Institutional Policy #openls 2014

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Institutional Policy 2014 OpenEd Leadership Summit June 4-6

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Institutional Policy #openls 2014

  1. 1. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   OPEN EDUCATION leadership summit 2014 Ins:tu:onal  Policy   Workshop  Presenta:on   Group  Leader:  Daniel  DeMarte   Group  Facilitator:  Julie  Cur:s  (@juliekcur:s)  
  2. 2. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   Summary  of  Issues   ●  Vision   ●  Purpose   ●  Barriers   ●  Give  shape  to  faculty  about  rules  for  engaging  in  OER   ●  OER  as  solu:on  for  military  students   ●  Legal  counsel  -­‐  when  do  we  need  legal  review   ●  Ownership/licensing   ●  Strategy   ●  What  can  be  addressed  by  policy?  (and  what  can’t?)   ●  Intersec:on  of  culture  and  policy   ●  Ecosystem  
  3. 3. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   What  Said  We  Would  Focus  On   Assump9on:  There  are  different  states  or  categories  of  ac:vity  associated  with  OER,   depending  on  what  you’re  trying  to  accomplish  as  an  organiza:on:   ●  Adapt     ●  Adopt   ●  Build     Capture:  What  policy  and  culture-­‐related  issues,  challenges,  opportuni:es,  pi^alls,   experiences  apply  to  each  state  of  OER  ac:vity?     Summit  Output:  Framework  of  policy  issues  and  what  to  pay  a`en:on  to  at  each  state   and  reference  materials     Eventual  Goal:  Build  out  this  framework  with  addi:onal  reference  materials,  case   studies,  etc.          
  4. 4. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   What  Actually  Happened   Different  types  of  ins:tu:ons   Different  levels  of  OER  ac:vity   Different  organiza:onal  goals   +    Different  organiza:onal  cultures     No  One-­‐Size-­‐Fits-­‐All  Policy  Discussion              
  5. 5. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   Revised  Approach   ●  Capture  issues,  insights,  experiences  around  hot   bu`on  areas  of  OER-­‐related  policy  and  prac:ce   ●  Build  out  a  statement  of  principles  about  the  role  of   OER  in  higher  educa:on   o  Elaborate  on  Daniel’s  “Purposes  of  OER”  material    
  6. 6. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   Policy  Areas   •  Defining  vision  &  purpose   •  Defining  desired  outcomes   •  Securing  stakeholder  support   •  Crea:ng  a  policy  ecosystem  to  support  open   •  Incorpora:ng  OER  into  exis:ng  policy  /  process   •  Cultural  shig  to  encourage  recep:vity   •  Faculty  professional  development   •  Intellectual  property  /  copyright   •  Quality  assurance   •  The  dance  of  policy  and  culture  
  7. 7. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   Purpose  Statement  for  OER  Advocacy   3     See  Google  Doc:  Purpose  Statement  for  OER      
  8. 8. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   Proposed  Work  Products  &  Resources   6   Concept   Descrip:on   Open  Policy  Case  Study  “Toolkit”   Compile  useful  set  of  case  studies  about  various  dimensions  of  OER   policy.  Highlight  What  worked?  What  didn’t?  Why  not.     Intellectual  Property  Policy   Handbook   Have  boilerplate  language  at  my  disposal:  1)  both  par:es  have  non-­‐ exclusive;  2)  both  par:es  have  non-­‐exclusive  and  faculty  member  can   put  a  CC  license.  Handbook  for  if/then  approaches.  Add  examples   and  principles  each  one  inflected.   Policy  Framework  /  Guide   Develop  framework  of  issues  for  thinking  about  policy  regarding   Open.  Iden:fy  available  resources  to  guide  and  inform  policy  work,   and  compile  them  into  a  policy  guide.     OER  Statement  of  Purpose     “Touchstone”  resource  for  developing  vision,  policy,  advocacy   efforts,  etc.    
