared a list of diseases that is notified nationally and is available at: • http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ main/publishing.nsf/Content/cdna- casedefinitions.htm © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  51. 51. Procedures for Notifiable Diseases • Isolate the infected child from other children. • Ensure the child is comfortable and appropriately supervised. • Contact the child’s parents or nominated emergency contact. • Inform the contact of the child’s condition and ask for a parent or other authorised person to pick the child up as quickly as possible. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  52. 52. Procedures for Notifiable Diseases cont. • Inform the child’s parents or guardian in the child’s home language. • Inform all families and educators of the presence of an infectious disease. • Ensure that all bedding, towels and clothing used by the child is disinfected. Wash these items separately and if possible air-dry them in the sun. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  53. 53. Procedures for notifiable diseases cont. • Ensure all toys used by the infected child are disinfected. • Ensure all eating utensils used by the child are separated and sterilised. • Ensure confidentiality of any personal health related information obtained by the service and educators in relation to any child or their family. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Discussion: Refer to legislative requirements in your state or territory that affect you, list five different illnesses that are notifiable.
  54. 54. Children’s Requirement for Sleep and Rest As sleep and rest times are generally a significant aspect of babies and young children’s routines, it is essential that we understand and implement safe sleeping practices. All children are encouraged to rest for a minimum of 20 minutes, but no child is forced to sleep. Rest periods for young children, routines and environments also need to be flexible enough to support children who do not require sleep and those who seek rest and relaxation throughout the day. Quiet activities are provided for children who do not sleep. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  55. 55. Environments that Promote Rest and Sleep • A good sleeping environment helps children meet their essential requirement for rest and sleep. • Creating a suitable environment means taking into account the amount of light, the temperature and the amount of noise in the room. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  56. 56. Environments that Promote Rest and Sleep cont. • Bright lights emulate day-time and communicate to the body that it is time to be awake, while dim lights signal the body it is time to sleep. • Room temperature should essentially be neither too hot nor too cold. The room should be well ventilated. • Childen’s sleeping area should be located away from the “traffic center” of the service or home. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  57. 57. SIDS Each year sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and fatal sleep accidents claim the lives of many babies as a result of unsafe sleeping practices that could have been avoided. SIDS has developed a resource kit that provides practical information to assist services develop sleeping practices and policies that meet the best national practice guidelines. Discussion: Lets look at SIDS Resource Kit and now complete the Safe Baby Sleep Practice Activity. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  58. 58. Childhood illnesses and appropriate responses • Allergies – Animal fur or dander, mould, dust mites, pollen, insect bites and certain foods such as nuts, eggs, seafood and dairy products • Most allergies can be managed by having the child avoid allergens. • Treatment with antihistamines and topical skin treatments may be suggested by doctors. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  59. 59. Allergy and Allergens • An allergy is a natural reaction of the human immune system to substances in the environment called allergens. • Allergens take the form of dust mites, pet fur, insect bites or sting, pollen, and sometimes even food or medicine. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  60. 60. Allergy and Allergens cont. • For many of us allergens are quite harmless – however those with a genetic or inherited tendency to react to allergens may present with “allergic inflammation” e.g. redness or swelling when exposed to allergens. • This may cause symptoms in the nose or eyes, skin or lungs. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  61. 61. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  62. 62. Symptoms of Allergies in Children • They seem to always have a cold. • Their nose is continually stuffy or running and they seem to sneeze a lot. • The mucus that drains from their nose is clear and thin. • Their eyes are itchy, red, and watery • They breathe mostly through the mouth. • The skin under their eyes might look dark purple or blue. • They may have a persistent dry cough. • Their skin is irritated or broken out in an itchy, red rash. Can you think of any other symptoms children may show? © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  63. 63. The 4 Symptoms of Allergy • The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) has identified 4 specific symptoms of allergy: © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Nose, eyes, sinuses and throat Lungs and chest Stomach and bowel Skin
