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Building and Managing Online Communities

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International Congress of Archives Workshop 24 August 2012

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Building and Managing Online Communities

  1. 1. BUILDING AND MANAGING ONLINE COMMUNITIESA case study: Australian Newspapers and Trove International Congress of Archives Web 2.0 Workshop, Brisbane 24 August 2012 Presenter: Rose Holley roseholley@naa.gov.au
  2. 2. Overview National Library of Australia • Australian Newspapers Service 2007- 2010 • Trove single discovery service 2010-2012 Presentation focuses on user engagement and online community2
  3. 3. 2007 http://www.nla.gov.au/ndp 33
  4. 4. National Program and Content• Initial focus on major titles from each state and territory Northern Territory Times• ‘Regional’ titles contributed by libraries 2010 onwards Courier Mail• Coverage: West Australian Sydney Morning Herald Advertiser Sydney Gazette published between Canberra Times 1803 – 1954 - 1984 Argus• 7 million pages = 70 million articles Mercury 4
  5. 5. Newspapers 1803 to 19545 5
  6. 6. Australian Women’s Weekly 1932- 19826
  7. 7. Mass Digitisation:Hard copy and microfilm 7
  8. 8. 8 8
  9. 9. Building National Infrastructure • Storage • Newspaper Content Management system (digitisation workflow) • Panel of digitisation contractors (mass digi) • Quality assurance processes and team • Public delivery system9
  10. 10. Articles go into public beta system10
  11. 11. Text correction - testing user engagement 1111
  12. 12. Greatest fears! • No one will do it OR • People will deliberately vandalise the text. Questions? • Moderation? • Login? • Integration of user data?12
  13. 13. Fix text – power edit mode 1313
  14. 14. Show all corrections 14
  15. 15. Interaction at article level 1515
  16. 16. Add a tag ‘titanic sinking’ 1616
  17. 17. 1717
  18. 18. Add a comment 1818
  19. 19. After enhancements 1919
  20. 20. Public feedback on the feature ‘OCR text correction is great! I think I just found my new hobby!’ ‘It’s looking like it will be very cool and the text fixing and tagging is quite addictive.’ ‘An interesting way of using interested readers “labour”! I really like it.’ ‘A wonderful tool - the amount of user control is very surprising but refreshing.’ ‘I applaud the capability for readers to correct the text.’20
  21. 21. Why do it? • I love it • It’s interesting and fun • It is a worthy cause • It’s addictive • I am helping with something important e.g. recording history, finding new things • I want to do some voluntary work • I want to help non-profit making organisations like libraries • I want to learn something • It’s a challenge • I want to give something back to the community21 • You trust me to do it so I’ll do it
  22. 22. “Who are the text correctors?” 22Flickr: LucLeqay
  23. 23. User base
  24. 24. 757,716 lines improved 24
  25. 25. 25
  26. 26. Don’t stop correcting! 26
  27. 27. Achievements Aug 2012 (4 yrs since release)  60,000+ volunteer text correctors  92 million lines of text corrected in 4 million articles  1.6 million tags added  45,500 comments added  4 million users  70 million articles27
  28. 28. 92 million lines corrected Aug 2012 Lines corrected millions100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Dec-08 Dec-09 Dec-10 Dec-11 Aug-12
  29. 29. Build on success – create Trove • Same infrastructure and principles • Digital AND non digital • Australian Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums (GLAM) • Full-text (books, newspapers) GOOGLE • User-generated content Flickr, YouTube,29 Wikipedia
  30. 30. NLA Strategic Directions 2009 “We will explore new models for creating and sharing information and for collecting materials, including supporting the creation of knowledge by our users. “ (not just NLA resources… all Australian content) “The changing expectations of users that they will not be passive receivers of information, but rather contributors and participants in information services.”30
  31. 31. Trove Strategy 2010 -2012 Grow Content Develop Service Engage with community Promote31
  32. 32. Single searchRestrictsearchbrowsezones 32
  33. 33. Refine/limit search results Groups results in zonesUse API’s forWikipedia, Get itemAmazon, Googlevideo… 33
  34. 34. Features Tag, comment, list, send link to, cite, check copyright34
  35. 35. 35
  36. 36. Text correctors - Hall of Fame36
  37. 37. User Profile –activity and ranking37
  38. 38. Alerting to new content38
  39. 39. ‘Lists’ to record your finds and add notes39
  40. 40. Wikipedia interactions40
  41. 41. 41
  42. 42. Wikipedia citation style42
  43. 43. Lionel Logue – The King’s Speech43
  44. 44. Wikipedia links to Trove sources44
  45. 45. User Forum45
  46. 46. Feedback Christmas Day 2010 3000 comments and feedback received in 201046
