February 24, 2008 To all American Warriors & Patriots, In Nov 2007 I released a PowerPoint presentation tribute entitled, ...
LTC Randolph C. White Jr. Infantry Graduation Speech, Fort Benning, Georgia, Summer 2006, by the  Battalion Commander of 2...
Graduating Infantrymen from  LTC White’s battalion Graduating Infantrymen from  LTC White’s battalion  “ Take a look on th...
 “ I’m not talking about a random, hap-hazard sort of action, I’m talking about a deliberate, measured, and when required,...
LTC Randolph C. White Jr  “ Today, your young men join that same fraternity of those who stormed the beaches of Normandy, ...
 “ The reasons for enlisting in the Army are varied and are often deeply personal. But it’s what makes them truly the best...
“ You are privileged to have the one advantage that they all covet, you will know, you will have facts about the goings on...
LTC Randolph C. White Jr  “ I know that these complimentary words might come as a surprise to some of you, because we’ve t...
 “ You will, as the Drill Sergeant already has, hump the steep mountains of Afghanistan with a 120 pound ruck sack on your...
 “ Your Drill Sergeant has fought in Iraq, and he walked, as you soon will, the mean streets in places like Fallujah or Al...
 “ THIS is why duty demanded that the training present a challenge. It’s why you did all those pushups and will do thousan...
 “ Men, you are heading toward the most complicated battlefield in the history of warfare; an asymmetric ‘3-block war’ if ...
 “ You will often find yourselves as part Mayor, District Chief, Police Chief, and arbitrator of disagreements among ethni...
 “ You will personify daily, the euphemisms of the ‘Strategic Corporal’.  A decision that you make under duress, with litt...
Graduating Infantrymen from LTC White’s battalion  “ The techno-wannabees in the corporate world can’t begin the phantom t...
 “ You’ll quell any storm and you will always ride the thunder. You’ll be great daily and absolutely magnificent when face...
 “ Number 1: I’ll see many of you in Iraq later this year. When you see me, come up to me and say hello. Don’t quiver and ...
 “ Secondly, draw your energy in the days ahead from your family. There are those who are here today and who have traveled...
 “ Third, as I have said to each new Soldier I have welcomed into the Army, ‘This is the life that you chose’. I’ll say it...
 “ Number 4: Don’t let the pessimistic television talking heads, the high browed newspaper writers, Hollywood idiots, or a...
 “ Fifth, I for one, will never, ever, apologize for being an American, and don’t you ever feel that you have to [applause...
 “ And finally, but most importantly, to you as Infantrymen, stand tall, suck it up when things get hard, and remember tha...
 “ America’s relying on you as you assume your post on the national wall of defense. ”
 “ May God bless you and protect each and every one of you. Thank you very much. [long applause and standing ovation]”
  Some additional Food For Thought ….
"The faint-hearted, who fear, whose reaction is flight Have no comprehension of those who will fight. To hide their o...