  64. 64. What is Anaphylaxis? • Anaphylaxis is a whole-body allergic reaction to a chemical that has become an allergen. • This is a medical emergency because the symptoms of anaphylaxis – such as difficulty in breathing and severe swelling – can be life threatening! • It may occur within seconds of exposure to something a person is allergic to. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  65. 65. What Causes Anaphylaxis? • Some of the more frequent allergens that cause anaphylaxis are peanuts, shellfish, insect stings and drugs. • Less common causes include the use of latex, some medications used in anesthesia, and exercise. • Anaphylaxis triggered by exercise may vary from person to person. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  66. 66. Symptoms of Anaphylaxis • Skin reactions, including hives along with itching, and flushed or pale skin • The sensation of a lump in the throat • Constriction of the airways and a swollen tongue or throat, which can cause wheezing and trouble breathing • A weak and rapid pulse • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea • Dizziness or fainting © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  67. 67. Using an Adrenalin Auto Injector for Anaphylaxis • Adrenaline is the first line emergency treatment for anaphylaxis and must be used promptly. • It works within minutes to reduce throat swelling, open up the airways and maintain blood pressure. • Delaying adrenaline may result in deterioration or death of the individual experiencing anaphylaxis. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  68. 68. Using an Adrenalin Auto Injector for Anaphylaxis cont. • Adrenaline autoinjectors are automatic injectors that contain a single, fixed dose of adrenaline. • They are designed for use particularly by those who are not medically trained. • In Australia and New Zealand, there are two brands of adrenaline autoinjectors: EpiPen® and Anapen® 300 © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  69. 69. How to use EpiPen® © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Form fist around EpiPen® and pull off BLUE SAFETY RELEASE. Place ORANGE end against outer mid-thigh (with or without clothing). PUSH DOWN HARD until a click is heard or felt and hold in place for 10 seconds. REMOVE EpiPen®. Massage injection site for 10 seconds
  70. 70. How to use Anapen® © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13 Pull off black needle shield. Pull off grey safety cap from red button. Place needle end firmly against outer mid-thigh at 90o angle (with or without clothing). Press red button so it clicks and hold for 10 seconds. Remove Anapen® and do not touch needle. Massage injection site for 10 seconds.
  71. 71. What is Asthma? • Asthma is a disorder caused by inflammation in the airways that lead to the lungs. • This inflammation causes airways to tighten and narrow, which blocks air from flowing freely into the lungs, making it hard to breathe. • Childhood asthma can be triggered by a cold or other respiratory infection © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  72. 72. Symptoms of Asthma • Frequent coughing • A whistling or wheezing sound when exhaling • Shortness of breath • Chest congestion or tightness • Chest pain, particularly in younger children • Trouble sleeping caused by shortness of breath, coughing or wheezing • Bouts of coughing or wheezing that get worse with a respiratory infection, such as a cold or the flu • Delayed recovery after a respiratory infection • Trouble breathing that may limit play or exercise • Fatigue, which can be caused by poor sleep © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  73. 73. How to Prevent an Asthma Attack • A doctor may prescribe drugs known as controllers commonly used to prevent asthma attacks. • Controllers include inhaled steroids that help reduce inflammation and prevent wheezing fits. • Again a nebuliser or MDI may be used to administer the steroid. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  74. 74. How to Prevent an Asthma Attack • Minimise the child’s exposure to dust. Cover the mattress, remove carpeting and plush toys from the room, use blinds instead of fabric drapes, and wash the bedding in hot water. • Avoid cigarette smoke as it irritates the lungs. • Be wary of air pollution as it irritates the lungs and causes breathing problems. • Avoid using a fireplace or wood stove. The smoke may irritate the child’s respiratory system. • To the possible extent, keep family pets outside of the living area. • Keep the indoors humidity level between 35 and 50 percent in order to stop the growth of mold – a common allergen. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  75. 75. Dealing with an Asthma Attack • Quick relievers or rescue inhalers are used to stop an asthma attack. • These fast-acting medications relieve the spasms in the airway, making breathing easier. • Quick-reliever drugs are administered using either a nebuliser machine or a metered-dose inhaler (MDI). © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  76. 