  9. 9. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   Next  Steps   ●  Con9nue  discussion  about  policy:  Define  key  issues,   opportuni:es  to  con:nue  dialogue  and   collabora:on   ●  Collabora9ve  ini9a9ve:  Military-­‐serving  ins:tu:ons   &  DOD  restric:ons  on  spending  federal  $  on   textbooks   o  Interested:  SPARC,  Crea:ve  Commons,  Pierce  College,   UMD,  Tidewater,  others   7  
  10. 10. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   Discussion  +  Q&A   ●  Comments?   ●  Ques:ons?   ●  What  did  we  miss?   ●  What  would  you  add?   ●  Direc:ons  for  further  explora:on?   8  
  11. 11. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Defining  Vision  &  Purpose   5   Discussion  Output   Lessons  &  Insights:     ●  Essen:al  star:ng  point:  Define  what  are  you  trying  to  do  and  let  this  dictate  vision  and   purpose.   ●  Students  will  always  care  most  about  reducing  textbook  cost.   ●  Don’t  let  current  business  model  dictate  what  approach  you  take  to  innova:on  and  OER.   Old  business  model  (like  bookstore)  shouldn’t  hold  this  up     Examples  of  What  Works:   ●  Cerritos  College  &  Mercy  College:  Use  a  three  step  process  in  defining  purpose  and   evangelizing  ac:vity:  1)  emphasize  reducing  textbook  cost;  2)  OER  as  a  solu:on;  3)   academic  innova:on  made  possible  with  OER   ●  Washington  SBCTC:  Galvanize  ac:on  with  a  visionary  leader  (Cable  Green)  to  establish  a   common  vision  across  administra:on  for  everyone  to  align  around   ●  Tidewater:  Ini:al  white  paper  to  govern  approach  
  12. 12. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Defining  Desired  Outcomes   5   Discussion  Output   Lessons  &  Insights   ●  Important  to  set  goals  and  measure  results  from  OER.     ●  OER  should  support  the  ins:tu:onal  mission,  goals  and  metrics  you  already  care  about.       Examples  of  What  Works   ●  Tidewater:  How  to  think  about  ini:al  policy  framework  to  support  OER  ini:a:ves:     ○  Stage  1)Is  this  possible  and  how  do  we  prove  the  concept?  What  policy  is  needed  to   support  and  protect  faculty  and  the  ins:tu:on?  Once  you  prove  the  concept,  move  to     ○  Stage  2)  How  do  we  ins:tu:onalize  it  and  what  policies  are  needed  to  make  it   ins:tu:onal?       ○  Acknowledge  con:nuous  improvement  process  from  the  beginning.   ●  Crea9ve  Commons:    Ar:culate  the  metrics  and  outcomes  you  care  about,  and  then  define   an  OER  vision  and  approach  to  align  with  what  you  already  measure  and  care  about.    
  13. 13. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Securing  Stakeholder  Support     5   Discussion  Output   Challenges     ●  How  do  we  navigate  the  path  between  fostering  grassroots  support  vs.  admin/execu:ve  support?   Where  to  start?   ●  Who  do  you  start  with?  Willing  faculty  vs.  execu:ve  champion?       Lessons  &  Insights     ●  Ins:tu:onal  Commitment:  Someone  at  the  budget  level  needs  to  put  resources  in  support  of  OER   (grants,  general  budget,  etc.)  Without  budget  it  won’t  progress.   ●  Case  studies  are  helpful  to  educate  about  what’s  possible.     ●  Sample  policies  are  helpful  to  inform  process  of  hammering  out  your  own  path.     ●  Funding  for  OER  alone  doesn’t  offer  sustainability.  You  also  have  to  create  commitment  to  what  comes   ager  funding  is  gone.   ●  Gain  ini:al  trac:on  trac:on  by  talking  about  reducing  textbook  costs  first,  not  OER  for  the  sake  of  OER       ●  It  needs  a  spark  to  get  started.  Eventually  you  need  stakeholders  around  the  table  who  can  represent   their  colleagues  and  bring  everyone  along,  including  budget  alignment.  Coordinate  and  bring  together   pockets  of  innova:on.   ●  Faculty  have  a  big  fear  factor  about  open,  puung  courses  out  for  others  to  cri:que,  etc.  Training  and   professional  development  help  them  overcome  the  fear  and  resistance.  
  14. 14. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Securing  Stakeholder  Support     5   Discussion  Output   Examples  of  What  Works   ●  VCCS:  Start  ini:a:ves  with  le`er  of  support  from  dean  /  dept  to  give  faculty  “coverage”  and  support   ●  Washington  SBCTC:  Don’t  treat  OER  as  just  a  one-­‐off  project  that  isn’t  sustainable.  Treat  it  as  core  to   what  you’re  about.  It  becomes  simply  part  of  how  the  organiza:on  operates,  and  needs  to  be  funded   accordingly:  OER  is  the  tool  of  the  day.  
