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PROGRESSIVISM.pptx

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PROGRESSIVISM.pptx

  1. 1. Progressive Thinkers : Its Role and Importance Reporter: RIA A. MICOR –PhD Management Course: Advanced Philosophy in Education Professor: DR. REYNALDO FRANCISCO JR.
  2. 2. People who are progressive favor reform and civil liberties: this is the opposite of conservative, and means something close to liberal. Progressive people are interested in change and progress. You're a progressive thinker if you like to think up new ways of doing things and you're open to change.
  3. 3. Progressivists believe that individuality, progress, and change are fundamental to one's education. Believing that people learn best from what they consider most relevant to their lives, progressivists center their curricula on the needs, experiences, interests, and abilities of students. Progressivist teachers try making school interesting and useful by planning lessons that provoke curiosity. In a progressivist school, students are actively learning. The students interact with one another and develop social qualities such as cooperation and tolerance for different points of view. In addition, students solve problems in the classroom similar to those they will encounter in their everyday lives. Progressivists believe that education should be a process of ongoing growth, not just a preparation for becoming an adult. An obvious example of progressivism would be our class. We are in groups a lot and we actively learn through discussion. We talk about how what we read can be incorporated into our future teaching careers.
  4. 4. He wanted students to learn through action and being involved in the processes that will get to the end product. He wanted the students to work on hands-on projects so learning would take place, rather than memorization. In a regular classroom students just memorize what they need to know and it goes away after the test.
  5. 5. In Dewey’s mind, the students would have to exercise their brain by problem solving and thinking critically, resulting in learning (even though the students may not even know it!). This allows the individual's brain to develop, so as the individual grows learning becomes easier! After attending a school Dewey would have set up, a child would be ready for the real world and a lot of the everyday setbacks that an individual would experience, such as losing a button, changing a tire, making lunch, or balancing a checkbook. School would be a lot of hands-on learning, and the progression of education would not end!
  6. 6. Today most K–12 teachers still believe in content, competition, evaluation, and discipline. Simultaneously, they believe in relevance, projects, group learning, and choice. The Common Core Standards, approved by most states, stress rigor but at the same time emphasize inquiry and understanding. John Dewey would be moderately pleased with a pragmatic nation that combines traditional education with the insights of progressives.
  7. 7. One of the benefits of progressive education is that teachers recognize and honor the creativity and passions of individual students. Educators do not simply teach students information and expect them to memorize it and get perfect scores on tests. Progressivism in education today helps students master a couple of important skills needed once they pursue their careers. Students learn to cooperate with teams, think critically before doing things, and use creative means to resolve problems. Kids also need to learn to contribute independently. Progressivists believe that individuality, progress, and change are fundamental to one's education. Believing that people learn best from what they consider most relevant to their lives, progressivists center their curricula on the needs, experiences, interests, and abilities of students.
  8. 8. I believe that education is the fundamental method of social progress and reform.” —John Dewey

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