76. Dealing with an Asthma Attack • A nebuliser is an electric or battery-powered machine that turns liquid medicine into a mist that a child can breathe into his lungs through a mask. • Nebulised breathing treatments usually take about ten minutes. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  77. 77. Dealing with an Asthma Attack • An MDI is a small aerosol can that is inserted into a long tube called a holding chamber or “spacer”, which has a small mask attached to it. • The prescribed medicine is sprayed into the holding chamber and then inhaled by the child who breathes through the mask. • This type of breathing treatment can be given in less than a minute. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  78. 78. Medication Management Plan A parent of the child must provide a medical management plan for the child. This medical management plan must be followed in the event of an incident relating to the child's specific health care need, allergy or relevant medical condition (regulation 90(1)(c)(i) and (ii)). Best practice is that the child’s registered medical practitioner is consulted by parents in the development of the medical management plan and that the advice from the medical practitioner is documented in the medical management plan. The medical management plan should detail the following: • details of the specific health care need, allergy or relevant medical condition including the severity of the condition • any current medication prescribed for the child • the response required from the service in relation to the emergence of symptoms • any medication required to be administered in an emergency • the response required if the child does not respond to initial treatment • when to call an ambulance for assistance. Now lets complete a medication management plan in relation to a child with anaphylaxis. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  79. 79. Children’s Medication Requirements Each early childhood education and care setting will have their own Administration of Medication Policy that you will need to follow. Ensure medication is not left in the children’s bags or lockers. Keep all medications in the designated area out of the reach of the children. A medication form is provided in the rooms Sign in – sign out folder for parents to write down their child’s medication details. Parents must write the following details on the medication form each day their child attends the Centre: • Parents authorisation • Dosage to be administered • Time dosage is to administered NOTE: Medication must not be administered to a child by a service provider if the parent has forgotten, (on the day) to enter the above details on their child’s medication sheet. If the parent has forgotten, the service provider must contact the parent immediately to obtain the medication details and consent. How do we ensure that the service adopts the best practices in relation to the administration of medication for children? What arrangements do we need to make for older children (school aged children) to be able to administer their own medication? © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  80. 80. Administration of Paracetamol Written permission to administer panadol is usually obtained from parents when completing the enrolment form for their child. To ensure permission has been granted, educators must check the permission to administer Panadol section on the enrolment form when reception gives them the enrolment form to peruse before children begin care at the centre. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  81. 81. Child Protection Early childhood educators have an obligation to monitor the health and wellbeing of all children in their care. Child abuse or neglect impairs a child’s physical and emotional health and development. To provide a safe environment for our children, educators must watch for any behavioural signs indicating abuse or neglect including, physical, emotional, psychological or sexual abuse. In turn, educators have a legal responsibility to report any suspected or known child abuse or report any suspicion of non-accidental physical injury to children and/or sexual abuse of children. In a case of suspected abuse, the interests and dignity of the child must be respected. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  82. 82. Susie’s Story • Susie is a 5 year old girl who is experiencing maltreatment at home. • Susie lives with her mother. Her father works far away and visits only once a week. • Susie doesn’t get to meet her father too often. He visits very late at night, but when he does, she hears her mother arguing with him rather loudly. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  83. 83. Susie’s Story cont. • During the week Susie’s mother often screams at her, calls her degrading names, and threatens to kill her when Susie misbehaves. • Susie doesn’t talk in class anymore. She doesn't have any friends in her neighborhood, and she has lost a lot of weight. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  84. 