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Basel Convention.pptx

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Basel Convention.pptx

  1. 1. WHAT IS BASEL CONVENTION? • Adopted on March 22, 1989 by the Conference of Plenipotentiaries in Basel, Switzerland, the “Basel Convention on the Control of Trans-boundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal”, generally known as the Basel Convention, came into force in September 1992. • The Basel Convention regulates the trans-boundary movements of hazardous wastes and other wastes and obliges its Parties to ensure that such wastes are managed and disposed of in an environmentally sound manner. • The Convention covers toxic, poisonous, explosive, corrosive, flammable, eco-toxic and infectious wastes. • The primary focus of the Basel Convention is on preventing the transfer of hazardous waste from developed to less developed countries and reducing the movement of hazardous waste between nations. • However, this convention does not control the movement of radioactive waste.
  2. 2. What Prompted Basel Convention? • The Khian Sea waste disposal incident (1986), in which a ship carrying incinerator ash from the American city of Philadelphia dropped its load on a Haitian beach (Atlantic) and remaining in Indian Ocean was one of the events that prompted the Basel Convention. • It was in response to a public outcry following the discovery of toxic waste deposits imported from developed nations to Africa and other developing countries in the 1980s.
  3. 3. Provisions of Basel Convention • the reduction of hazardous waste generation and the promotion of environmentally sound management of hazardous wastes, wherever the place of disposal; • the restriction of trans-boundary movements of hazardous wastes except where it is perceived to be in accordance with the principles of environmentally sound management; and • a regulatory system applying to cases where trans- boundary movements are permissible.
  4. 4. Some of the examples of waste that are considered hazardous under the scope of the Basel Convention: • Consumed or exhausted lead-acid batteries • All Biomedical wastes • Explosive wastes and Utilized Oils • Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) compounds • Heat exchange fluids, paint extract, sealants, copy papers free from carbon and used plastics. • Harmful chemicals and insecticides persist in the environment for years. • Including chemical wastes generated by industries and consumers. • Electronic and Electrical waste • Ships intended for dismantling • Mercury wastes
  5. 5. Basel Convention Member Countries 190 countries of the world are members of the Basel Convention, including India. The Basel Convention was signed by India in June 1992, and it went into effect on September 22, 1992.
  6. 6. • 15th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Basel Convention was on , 26 to 30 July 2021 (online segment) and Geneva, Switzerland, from 6 to 17 June 2022 (face-to- face segment) • Motto: "Global Agreements for a Healthy Planet: Sound management of chemicals and waste". http://www.basel.int/Home/tabid/2202/Default.aspx
  7. 7. Basel Convention - Basel Ban Amendment • The Basel Ban Amendment is an agreement made by Basel Convention Parties that forbids the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the European Union (EU), and Liechtenstein from exporting hazardous wastes as defined by the Convention to other nations, mainly developing or transitional economies. • Most flammable liquids, most electronic debris, most outmoded ships, most persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and most dangerous heavy metals are all included by the Ban Amendment. • Plastic, scrap metal, and paper waste won't likely be included unless they are polluted with or include hazardous waste or materials.

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