  15. 15. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Crea9ng  a  Policy  Ecosystem  in  Support  of  Open   5   Discussion  Output   Lessons  &  Insights   ●  It  isn’t  just  about  “open”  policy.  It’s  about  how  all  policy  can  support  “open”  effec:vely.     ●  Apply  policy  appropriate  to  the  stage  of  “product  development”   ○  Early  stage:  Can  this  be  done?  Ini:al  experimenta:on  and  policy  to  encourage  innova:on     ○  Later  stage:  Ins:tu:onalize  success.  Steep  adop:on  and  policy  for  effec:ve  management  and   coordina:on     ●  Think  hard  about  carrots  vs.  s:cks.  Carrots  are  much  much  easier.  S:cks  cause  fights.   ●  Treat  OER  as  core  to  what  you’re  about,  not  just  a  one-­‐off  project.  Sustain  it  because  it  is  core  to  what   you  are.     ●  Look  at  policies  on  adjacent  programs  that  can  support  OER,  and  how  to  create  alignment.   ●  Apply  the  same  policies  across  the  board,  not  just  to  open.   ●  Level/type  of  adop:on  will  help  determine  appropriate  “policy”  pathway:  policy  around  what  Open  will   require  of  stakeholders.     ●  Need  to  work  carefully  through:  Does  “ins:tu:onal  policy”  mean  the  system?  the  campus?   departments?  faculty?  How  do  these  levels  of  policy  align  and  scale?     ●  Policy  needs  to  create  a  suppor:ve  environment  and  remove  obstacles:  awareness-­‐building,  training,   professional  development,  etc.       ●  Help  students  understand  clear  differences  between  “open”  and  “plagiarism”  
  16. 16. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Crea9ng  a  Policy  Ecosystem  in  Support  of  Open   5   Discussion  Output   Examples  of  What  Works   ●  Crea9ve  Commons:  Use  voluntary  measures  like  discre:onary  money  or  release  :me  to  create   voluntary  incen:ves  associated  with  open  and  simultaneously  eliminate  concerns  about  academic   freedom.   ●  Washington  SBCTC:  Write  OER  support  into  RFPs  for  learning  tools.  (See  SBCTC  technology  strategic   plan);  Faculty  learning  community  /  innova:on  grants  :ed  to  OER  one  year.     ●  Washington  SBCTC  /  Open  Library:  Establish  mul:ple  quality  “shields”  around  open  content  -­‐  501k   accessibility,  Quality  Ma`ers,  etc.  Use  OER  to  model  quality  for  all  courses.  
  17. 17. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Incorpora9ng  OER  into  Exis9ng  Policy/Prac9ce   5   Discussion  Output   Lessons  &  Insights     ●  Policies  don’t  operate  in  a  vacuum.  They  need  to  work  on  top  of  the  rest  of  the  fragile  policy  structure.     ●  How  can  you  adjust  a  variety  of  exis:ng  policies  to  support  and  remove  barriers  to  Open?       ○  Intellectual  Property  policy   ○  Promo:on  and  tenure  policy     Examples  of  What  Works   ●  Washington  SBCTC:  Align  peripheral  policies  and  prac:ces  around  support  of  OER:  how  can  we  support   OER  with  how  we  spend  various  pots  of  money?   ●  Crea9ve  Commons:  OER  carries  addi:onal  weight  in  promo:on/tenure  considera:on  (:ed  to   affordability,  publica:on  record,  etc.)  