84. Consequences of Child Maltreatment • Increased risk for adverse health effects and chronic diseases e.g. heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, liver disease, obesity, high blood pressure and high cholesterol • Hyperactivity and sleep disturbances • Increased risk for smoking, alcoholism and drug abuse • Likely to use illicit drugs • Likely to experience problems such as delinquency, teen pregnancy and low academic achievement • Lack of ability to establish and maintain healthy intimate relationships in adulthood © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  85. 85. Child Health and Safety in the Context of Electrical Safety • Educators and parents should create awareness among children about electricity and how to be safe around it by: – Demonstrating – Informing and warning about serious hazards particularly involving water and electrical appliances – Discussing electrical safety over family meetings © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  86. 86. Basic Home Fire Safety • Here are some sources that may lead to the start or spreading of a fire: – Open flames e.g. candles, fireplaces, barbecues, heaters, welding equipment. – Cigarettes, cigars, smoking pipes, match sticks etc. – Electrical appliances that generate heat and may overheat or ignite. – Ovens, heaters, electric blankets, refrigerators, television sets, DVD players or laptops. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  87. 87. Smoke Alarms • Smoke alarms help save lives. • A functional smoke alarm increases our chances of escaping a fire incident by providing early warning of the fire. • The two options for installing a smoke alarm are: – Battery-powered smoke alarm – Smoke alarms connected to 240 volt mains power © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  88. 88. Smoke Alarms cont. • Ideal smoke alarm placement locations may include: – outside bedroom or sleeping area – outside the room where the primary carer sleeps – inside the bedroom, if sleeping with the door closed – between kitchen/living areas and bedroom – in a common hallway that connects bedrooms – at separate ends of the house if sleeping areas exist in both areas © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  89. 89. Smoke Alarms cont. • Smoke alarm maintenance should be conducted on a regular basis. This includes: – Changing the battery at least once every year – Testing the smoke alarm at least once a month – Cleaning the alarm at least once in six months – Replacing a smoke alarm that has out-lived its service life © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  90. 90. Organisational Standards, Policies and Procedures • Individuals and organisations dealing in child education and care services are required to comply with the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children. • All organisational policies should be aligned to the core outcomes of the Framework – these outcomes are: 1. Children live in safe and supportive families and communities. 2. Children and families access adequate support to promote safety and intervene early. 3. Risk factors for child abuse and neglect are addressed. 4. Children who have been abused or neglected receive the support and care they need for their safety and wellbeing. 5. Indigenous children are supported and safe in their families and communities. 6. Child sexual abuse and exploitation is prevented and survivors receive adequate support. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  91. 91. Rights and Responsibilities of a PCBU • A PCBU is a “person conducting a business or undertaking”. • When we say PCBU we are really referring to the legal entity conducting the business. • The PCBU has the primary duty of care for workplace health and safety and must ensure the health and safety of workers, customers and visitors by minimising risks at the workplace. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  92. 92. Rights and Responsibilities of a PCBU cont. • A worker is someone who carries out work for a PCBU e.g. employee, labour hire staff, volunteer, apprentice, work experience student, contractor etc. • A worker must take reasonable care for their own safety at work and ensure that they do not adversely affect the health and safety of others. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  93. 93. Rights and Responsibilities of Employers and Employees Employers can include: not for profit organisations, private companies, community organisations, franchises, local governments or any other business that has management control of the workplace. Their fundamental responsibility is to provide a safe and healthy work environment. They must: protect the health and safety of workers and anyone else affected by workplace activities including children, families, contractors and visitors identify and control workplace health and safety risks for all people in the workplace including staff, children, families, contractors and visitors consult with employees on matters that affect their health, safety and welfare; and provide adequate training and supervision for all employees to work safely. Everyone working in your education and care setting has a work health and safety responsibility and this includes contractors or agency staff. Employees must: • carry out their work in a way that does not put their own health and safety, at risk, or that of others in the workplace • identify and report potential workplace hazards • report all work-related injuries • implement service’s policies and procedures; and • participate in workplace consultation about health and safety matters © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  94. 