 
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

6 21st Century Spartans

2,277 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,277
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
29
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Infantry Graduation Speech, Fort Benning, Georgia, Summer 2006, by LTC Randolph White Jr., Battalion Commander of 2/58 Infantry Regiment, LTC Randolph White Jr. “ Good morning Ladies and Gentlemen, ….is anybody out there? 2/58 Families, what happened? I mean yesterday .. Good morning Ladies and Gentlemen. (large applause) There we go, that’s more like it. BG Sherlock, Mrs. Sole, Senator Vogel, and friends, families and guests, I want to thank you for attending the graduation ceremony this morning for Delta Company, 2nd Battalion of the 58th Infantry Regiment and Charlie Company, 1st Battalion of the 19th Infantry. On behalf of MG Walter Wachacowski, Commander of Fort Benning, COL Scott Henry, Commander of the Infantry Training Brigade, myself and LTC Thomas Britton, Commander of 1/19 Infantry I would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to today’s graduation ceremony for the Army’s newest Infantrymen. Before I begin, I’d like to ask all of the military veterans that are with us today to once again please stand and be recognized [loud applause]. Thank you for your service. Take a look on the parade field ladies and gentlemen, … take a long hard look. What you see standing out there is representative of the noblest strata of our society. These new Infantrymen and their trainers are America’s 21st Century Spartans. They are now a small segment of our population that guard our national wall of defense, and as arrogant as this may sound, it’s what makes them better than the average young man. Not better in a materiel, snide or arrogant sort of way, but better as it relates to doing something versus hanging out in a coffee shop talking and criticizing. Anyone can talk about what should be done in any given moment, but most won’t do anything about it. You see it every day on your television screens, all sorts of so-called ‘experts’, with great sounding titles and articles that have been published. They’re always ready to give advice, but never ready to pick up a rifle, ruck up and close with the enemy. For my money, there are two kinds of men that walk the earth; men of action and all others (applause). Hooah. What stands before you are men of action. I’m not talking about a random, hap-hazard sort of action, I’m talking about a deliberate, measured, and when required, intensely focused action. To be sitting in the safety of your home, several years into a war, subject to the 24/7 media coverage of that same war and its brutality and then to decide to go and sign up for the Army Infantry says an awful lot about a man’s character. To stick it out when so many in our society look daily for a reason to quit says a great deal about a man’s heart, the support he gets from his family and his ability to see a larger picture. Anyone can start, but not everyone has the heart to finish. Not one Infantryman you see standing before you really wants to go into harms way and risk it all, but their moral clarity won’t allow them to sit back and let someone else provide the blanket of freedom that we here today cherish and so many others take for granted. You are looking at the newest members of that unique band of brotherhood that is the Infantry. Today, your young men join that same fraternity of those who stormed the beaches of Normandy, hunted the enemy in the Ah Sha Valley in Vietnam, parachuted into Panama, beat incredible odds in the streets of Mogadishu Somalia and currently subdue our enemies in Iraq and Afghanistan. When policy makers finish talking, when debate has ceased, when negotiations have failed and orders are given, it becomes the mission of the young men before you to execute national policy. These young men are the substance behind any policies that are taken by this country deemed important enough to send men into harms way. Absolute proof positive that the United States means business when their boots hit the ground. The reasons for enlisting in the Army are varied and are often deeply personal. But it’s what makes them truly the best and brightest that we have in this country, and I’m not saying that to be nice, I’m saying that to because I reverently believe it. The best and the brightest are not necessarily on campus or in the corporate boardroom right now. The best and the brightest are you out there on this parade field. Men, don’t ever think for one minute that the kids running around on some university campus, protesting, breaking things and whining about this, that and the other have anything on you. You are privileged to have the one advantage that they all covet, you will know, you will have facts about the goings on in Iraq, Afghanistan, Djibouti, the Philippines, the Balkans and many other places. Your head will not be filled with the empty theory of those who in actuality know very little because they lack the intestinal fortitude to commit to anything that requires risk. I’m speaking of the snide arrogant sort, who spend the day blaming America for every wrong in the world before going home to sleep at night under that blanket of freedom provided by better men, better men just like you [applause]. Hooah. I know that these complimentary words might come as a surprise to some of you, because we’ve tried to be hard on you, hard, because what lies ahead of you will be tremendously challenging, and for many, the defining chapter in your lives. Life as an Infantryman