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UCT, Fort Hare or UNISA: Which university is OER ready?

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UCT, Fort Hare or UNISA: Which university is OER ready?

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UCT, Fort Hare or UNISA: Which university is OER ready? Presentation at UCT Teaching and Learning Conference 2015/16
Glenda Cox & Henry Trotter
30 March 2016

UCT, Fort Hare or UNISA: Which university is OER ready? Presentation at UCT Teaching and Learning Conference 2015/16
Glenda Cox & Henry Trotter
30 March 2016

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UCT, Fort Hare or UNISA: Which university is OER ready?

  1. 1. UCT, Fort Hare or UNISA: Which university is OER ready? Glenda Cox & Henry Trotter Teaching & Learning Conference 2015 University of Cape Town : 30 March 2016www.slideshare.net/ROER4D
  2. 2. Our sub-project research questions • Why do South African lecturers adopt – or do not adopt – OER? [adopt = use and/or create] • What are the social and cultural conditions that shape OER adoption? • What are lecturers’ attitudes towards OER, especially regarding their quality?
  3. 3. University Profiles UCT UFH UNISA Student access Residential Residential Distance Student numbers 26 000 11 000 400 000+ Location Urban Rural Dispersed Approach Traditional Traditional Comprehensive Institutional culture Collegial Bureaucratic Managerial Copyright owner of teaching materials Lecturers Institution Institution
  4. 4. Interviews (N=18) • 6 interviewees per university • Structured • One-on-one • 30 minutes–1 hour interviews • 50-56 questions • Covering multiple elements of teaching and OER activity
  5. 5. Volition to adopt OER Availability of relevant OER of requisite quality (for use or sharing) Capacity technical skills for using, creating, finding, uploading OER – personally or with support Awareness of OER, the concept, and how it differs from other educational resources Permission to use/create OER, as determined by institutional IP policy Access to infrastructure: computers, internet connectivity, electricity Individual Institutional The OER Adoption Pyramid
  6. 6. OER Readiness: academics as users UCT UFH UNISA Volition Availability Capacity Awareness Permission Access Level of OER readiness Very low Low Medium High Very high
  7. 7. OER Readiness: academics as creators UCT UFH UNISA Volition Availability Capacity Awareness Permission Access Level of OER readiness Very low Low Medium High Very high
  8. 8. OER Readiness: institutions as creators UCT UFH UNISA Volition Availability Capacity Awareness Permission Access Level of OER readiness Very low Low Medium High Very high
  9. 9. • UCT is OER ready if the individual academic is viewed as the agent of activity : personal volition is the key • UNISA is OER ready if the institution is viewed as the agent of activity : institutional volition is the key • UFH is not OER ready for either OER use or creation because: both the institution and academics lack awareness; academics lack permission to create So which institution is OER ready?
  10. 10. Glenda Cox – glenda.cox@uct.ac.za Henry Trotter – henry.trotter@uct.ac.za Thank you UCT, Fort Hare or UNISA: Which University is OER Ready? by Glenda Cox and Henry Trotter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Editor's Notes

  • Welcome to this short presentation on considering the readiness of these three SA universities for OER adoption. Henry and I both work in the Centre for Innovation and Teaching and Learning (CILT) at UCT. I will start with a short introduction and Henry will talk about the indicators of readiness and a proposed model of OER adoption.
  • The Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project aims to provide evidence-based research from a number of countries in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa and South / South East Asia. The research here is from one of 18 sub-projects from 26 countries that aims to redress the current imbalance where so much research on OER is from the Global North. The primary objective of the programme is to improve educational policy, practice, and research in developing countries by better understanding the use and impact of OER. For more information, see: http://www.roer4d.org
  • Today we will only explore aspects of the second question that considers the social and cultural conditions necessary for OER adoption. As we began to analyse our research we realised that, to answer these questions, we needed to take one step back to also consider basic structural conditions that also need to exist before OER can be adopted.
  • We travelled to the other universities and conducted workshops on OER and Creative Commons. These universities have quite different characteristics, as the table shows.
  • After conducting the workshops, we interviewed 6 staff members at each university on their teaching and OER in/activities.
  • As we were conducting our research, it became clear that a number of factors shaped OER adoption decisions at these universities. But 6 of them stood out as having a “determinative” effect on OER activity and its potential. These are factors which, if you ask, “can OER activity proceed here without them?”, the answer would be “no”. So we developed what we call The OER Adoption Pyramid.
  • When we used The OER Adoption Pyramid to analyse and compare the three universities, we were able to generate what we call “OER Readiness Tables” to visualise the levels of readiness that each institution has for the different pyramid factors. We do this according to a simple colour scheme based on 5 levels: very low, low, medium, high and very high. But because there are two components to OER adoption – use and creation – as well as two potential agents of OER adoption – academics and institutions – we end up with multiple tables. In this first one, we’re assessing OER readiness if the academic is considered the user.
  • In this second one, this shows OER readiness when the academic is taken as OER creators. Here the key feature is that UFH and UNISA possess copyright over academics’ teaching materials, so academics are not able to create and share OER from their teaching materials. They do not have permission.
  • This third OER readiness table looks at institutions as creators, which shows challenges for a university like UCT (which has given copyright over teaching materials to the academics), challenges for UFH (which lacks awareness and volition) and real opportunities for UNISA which has developed an OER Strategy to potentially (in the future) share its IP assets as OER materials. (There is no need for a table showing institutions as users, because institutions do not typically “use” educational resources; rather academics do that.)
  • This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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