94. List of WHS Policies and Procedures All early childhood education and care services should have a policy on work place health and safety, and on matters that affect children's safety. Some work place health and safety matters to consider are: • Emergency planning * Ergonomics • Critical incident management * Ladder safety and working at heights • First Aid * Harassment and bullying • Accident and incident reporting * Plant safety • Workplace inspections * Workplace stress • Hazard identification and control * Preventive maintenance • Chemical and hazardous substances * Security • Electrical safety * Slips, trips and falls • Environmental Issues * technology safety issues • Kitchen safety * Vehicles and Transport • Manual Handling * Injury management • Personal Safety © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  95. 95. Emergency Procedures at the Workplace • Workplace emergencies can include: – Serious injury incidents – Events requiring evacuation – Fires and explosions – Hazardous substance spills – Explosion and bomb alerts – Security emergencies, such as armed robberies, intruders and disturbed persons – Internal emergencies, such as loss of power or water supply and structural collapse – Natural disasters © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  96. 96. Emergency Procedures at the Workplace cont. • Staff members are to follow emergency procedures as per organisational procedure. • Designated staff members should be prepared to take initial action to control or confine the emergency. • Those responding to emergencies should only provide assistance to the extent of their personal limitations! © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  97. 97. Consultation Effective consultation occurs when information on matters which may affect health, safety and welfare is shared with employees. They must be given the opportunity to express their views and opinions so that these can be taken into account when decisions are made about work health and safety. In most Australian jurisdictions, consultation is a legal requirement, so it is important to establish mechanisms which suit the workplace and comply with current legal requirements. Example of consultation and communication processes: *Notice boards *Intranet * Emails *Daily discussion * Staff meetings * Memos *WHS Committee *WHS Representatives © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  98. 98. Staff Training Early childhood educators receive ongoing training in the workplace through their day to day learning and activities, although WHS should be a part of the overall early childhood service training program. WHS Training should be included in: • Any induction training undertaken at the service • Ongoing supervision and management training WHS training includes: • On the job training facilitated by co-workers, supervisors, managers or employers. • Instruction on WHS responsibilities and daily practices. • Specific hazard training • Work procedures and skill training • Emergency procedure training • First aid training • WHS representative training © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  99. 99. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) • Wash hands regularly, especially after contact with urine and saliva and after removing disposable gloves. • Use disposable gloves (e.g. latex or vinyl) for activities that involve contact with urine and saliva. • Cover cuts with water resistant dressings. • Provide information to workers about CMV risks during pregnancy and work practices to reduce the risk of infection. • Regularly clean surfaces and items that are soiled with urine and saliva, including nappy change mats, potties and toys. • Implement hygienic nappy changing and toileting practices • Instruct workers to inform their employer if they are pregnant or expect to become pregnant. • Advise workers to discuss CMV risks with their doctor if pregnant or planning to become pregnant soon. • Consider relocating workers who are pregnant or who expect to become pregnant to care for children aged over two years of age. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1: Health and Safety Tips for Educators Version Date:
  100. 100. Conclusion The aim of the Workplace Health and Safety legislation is for employers and employees of an organisation to maintain a safe and healthy workplace environment. Early childhood education and care settings provide a safe and healthy environment which meets the physical, emotional, and mental needs of the children, families and educators. © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  101. 101. CHCECE002 - Ensure the Health and Safety of Children Elements and Performance Criteria: 1. Support each child’s health needs 1.1 - Communicate with families about children’s health needs 1.2 - Maintain confidentiality in relation to children’s individual health needs 1.3 - Assist others to implement appropriate practices when administering medication 1.4 - Check written authorisation form to administer medication from the parent or guardian 1.5 - Check the medication does not exceed its use by date, is supplied in its original packaging and displays the child’s name 1.6 - Store medication appropriately 2. Provide opportunities to meet each child’s need for sleep, rest and relaxation. 2.1 - Ensure sleep and rest practices are consistent with approved standards and meet children’s individual needs 2.2 – Provide appropriate quiet play activities for children who do not sleep or rest 2.3 – Respect children’s needs for privacy during toileting and dressing and undressing times 2.4 – Ensure children’s and families individual clothing needs and preferences are met, to promote children’s comfort, safety and protection within the scope of the service requirements for children’s health and safety 2.5 – Share information about individual children’s rest and sleep with families as appropriate © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  102. 102. CHCECE002 - Ensure the Health and Safety of Children cont. 3. Implement effective hygiene and health practices 3.1 – Consistently implement hygiene practices that reflect advice from relevant health authorities 3.2 – Support children to learn personal hygiene practices 3.3 – Implement the service health and hygiene policy and procedures consistently 3.4 – Ensure that services cleanliness is consistently maintained 3.5 – Observe and respond to signs of illness and injury in children and systematically record and share information with families 3.6 – Consistently implement the service policies for the exclusion of ill children 3.7 – Discuss health and hygiene issues with children 4. Supervise children to ensure safety 4.1 – Supervise children by ensuring all are in sight or hearing distance at all times 4.2 – Adjust levels of supervision depending upon the area of the service and the skill, age mix, dynamics and size of the group of children, and the level of risk involved in activities 4.3 – Exchange information about supervision with colleagues to ensure adequate supervision at all times © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  103. 103. CHCECE002 - Ensure the Health and Safety of Children Cont. 5. Minimise Risk 5.1 – Assist in the implementation of safety checks and the monitoring of buildings, equipment, and the general environment 5.2 – Consistently implement policy and procedures regarding the use and storage and labelling of dangerous products 5.3 – Follow service procedures for the safe collection of each child, ensuring they are released to authorised persons 5.4 – Assist in the supervision of every person who enters the service premises where children are present 5.5 – Discuss sun safety with children and implement appropriate measure to protect children from over exposure to ultra violet radiation 5.6 – Check toys and equipment are safe for children and safe to use in their proposed area 5.7 – Remove any hazards immediately or secure the area to prevent children accessing the hazard 6. Contribute to the ongoing management of allergies 6.1 – Identify and recognise signs, symptoms and key characteristics of allergies and anaphylaxis 6.2 – Apply organisational risk management strategies for children with severe allergies 6.3 – Follow Organisational policies and legislative requirements in relation to medication for anaphylaxis 7. Contribute to the ongoing management of asthma 7.1 – Identify signs, symptoms and triggers of asthma 7.2 – Identify children who have an asthma management plan and follow that plan 7.3 – Follow organisational policies and legislative requirements in relation to medication for asthma © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  104. 104. HLTWHS003 – Maintain Work Health and Safety Elements and Performance Criteria: 1. Contribute to workplace procedures for identifying hazards an controlling risks 1.1 – Identify existing and potential hazards and record them according to workplace procedures 1.2 – Contribute to the development of strategies for implementing risk controls in line with workplace procedures and policies 1.3 – Implement risk controls in line with the hierarchy of risk control and workplace and legislative requirements 1.4 Identify and report issues with risk controls, including residual risk, in line with workplace and legislative requirements 2. Implement policies and procedures into work team processes 2.1 – Regularly provide information about WHS policies and procedures to the work team 2.2 – Provide information about identified hazards and the outcome of risk assessment and risk controls to the work team 2.3 – Monitor housekeeping practices to ensure that WHS policies and procedures are followed 2.4 – Maintain WHS incident records in the work area according to workplace procedures and legislative requirements © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  105. 