is not easy, and the collective goal of those charged with your training is to make sure that you understand that. Your Drill Sergeants, like many of them sitting behind me on this stage, and those scattered throughout the crowd know what waits, and our sacred duty is to ensure that you are not surprised. The vast majority of your Drill Sergeants and your Company Commanders have been to the battlefield, and that fact cannot be overstated. They have put into action that which they have taught you. They have moved under fire, they have seen the enemy up close and they know that this endeavor is deadly serious. You will, as the Drill Sergeant already has, hump the steep mountains of Afghanistan with a 120 pound ruck sack on your back, gasping for breath in the thin mountain air in pursuit of the enemy, quadricep muscles screaming, back aching, sleep and rest not forthcoming. Your Drill Sergeant has fought in Iraq, and he walked, as you soon will, the mean streets in places like Fallujah or Al Ramadi, conducting raids with the physically demanding and mentally draining house to house search for the enemy. You’ll react to IEDs and you’ll fight the enemy from 10 feet away, … close combat in its truest form. Under 60 pounds of equipment and body armor, and temperatures that make a normal Georgia summer day seem mild. THIS is why duty demanded that the training present a challenge. It’s why you did all those pushups and will do thousands more. It is why you ran all those miles and will run many more. It is why you fired hundreds of rounds, while you ran, hit the ground and kept going. It’s why you marched to march, with no end in sight. It is why you can take that rifle apart and could reassemble it in the dark. It is why your parents can see the change in you simply by the way you stand. And most importantly, it’s why you have begun to appreciate the brotherhood and pure camaraderie that is gleamed from nights spent in the muggy Georgia heat next to your battle buddy in the pouring rain, finding humor in your predicament, sharing a cold MRE and realizing that you are forming bonds in moments such as these that will truly last a lifetime. Men, you are heading toward the most complicated battlefield in the history of warfare; an asymmetric ‘3-block war’ if you will. You’ll engage in vicious close combat in one block, protect children as they attend school in the next and restore water and power on the third. All of this simultaneously. You will, on a daily basis, make life or death decisions, with only the time it takes to blink one’s eye; to process, decide and take action. You will often find yourselves as part Mayor, District Chief, Police Chief, and arbitrator of disagreements among ethnicities and tribes as varied as our own 50 states. You will personify daily, the euphemisms of the ‘Strategic Corporal’. A decision that you make under duress, with little time for reflection or thought, may quite literally impact the actions of policy custodians in our nation’s capital. That’s night hype fellows, that’s fact. You’re the latest Band of Brothers, miles away from the flag pole, and making things happen the very best way you can. The techno-wannabees in the corporate world can’t begin the phantom the vast responsibilities that you have accepted. You’ll be scrutinized like no warriors before you, expecting to eradicate our enemies, pacify the critics and abide by the rules of land warfare, as only we and our true allies seem committed to doing. You’ll hold more responsibility and do more in the next few years than most people will do in an entire lifetime. High expectations, to be sure, but you will succeed, because you are the 21st Century American Spartan, … sometimes alone, but never afraid. You’ll quell any storm and you will always ride the thunder. You’ll be great daily and absolutely magnificent when faced with adversity. Let me say six final things to the graduating Soldiers: Number 1: I’ll see many of you in Iraq later this year. When you see me, come up to me and say hello. Don’t quiver and quake like you typically do when I walk into a room. [laughter]. Secondly, draw your energy in the days ahead from your family. There are those who are here today and who have traveled a long way to see you, and in some cases did so with great financial or physical duress. Write and call them frequently, your family will often be your greatest strength in the days ahead, and don’t ever forget that. Third, as I have said to each new Soldier I have welcomed into the Army, ‘This is the life that you chose’. I’ll say it again for emphasis, “This is the life that YOU chose.’ It’s not risk free, nor is it always easy. But in the humble opinion of this proud Grunt, it has always been a life well worth living. There is no more noble profession than one of which you are now a member. It’s a portion of your life that is spend in the cold, hot, snow or rain, facing danger during war and peace, while making the best friends you will ever have. …..Guys, … I’ll have your back no matter what life brings. Number 4: Don’t let the pessimistic television talking heads, the high browed newspaper writers, Hollywood idiots, or any other faction of the ‘Blame America First’ crowd, get you down.