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Inclusion and access within crisis situations: how
can Lebanese multilingual (and multicultural)
classrooms be inclusive a...
Questions
Policy Makers
How can we meet the challenges of providing quality education in a
emergency situation?
• Integrat...
Findings: Student Profiles
www.britishcouncil.org 3
• Profile 1: Students enrolled in Arabic language schools (some with
limited French or English instruction).
• Profile 2: ...
Theoretical underpinnings
Sociolinguistic approach (framework - Louise Dabène: 1998)
• Changing attitudes: perceptions and...
Some of the issues /barriers
• Linguistic diversity
• Cultural diversity
• Status of children within the classroom
• Teach...
Principles : Supporting the needs of displaced
learners
www.britishcouncil.org 7
Celebrate diversity and find similarities...
Principles of classroom material design
• Focus on the students’ home languages /
languages of instructions;
• Link to the...
Language awareness: Plurilinguistic portraits
www.britishcouncil.org 9
Sociograms
www.britishcouncil.org 10
Haiti
New York
Monitoring and evaluation
www.britishcouncil.org
11
Key concepts:
• Continuous/cyclical
• Qualitative
• Analytic
• Wide sp...
www.britishcouncil.org 12
Monitoring and evaluation cycle
Needs
Analysis
Findings
Design
TrainingFeedback
Review /
Revise
...
Results
Marginalisation
“Well it was really interesting. They (the Syrians) don’t feel anymore bits and pieces
in our clas...
References
Billiez, J. et Millet, A. (2001). Représentations sociales : trajets
théoriques et méthodologiques. In Moore, D...
Anne.wiseman@britishcouncil.org
www.britishcouncil.org 15
www.britishcouncil.org 16
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Inclusion and access within crisis situations: how can Lebanese multilingual (and multicultural) classrooms be inclusive and accessible?

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Presentation by Anne Wiseman at the Education and Migration: Language Foregrounded conference at Durham University 21-23 October 2016, part of the AHRC funded Researching Multilingually at the Borders of Language, the Body, Law and the State project.

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Inclusion and access within crisis situations: how can Lebanese multilingual (and multicultural) classrooms be inclusive and accessible?

  1. 1. Inclusion and access within crisis situations: how can Lebanese multilingual (and multicultural) classrooms be inclusive and accessible? Anne Wiseman: Manager ‘Accessing Education’ Project for Syrian Refugees
  2. 2. Questions Policy Makers How can we meet the challenges of providing quality education in a emergency situation? • Integrate 60,000 Syrian refugees into Lebanese state schools within a short time. Practitioners How can sociolinguistic and pluralistic approaches help practitioners deal with diverse sociolinguistic profiles in their classrooms? www.britishcouncil.org 2
  3. 3. Findings: Student Profiles www.britishcouncil.org 3
  4. 4. • Profile 1: Students enrolled in Arabic language schools (some with limited French or English instruction). • Profile 2: Bedouin nomads who do not see the benefits of regular education in relation to their livelihood. • Profile 3: Bedouin sedentary students enrolled in schools. • Profile 4: Students in privileged areas enrolled in urban and rural schools with access to regular education. • Profile 5: Students in underprivileged and rural areas enrolled in seasonal schools. (Students are obliged to assist their parents in agricultural labour. Syrian schools adapted their schedule according to these key times throughout the year). • Profile 6: Students not in school for the past 1-3 years. • Profile 7: Kurdish students from different regions. Some enrolled in Kurdish language schools. www.britishcouncil.org 4
  5. 5. Theoretical underpinnings Sociolinguistic approach (framework - Louise Dabène: 1998) • Changing attitudes: perceptions and language security Training course design • Language Awareness (Hawkins: 1994) • Plurilinguistic approaches activities (CARAP Framework: 2007) • Pedagogy of the Other • Autonomous Learning • Life Skills www.britishcouncil.org 5
  6. 6. Some of the issues /barriers • Linguistic diversity • Cultural diversity • Status of children within the classroom • Teachers’ awareness of issues multilingual classrooms • Teachers’ awareness of issues in multicultural classrooms • Teachers’ competencies • Parents’ involvement: language abilities , attitudes to education www.britishcouncil.org 6
  7. 7. Principles : Supporting the needs of displaced learners www.britishcouncil.org 7 Celebrate diversity and find similarities • Building empathy • Telling our story - hearing others • Social skills development • Learning to learn skills - listening • Overcoming teacher stress • Working with parents, carers, communities • Working with creative arts - fun and play
  8. 8. Principles of classroom material design • Focus on the students’ home languages / languages of instructions; • Link to the students’ communities’ values; • Inclusiveness; • Celebrate diversity in the classroom • Share diversity in the classroom • Listen to others’ stories www.britishcouncil.org 8
  9. 9. Language awareness: Plurilinguistic portraits www.britishcouncil.org 9
  10. 10. Sociograms www.britishcouncil.org 10 Haiti New York
  11. 11. Monitoring and evaluation www.britishcouncil.org 11 Key concepts: • Continuous/cyclical • Qualitative • Analytic • Wide spread of data to ensure triangulation • Long term focused studies to capture individual changes Data collection • Questionnaires (before and after) • Focus group and individual Interviews (recorded and transcribed) • Before and after video footage used for observation analysis ( focussed) • Qualitative data analysis (Masters students) www.britishcouncil.org
  12. 12. www.britishcouncil.org 12 Monitoring and evaluation cycle Needs Analysis Findings Design TrainingFeedback Review / Revise Training Deliver Training Students Teachers Teacher Trainers Advisers Policy Makers
  13. 13. Results Marginalisation “Well it was really interesting. They (the Syrians) don’t feel anymore bits and pieces in our classes so the activities here helped them to have place in this big world.” (Adviser) Language Exposure “I was introduced …to many concepts mainly the sociolinguistics - it’s something new and also we have the language awareness… it is a key to teach student s…who are exposed to media, to internet. Changing the problem into a solution it is just like a key to teach them.” (Trainer) Diversity “Till now when we talk about languages teachers dealing with languages as material the student should learn… They talk about culture but they never think about diversity or they never think about accepting the other.” (Trainer) www.britishcouncil.org 13
  14. 14. References Billiez, J. et Millet, A. (2001). Représentations sociales : trajets théoriques et méthodologiques. In Moore, D. (ed), Les représentations des langues et de leur apprentissage, références, modèles, données et méthodes, Paris: Didier. Council of Europe (2007). Framework of Reference for Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Cultures. European Centre for Modern Languages Further reading on research undertaken with Lebanese teachers Grappe, I.(2002). Apprentissage/multilinguisme et identité (unpublished MA thesis), Université Stendhal, Grenoble 3, France. Grappe, I. (2010) Conception et évaluation d’une Formation de formateurs au français sur objectifs spécifiques à partir d’une approche sociolinguistique , unpublished thesis , Université de Grenoble. www.britishcouncil.org 14
  15. 15. Anne.wiseman@britishcouncil.org www.britishcouncil.org 15
  16. 16. www.britishcouncil.org 16

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