  47. 47. User generated content: photos http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37255844 By Nomad Tales47
  48. 48. Family photos – identify people http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37288101 Flexigel48
  49. 49. 49
  50. 50. Institutional list for virtual exhibs50
  51. 51. Educators List – Teaching aid51
  52. 52. Re- purposing information and sharing Blog using newspaper articles http://lynnwalsh.wordpress.com52
  53. 53. Trove Blog53
  54. 54. Trove Tweets54
  55. 55. New Years Eve 201055
  56. 56. Public raise money for digitisation 56
  57. 57. Rockhampton ‘Trovers’57
  58. 58. Brisbane Floods – 2011, 1974,1893
  59. 59. http://climatehistory.com.au This landmark project, spanning the sciences and the humanities, draws together a team of leading climate scientists, water managers and historians to better understand south- eastern Australian climate history over the past 200–500 years. It is the first study of its kind in Australia.59
  60. 60. Media Coveragehttp://www.abc.net.au/news/video/2010/04/29/2885984.htm 60
  61. 61. Trove screencasting on YouTube62
  62. 62. Trove promotional video63
  63. 63. Being in the club
  64. 64. Monitoring activity in an average day7,0006,0005,0004,0003,0002,0001,000 0 1am 4am 7am 10am 1pm 4pm 7pm 10pm Pageviews (mirrors searching and text correction activity) August 2010: Searching peaks at 11,000 per hour, text correction at 9,000 lines per hour, average number of unique users per day is 10,000.
  65. 65. Search phrase Wordle Jan 201166
  66. 66. Ravelry – vintage knitting patterns
  67. 67. NOVEL IDEAS“The earliest novel that I collected was The Misers Daughter by William Harrison Ainsworth. It was serialised in The Colonial Times, Hobart starting in Aug. 1842. It is enjoyable being able to read a story while doing the text correction. The added bonus is being able to put them online in e-book format for others to read. The process is quite time- consuming and can take longer than the original newspaper text-correcting, but it is very rewarding. So far I have managed to create 105 e-books from the newspaper text in the last 18 months. I upload the e-books to Project Gutenberg Australia. I found recently that some of the stories that we have uploaded have since been copied by some other websites and set up in different file formats. Some of the stories have even been put onto Amazon.com.”
  68. 68. 14 Keys to success for crowdsourcing1. Clear and big goal on homepage2. Progress towards goal is visible3. Site is quick and reliable4. Activity easy and fun5. Results/outcome visible6. Simple rewards and acknowledgements given7. Content or topic is interesting (history, science, animals, personal)
  69. 69. 8. Volunteer profiles are open and visible9. Volunteers have an online team environment e.g. wiki, forum10. Volunteers have choices on how to work11. We assume work will be done well and volunteers can be trusted12. The site is alive with new content13. Site owner listens to ‘super’ volunteers carefully14. Topical/news events are used to your advantage
  70. 70. Management of the crowd• Volunteers largely manage each other• Make their activity transparent to everyone• Be IT savvy use – forums, blogs, wiki’s to help• Make it easy for volunteers to contact you direct if they see an issue.• ‘Shepherd’ rather than manage volunteers – can be done an hour a week.
  71. 71. The Crowd • Once content is liberated anyone can become a ‘researcher’. • The ‘ivory tower’ of gated and protected knowledge is gone. • ‘Formal’ scholars are replaced by the crowd in the cloud. • Today’s public are educated and engaged, demonstrated by their participation in citizen science projects.73
  72. 72. Expectations of online users“Self service, satisfaction and seamlessness are definitive of information seekers expectations. Ease of use, convenience and availability are equally as important to information seekers as information quality and trustworthiness.”2003 OCLC Environmental ScanTo interact with content,other users and theorganisation (web 2.0)To be able to annotate contentand contribute their own 74
  73. 73. Important Things • Connections • Sharing • Linkages • Re-purposing • Related • Mashing • Context • Adding Giving users • Access to resources • Tools to do stuff • Freedom and choices • Ways to work collaboratively75 together
  74. 74. Where are the walls? There are no walls only bridges: • People outside your building are accessing information within it. • People inside your building are accessing information from outside. • Changing use of spaces.76
  75. 75. Power vs Freedom “Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.” Harriet Rubin Rose says: We are gatekeepers who need to focus on opening rather than closing doors….We need to change institutional thinking.77
  76. 76. Thank you!http://www.snotr.com/video/8965/

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