[applause]. I’m speaking here about the ‘Latte Biscotti Crowd’, they are simple background chatter men, and they will always exist on the periphery of any endeavor that requires selfless service or loyalty. They’re not worthy of your concern, and truth be told, in the pit of their fickly cowardly hearts, they wish they could be just like you. The intestinal fortitude that is part of your fabric is something that they covet, but will never know. Fifth, I for one, will never, ever, apologize for being an American, and don’t you ever feel that you have to [applause]. We’re not perfect, but I can think of no better place on earth. We didn’t become the great country we are by accident. We earned it. And while we were at it, we kept and continue to keep a large portion of the world free. Just ask the veterans that are here today. American blood and sacrifice is the indisputable part of the world equation. We keep a large portion of the world free, and no matter what disaster strikes, tsunamis, floods, earthquakes, we’re the ones who show up first to help. An American aircraft carrier, American Soldiers, American Marines, Air Force transport planes flying in supplies, and even local American church groups. More people in this world are trying to come to our shores than any other country. We remain the beacon of hope for many, and God willing, it will always be so. We’re number 1 and don’t ever apologize for it, just be damn proud of it. [long applause] And finally, but most importantly, to you as Infantrymen, stand tall, suck it up when things get hard, and remember that they can, and usually will get harder. Stay aggressive, keep your weapons clean and your bayonets sharp, parents never stop worrying, so write and call them often. Never panic, because once you do, you’ve lost. Always waterproof your gear, watch out for one another, remember that when things look their worst, you’ll need each other the most. Remain steady, hydrate, do PT everyday, keep your head on a swivel. Remember that it is always better to be the one to deliver the blow, be proud to be called a ‘Grunt’, and remember that you are this country’s 21st Century Spartan. America’s relying on you as you assume your post on the national wall of defense. May God bless you and protect each and every one of you. Thank you very much. [long applause and standing ovation]
  • 6 21st Century Spartans

    1. 1. February 24, 2008 To all American Warriors & Patriots, In Nov 2007 I released a PowerPoint presentation tribute entitled, “These Are My Credentials”, and in January 2008 I released a similar tribute “On Point”, both of which generated an unexpected quantity of positive responses. (Google “These Are My Credentials Coffey” to find several links to these slides ). I Thank you for your kind and supportive words. This presentation, “21 st Century Spartans” , provides the verbatim text of a speech given in the summer of 2006 at Fort Benning Georgia during the “Boot Camp” graduation of Army Infantrymen. The speaker at this event, the Battalion Commander of the 2 nd Battalion of the 58th Infantry Regiment, LTC Randolph C. White Jr., and his remarks need no introduction or comment from me. I will however, share with you a long standing personal opinion; I have always maintained that the one thing the best Soldiers in the world deserve, our American troops, is the best leadership in the world. Leadership which ensures our Soldiers are always the first priority, that their training and equipment is the best in the world, that their every need is addressed and satisfied to the best of our Army’s and our nation’s ability and that their service, bravery and sacrifices are always appreciated and never wasted. I believe LTC White is one of these leaders. Please read his verbatim remarks in the following slides to draw your own conclusions. Always remember our Soldiers, who make the sacrifices, take the fight to the enemy, get shot at and take the bullets, so we don’t have to. Bill Coffey, Soldier (Retired) Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA [email_address] This presentation is provided fully without restrictions. You may use it, post it, distribute it, use its parts in any way you would like. This presentation may be considered “public domain”, while some of the photos may be copyrighted. I receive many photos without credit to the originators and therefore do not know the sources for many of them. The full text of this presentation can be found in the “Notes Page” section of this slide. If any of you know how I might directly contact LTC White, please pass along his contact information to me so that I may personally thank him for his service and leadership. If you have any great quotes, letters, stories or photos you would like to share for future presentations please email to the above address Thanking you in advance!! Bill Coffey, Basra Iraq, June 2006
    2. 2. LTC Randolph C. White Jr. Infantry Graduation Speech, Fort Benning, Georgia, Summer 2006, by the Battalion Commander of 2/58 Infantry Regiment, LTC Randolph White Jr. “ Good morning Ladies and Gentlemen, ….is anybody out there? 2/58 Families, what happened? I mean yesterday .. Good morning Ladies and Gentlemen. (long applause) There we go, that’s more like it. BG Sherlock, Mrs. Sole, Senator Vogel, and friends, families and guests, I want to thank you for attending the graduation ceremony this morning for Delta Company, 2nd Battalion of the 58th Infantry Regiment and Charlie Company, 1st Battalion of the 19th Infantry. On behalf of MG Walter Wachacowski, Commander of Fort Benning, COL Scott Henry, commander of the Infantry Training Brigade, myself and LTC Thomas Britton, Commander of 1/19 Infantry I would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to today’s graduation ceremony for the Army’s newest Infantryman. Before I begin, I’d like to ask all of the military veterans that are with us today to once again please stand and be recognized [loud applause]. Thank you for your service.”
