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CARBON FOOTPRINT.pptx

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CARBON FOOTPRINT.pptx

  1. 1. CARBON FOOT PRINT
  2. 2. What is Carbon Footprint? • A carbon footprint is the total amount of greenhouse gas emissions that come from the production, use and end-of-life of a product or service. • It includes carbon dioxide (the gas most commonly emitted by humans) and others, including methane, nitrous oxide, and fluorinated gases, which trap heat in the atmosphere, causing global warming. • Greenhouse gases, including the carbon-containing gases carbon dioxide and methane, can be emitted through the burning of fossil fuels (energy and transportation sector), land clearance for production of food, industrial emissions for manufacture of goods, infrastructural development. • Usually, the bulk of an individual’s carbon footprint will come from transportation, housing and food.
  3. 3. Origin of the concept • The carbon footprint concept is related to and grew out of the older idea of ecological footprint, a concept invented in the early 1990s by ecologists at the University of British Columbia. • An ecological footprint is the total area of land required to sustain an activity or population. It includes environmental impacts, such as water use and the amount of land used for food production. • In contrast, a carbon footprint is usually expressed as a measure of weight, as in tons of CO2 or equivalent CO2.
  4. 4. Who has the biggest carbon footprint? Top polluters • China, with more than 10,065 million tons of CO2. • United States, with 5,416 million tons of CO2. • India, with 2,654 million tons of CO2. • Russia, with 1,711 million tons of CO2. • Japan, 1,162 million tons of CO2. • Germany, 759 million tons of CO2. • Iran, 720 million tons of CO2.
  5. 5. Carbon Footprint Calculation Direct Carbon Emissions Carbon emissions come from sources that are directly from the site that is producing a product or delivering a service Indirect Carbon Emissions Carbon emissions are emissions from sources upstream or Downstream from the process being studied Examples of upstream, indirect carbon emissions may include: • Transportation of materials/fuels • Any energy used outside of the production facility • Wastes produced outside of the production facility Examples of downstream, indirect carbon emissions may include: • Any end-of-life process or treatments • Product and waste transportation • Emissions associated with selling the product USEPA Carbon Footprint Calculator https://www3.epa.gov/carbon-footprint-calculator/
  6. 6. Methods to Reduce Carbon Footprint • Incorporating technologies in various sectors, viz., energy, industrial, agricultural and transportation to facilitate energy efficiency • Switching to renewable sources of energy • Use of electric motor vehicles, use of public transport • Changing lifestyles (food consumption) and purchasing habits (oriented to minimize waste) • Reduce, reuse and recycle waste. • Developing carbon sinks (forest, oceans, landmass that can absorb carbon emissions)
  7. 7. Carbon Neutrality and Net Zero • Carbon Neutrality means to remove the equivalent amount of CO2 to is emitted through activities across the supply chains, by investing in ‘carbon sinks’ that absorb CO2. • As per Paris Agreement (2015) Carbon Neutrality is to be achieved by 2050 to mitigate the effects of climate change. • To achieve NET ZERO means to go beyond the removal of just carbon emissions. Net zero refers to all greenhouse gases being emitted into the atmosphere, such as methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and other hydrofluorocarbons. • As with carbon neutrality, to reach net zero the greenhouse gases emitted into the atmosphere must be equivalent to the greenhouse gases being removed from the atmosphere.
  8. 8. Carbon Credits • A carbon credit is a generic term for any tradable certificate or permit representing the right to emit a set amount of carbon dioxide or the equivalent amount of a different greenhouse gas. • One credit permits the emission of one ton of carbon dioxide or the equivalent in other greenhouse gases. • The credits awarded to an industry decreases with time, thereby promoting the industries to adopt to methods that results in lesser carbon emissions.

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