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Managing drought and water scarcity: evidence from social research in the Awash River basin

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REACH Conference on Water Security and Poverty
breakout: Managing climate resilience
Thursday 28 March | 11:00-12:30
Presenter: Dr. Catherine Grasham, University of Oxford

Published in: Environment
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Managing drought and water scarcity: evidence from social research in the Awash River basin

  1. 1. Managing drought and water scarcity: evidence from social research in the Awash River basin Dr Catherine Fallon Grasham, University of Oxford catherine.grasham@ouce.ox.ac.uk
  2. 2. REACH Water Security and Poverty Conference 27-29 March | Keble College, Oxford SOCIAL RESEARCH RATIONALE • 3 SELECTED WOREDAS – Upper – Middle – Lower • DIFFERENT LIVELIHOOD AND AGROECOLOGICAL ZONES • COLLECT RISK PERCEPTIONS • EXPLORE RISK MANAGEMENT Bora Fentale Dubti Stakeholders Urban and rural communities Industrial water users
  3. 3. REACH Water Security and Poverty Conference 27-29 March | Keble College, Oxford 2015 DROUGHT RESPONSE • STRONG FOOD SECURITY RESPONSE – 10 million people were in need of food aid due to the 2015/16 El Niño event (WFP, 2016) – Research participants across the basin reporting sufficient access to food during 2015 drought – PSNP contributor to drought resilience (8 million beneficiaries in 2015)
  4. 4. REACH Water Security and Poverty Conference 27-29 March | Keble College, Oxford BRIDGING DISCONNECTS FOR DROUGHT RISK PREVENTION • POLICY AND PRACTICE – E.g. enforcing drought year water allocation plans • SECTORS – E.g. Disaster Risk Management and Water Resources Management • SCALES – E.g. Federal and regional Drought Risks Health Income Loss of assets Education
  5. 5. REACH Water Security and Poverty Conference 27-29 March | Keble College, Oxford URBAN WATER SUPPLIES FOR RESILIENT COMMUNITIES • LIVELIHOODS – Urban industry, small and medium enterprises, urban agriculture, household enterprise activities • LIVESTOCK – Drink from rural and urban water supplies • LARGE INDUSTRIAL WATER USERS – Using urban water supplies for production; even those outside of urban areas with their own boreholes for water for production were usually trucking in water for drinking from the local town for their employees. • PROXIMAL RURAL COMMUNITIES – Urban water supplies are often better quality and more reliable – routinely accessed by rural dwellers
  6. 6. REACH Water Security and Poverty Conference 27-29 March | Keble College, Oxford OPPORTUNITIES FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCE WITH URBAN WATER SUPPLY MANAGEMENT • URBAN WATER USE – Understanding multiple uses and unanticipated human behaviour • DROUGHT AND DRY SEASON DEMAND INCREASES – All three woredas reported trucking water into rural areas from urban water supplies at times of drought/severe water scarcity – From livestock when other sources dry up • ENERGY SOURCE – Electricity interruptions, lack of access to/affordability of gasoline
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