    3. 3. Graduating Infantrymen from LTC White’s battalion Graduating Infantrymen from LTC White’s battalion “ Take a look on the parade field ladies and gentlemen, … take a long hard look. What you see standing out there is representative of the noblest strata of our society. These new Infantrymen and their trainers are America’s 21st Century Spartans. They are now a small segment of our population that guard our national wall of defense, and as arrogant as this may sound, it’s what makes them better than the average young man. Not better in a materiel, snide or arrogant sort of way, but better as it relates to doing something versus hanging out in a coffee shop talking and criticizing. Anyone can talk about what should be done in any given moment, but most won’t do anything about it. You see it every day on your television screens, all sorts of so-called ‘experts’, with great sounding titles and articles that have been published. They’re always ready to give advice, but never ready to pick up a rifle, ruck up and close with the enemy. For my money, there are two kinds of men that walk the earth; men of action and all others (applause). Hooah. What stands before you are men of action.”
    4. 4. “ I’m not talking about a random, hap-hazard sort of action, I’m talking about a deliberate, measured, and when required, intensely focused action. To be sitting in the safety of your home, several years into a war, subject to the 24/7 media coverage of that same war and its brutality and then to decide to go and sign up for the Army Infantry says an awful lot about a man’s character. To stick it out when so many in our society look daily for a reason to quit says a great deal about a man’s heart, the support he gets from his family and his ability to see a larger picture. Anyone can start, but not everyone has the heart to finish. Not one Infantryman you see standing before you really wants to go into harms way and risk it all, but their moral clarity won’t allow them to sit back and let someone else provide the blanket of freedom that we here today cherish and so many others take for granted. You are looking at the newest members of that unique band of brotherhood that is the Infantry. ”
    5. 5. LTC Randolph C. White Jr “ Today, your young men join that same fraternity of those who stormed the beaches of Normandy, hunted the enemy in the Ah Sha Valley in Vietnam, parachuted into Panama, beat incredible odds in the streets of Mogadishu Somalia and currently subdue our enemies in Iraq and Afghanistan. When policy makers finish talking, when debate has ceased, when negotiations have failed and orders are given, it becomes the mission of the young men before you to execute national policy. These young men are the substance behind any policies that are taken by this country deemed important enough to send men into harms way. Absolute proof positive that the United States means business when their boots hit the ground.”
    6. 6. “ The reasons for enlisting in the Army are varied and are often deeply personal. But it’s what makes them truly the best and brightest that we have in this country, and I’m not saying that to be nice, I’m saying that to you because I reverently believe it. The best and the brightest are not necessarily on campus or in the corporate boardroom right now. The best and the brightest are you out there on this parade field. Men, don’t ever think for one minute that the kids running around on some university campus, protesting, breaking things and whining about this, that and the other have anything on you.”