105. HLTWHS003 – Maintain Work Health and Safety Cont. 3. Support consultation, cooperation and communication 3.1 – Support workplace consultative procedures by encouraging work team participation in consultation activities 3.2 – Report health and safety issues in line with workplace procedures and legislative requirements 3.3 – Encourage and assist work team members to contribute to WHS © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  106. 106. CHCECE016 - Establish and Maintain a Safe & Healthy Environment for Children Elements and Performance Criteria: 1. Support Each Child’s Health Needs 1.1 – Discuss individual children’s health requirements and routines with families at enrolment an then on a regular basis 1.2 – Ensure that any concerns or questions about a child’s health needs are conveyed to their family 1.3 – Consult with relevant authorities to ensure that health information is current 1.4 – Ensure that individual medical management plans for children with specific health care need are in place and readily available at the service 2. Provide for each child’s comfort 2.1 – Ensure that groupings of children are configured to provide for each child’s comfort and to minimise the risk of overcrowding 2.2 – Make sure physical spaces are available for children to engage in rest and quiet activities 2.3 – Offer a range of active and restful experiences to children and support them to make appropriate decisions regarding participation © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  107. 107. CHCECE016 - Establish and Maintain a Safe & Healthy Environment for Children Cont. 3. Promote and Implement Effective Hygiene Practices. 3.1 – Ensure that the service accesses information on current hygiene practices 3.2 – Maintain written procedures and schedules to ensure a regular regime of washing toys and equipment 3.3 – Provide families with information and support that helps them to follow service’s hygiene procedures 3.4 – Ensure that information about correct hand washing procedures are displayed in relevant areas of the service 4. Take steps to control the spread of infectious diseases 4.1 – Configure groupings of children to minimise the risk of illness and injuries 4.2 – Source information about recognised health and safety guidelines 4.3 – Ensure that service procedures are followed, in relation to notifying families of illness or injuries that affect children while in education and care 4.4 – Advise families and public health authorities where necessary of cases of infectious diseases at the service and provide them with relevant information 4.5 – Ensure current records of children’s immunisation status are up to date and a procedure is in place to maintain the currency 4.6 – Provide information to families and educators about child and adult immunisation recommendations © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  108. 108. CHCECE016 -Establish and Maintain a Safe & Healthy Environment for Children Cont. 5. Ensure adequate supervision of children 5.1 – Arrange equipment, furniture and activities to ensure effective supervision while also allowing children to access private and quiet spaces 5.2 – Ensure new or relief educators are informed of supervision arrangements and of what they are required to do in relation to supervising children 5.3 – Undertake risk assessment for each excursion including implications for supervision 6. Take precaution to protect children from harm 6.1 – Ensure safety checks are consistently implemented and action is taken as a result of the checks 6.2 – Check risk minimisation plans are in place for children enrolled at the service who have a specific health care need, allergy or relevant medial condition 6.3 – Ensure simple warning signs are located where potentially dangerous products are stored 6.4 – Confirm safety of any drinks, food and cooking utensils and appliances used as part of the program 6.5 – Ensure that basic training and testing on how to move and fit car seats, restraints and booster seats is available to all educators 6.6 – Keep records of pest vermin inspections and/or eradications 6.7 – Develop and maintain a written process for monitoring who enters and leaves the premises at all times 6.8 – Provide detailed information to families regarding any excursions being undertaken © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13
  109. 109. CHCECE016 -Establish and Maintain a Safe & Healthy Environment for Children Cont. 7. Develop plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies 7.1 – Ensure emergency procedures are displayed prominently throughout the premises 7.2 – Make certain that all educators have ready access to a phone or similar means of communication 7.3 – Ensure emergency numbers are located near telephones 7.4 – Communicate information to families about the service’s emergency procedures and incident management plans 7.5 – Discuss and practice emergency drills with children, educators and any other people on the premises 7.6 – Ensure that emergency equipment is available and tested and staff are trained in the use of it 7.7 – Maintain a portable record of children’s emergency contacts in case of emergencies © Copyright CTA CHC50213 & CHC50113 MODULE 1, V: 5.12.13

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