    7. 7. “ You are privileged to have the one advantage that they all covet, you will know, you will have facts about the goings on in Iraq, Afghanistan, Djibouti, the Philippines, the Balkans and many other places. Your head will not be filled with the empty theory of those who in actuality know very little because they lack the intestinal fortitude to commit to anything that requires risk. I’m speaking of the snide arrogant sort, who spend the day blaming America for every wrong in the world before going home to sleep at night under that blanket of freedom provided by better men, better men just like you [applause]. Hooah.”
    8. 8. LTC Randolph C. White Jr “ I know that these complimentary words might come as a surprise to some of you, because we’ve tried to be hard on you, hard, because what lies ahead of you will be tremendously challenging, and for many, the defining chapter in your lives. Life as an Infantryman is not easy, and the collective goal of those charged with your training is to make sure that you understand that. Your Drill Sergeants, like many of them sitting behind me on this stage, and those scattered throughout the crowd know what waits, and our sacred duty is to ensure that you are not surprised. The vast majority of your Drill Sergeants and your Company Commanders have been to the battlefield, and that fact cannot be overstated. They have put into action that which they have taught you. They have moved under fire, they have seen the enemy up close and they know that this endeavor is deadly serious. ”
    9. 9. “ You will, as the Drill Sergeant already has, hump the steep mountains of Afghanistan with a 120 pound ruck sack on your back, gasping for breath in the thin mountain air in pursuit of the enemy, quadricep muscles screaming, back aching, sleep and rest not forthcoming.”
    10. 10. “ Your Drill Sergeant has fought in Iraq, and he walked, as you soon will, the mean streets in places like Fallujah or Al Ramadi, conducting raids with the physically demanding and mentally draining house to house search for the enemy. You’ll react to IEDs and you’ll fight the enemy from 10 feet away, … close combat in its truest form, under 60 pounds of equipment and body armor, and temperatures that make a normal Georgia summer day seem mild.”
    11. 11. “ THIS is why duty demanded that the training present a challenge. It’s why you did all those pushups and will do thousands more. It is why you ran all those miles and will run many more. It is why you fired hundreds of rounds, while you ran, hit the ground and kept going. It’s why you marched to march, with no end in sight. It is why you can take that rifle apart and could reassemble it in the dark. It is why your parents can see the change in you simply by the way you stand. And most importantly, it’s why you have begun to appreciate the brotherhood and pure camaraderie that is gleamed from nights spent in the muggy Georgia heat next to your battle buddy in the pouring rain, finding humor in your predicament, sharing a cold MRE and realizing that you are forming bonds in moments such as these that will truly last a lifetime.”
    12. 12. “ Men, you are heading toward the most complicated battlefield in the history of warfare; an asymmetric ‘3-block war’ if you will. You’ll engage in vicious close combat in one block, protect children as they attend school in the next and restore water and power on the third. All of this simultaneously. You will, on a daily basis, make life or death decisions, with only the time it takes to blink one’s eye; to process, decide and take action. ”
    13. 13. “ You will often find yourselves as part Mayor, District Chief, Police Chief, and arbitrator of disagreements among ethnicities and tribes as varied as our own 50 states.”
    14. 14. “ You will personify daily, the euphemisms of the ‘Strategic Corporal’. A decision that you make under duress, with little time for reflection or thought, may quite literally impact the actions of policy custodians in our nation’s capital. That’s night hype fellows, that’s fact. You’re the latest Band of Brothers, miles away from the flag pole, and making things happen the very best way you can.”
    15. 15. Graduating Infantrymen from LTC White’s battalion “ The techno-wannabees in the corporate world can’t begin the phantom the vast responsibilities that you have accepted. You’ll be scrutinized like no warriors before you, expecting to eradicate our enemies, pacify the critics and abide by the rules of land warfare, as only we and our true allies seem committed to doing. You’ll hold more responsibility and do more in the next few years than most people will do in an entire lifetime. High expectations, to be sure, but you will succeed, because you are the 21st Century American Spartan, … sometimes alone, but never afraid.”
    16. 16. “ You’ll quell any storm and you will always ride the thunder. You’ll be great daily and absolutely magnificent when faced with adversity. Let me say six final things to the graduating Soldiers:”
    17. 17. “ Number 1: I’ll see many of you in Iraq later this year. When you see me, come up to me and say hello. Don’t quiver and quake like you typically do when I walk into a room. [laughter]. ”
    18. 18. “ Secondly, draw your energy in the days ahead from your family. There are those who are here today and who have traveled a long way to see you, and in some cases did so with great financial or physical duress. Write and call them frequently, your family will often be your greatest strength in the days ahead, and don’t ever forget that. ”
    19. 19. “ Third, as I have said to each new Soldier I have welcomed into the Army, ‘This is the life that you chose’. I’ll say it again for emphasis, “This is the life that YOU chose.’ It’s not risk free, nor is it always easy. But in the humble opinion of this proud Grunt, it has always been a life well worth living. There is no more noble profession than one of which you are now a member. It’s a portion of your life that is spend in the cold, hot, snow or rain, facing danger during war and peace, while making the best friends you will ever have. …..Guys, … I’ll have your back no matter what life brings. ”
    20. 20. “ Number 4: Don’t let the pessimistic television talking heads, the high browed newspaper writers, Hollywood idiots, or any other faction of the ‘Blame America First’ crowd, get you down [applause]. I’m speaking here about the ‘Latte Biscotti Crowd’, they are simple background chatter men, and they will always exist on the periphery of any endeavor that requires selfless service or loyalty. They’re not worthy of your concern, and truth be told, in the pit of their fickly cowardly hearts, they wish they could be just like you. The intestinal fortitude that is part of your fabric is something that they covet, but will never know.”
    21. 21. “ Fifth, I for one, will never, ever, apologize for being an American, and don’t you ever feel that you have to [applause]. We’re not perfect, but I can think of no better place on earth. We didn’t become the great country we are by accident. We earned it. And while we were at it, we kept and continue to keep a large portion of the world free. Just ask the veterans that are here today. American blood and sacrifice is the indisputable part of the world equation. We keep a large portion of the world free, and no matter what disaster strikes, tsunamis, floods, earthquakes, we’re the ones who show up first to help. An American aircraft carrier, American Soldiers, American Marines, Air Force transport planes flying in supplies, and even local American church groups. More people in this world are trying to come to our shores than any other country. We remain the beacon of hope for many, and God willing, it will always be so. We’re number 1 and don’t ever apologize for it, just be damn proud of it. [long applause]”
    22. 22. “ And finally, but most importantly, to you as Infantrymen, stand tall, suck it up when things get hard, and remember that they can, and usually will get harder. Stay aggressive, keep your weapons clean and your bayonets sharp, parents never stop worrying, so write and call them often. Never panic, because once you do, you’ve lost. Always waterproof your gear, watch out for one another, remember that when things look their worst, you’ll need each other the most. Remain steady, hydrate, do PT everyday, keep your head on a swivel. Remember that it is always better to be the one to deliver the blow, be proud to be called a ‘Grunt’, and remember that you are this country’s 21st Century Spartan.”
    23. 23. “ America’s relying on you as you assume your post on the national wall of defense. ”
    24. 24. “ May God bless you and protect each and every one of you. Thank you very much. [long applause and standing ovation]”
    25. 25. Some additional Food For Thought ….
    26. 26. "The faint-hearted, who fear, whose reaction is flight Have no comprehension of those who will fight. To hide their own trepidation they attempt to demean The rough men who defend them, as barbaric, obscene Yet rough men stand ready, hard weapons in hand To put placaters behind them, draw a line in the sand To preserve for the peaceniks what they won’t defend So their own unearned freedom won’t perish, won’t end.” - Russ Vaughn, 101st Airborne Division, 1965, Vietnam.

    ×