  18. 18. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Cultural  ShiT  to  Encourage  Recep9vity   5   Discussion  Output   Lessons  &  Insights     ●  Frame  discussion  around  how  OER  benefits  faculty.  “Federal  funding  is  :ed  increasingly  to  open   licensing.  I  want  to  help  you  respond  successfully  to  this  changing  environment.”     Examples  of  What  Works   ●  Tidewater:  Academic  freedom  as  a  “carrot”  for  faculty  associated  with  OER.  Offer  OER  as  a  tool  or   op:on  to  have  much  more  academic  freedom.  Conversa:on  is  about  lots  of  available  resources,  in   addi:on  to  cost  savings.     ●  Cerritos:  Evangelize  cost  savings  benefits  of  OER  to  galvanize  student  demand;  use  this  to  create   momentum  in  other  parts  of  organiza:on.     ●  Washington  SBCTC:  Using  a  faculty  professional  development  course  about  OER;  training  opens  their   eyes  and  how  it  can  improve  their  teaching  prac:ce.  This  has  become  a  powerful  tool  to  shig  culture   and  build  awareness.   ●  Martha  Kanter,  Chancellor  at  Foothill-­‐De  Anza  Community  College:  Applied  a  variety  of  Carrot-­‐type   policies,  not  s:cks  
  19. 19. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Faculty  Professional  Development   5   Discussion  Output   Lessons  &  Insights     ●  Help  faculty  understand  how  tradi:onal  publishers  are  trying  to  reduce  access  to  knowledge  in  an  age   when  knowledge  is  abundant.     Examples  of  What  Works   ●  Washington  SBCTC:  Set  policy  around  training/professional  development.  Offer  a  professional   development  course  about  OER;  training  can  open  their  eyes  and  how  it  can  improve  their  teaching   prac:ce.  This  has  become  a  powerful  tool  to  shig  culture  and  build  awareness.     ●  Crea9ve  Commons:  Talk  to  faculty  about  how  if  their  library  stops  subscribing  to  a  journal  where  they   publish,  they  are  no  longer  en:tled  to  use  their  own  ar:cles  with  their  students  
  20. 20. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Intellectual  Property  /  Copyright   5   Discussion  Output   Challenges   ●  Are  ins:tu:ons  going  to  get  more  possessive  as  “courseware”  represents  value?  Get  more  concerned   about  giving  up  any  rights?   ●  Is  OER  more  like  journal  ar:cles  or  more  like  textbooks?  How  do  ins:tu:ons  dis:nguish  between  these   items?    Does  the  fact  that  ins:tu:ons  don’t  enforce  IP  with  textbooks  create  an  opening  for  how  to   deal  with  OER  IP?  Courseware,  course  notes,  etc.  are  more  ambiguous.     ●  Faculty  fear  that  ins:tu:on  will  fire  them  and  hire  adjuncts  using  their  course  materials     Lessons  &  Insights     ●  For  many  people,  this  is  not  clear.  Every  ins:tu:on  should  be  transparent  about  this:  Who  owns  what   when  someone  is  crea:ng  content.  There  is  a  legal  answer  and  a  cultural  answer,  not  always  the  same.     ●  Intellectual  Property  policies  become  an  opportunity  for  union/labor/working  environment  discussions.   People  have  to  feel  the  “carrot”  isn’t  in  some  other  trap  related  to  IP.   ●  It  is  in  the  interests  of  faculty  to  address  intellectual  proper:es  clearly  and  transparently.  
  21. 21. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Intellectual  Property  /  Copyright   5   Discussion  Output   Desired  Outcomes   ●  How  to  help  faculty  move  ahead  with  OER,  without  fear   ●  Don’t  believe  it’s  do-­‐about  to  redefine  IP.     ●  Would  like  to  see  addendum:  Colleges  s:ll  own  work,  but  allow  faculty  to  openly  license  with  colleges   as  the  copyright  holder.  College  acknowledge  as  copyright  holder,  but  give  freedom  to  faculty  to  openly   license  the  work.   ●  Define  copyright  to  allow  holders  to  reuse  content   ●  Put  system  in  place  where  faculty  can  request  open  licensing.       Ac9ons  We  Can  Take  to  Help  Resolve  Issues   ●  When  contracts  are  up  for  renewal,  make  amendments  to  contract.   ●  Develop  a  handbook:  Have  boilerplate  language  at  my  disposal:  1)  both  par:es  have  non-­‐exclusive;  2)   both  par:es  have  non-­‐exclusive  and  faculty  member  can  put  a  CC  license.  Handbook  for  if/then   approaches.  Add  exaamples  and  principles  each  one  inflected.          
  22. 22. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Intellectual  Property  /  Copyright   5   Discussion  Output   Examples  of  What  Works   ●  Crea9ve  Commons:  Amend  employment  contract  so  college  and  faculty  have  nonexclusive  rights  over   copyright.   ●  VCCS:  Shared,  non-­‐exclusive  copyright  is  the  spirit  of  VCCS  copyright  approach.  Reference:   h`p://cdn.vccs.edu/wp-­‐content/uploads/2013/07/sec12.pdf     ●  Utah  K12  System:  Adjust  copyright  to  be  more  open-­‐friendly.  Allow  open  license/sharing  on  instructors’   work  and  require  they  submit  content  for  review  before  sharing.     ●  Athabasca  University:  In  separate  discussions,  the  university  claimed  to  own  faculty  works  but  faculty   claimed  they  owned  their  own  works.  When  legal  contract  revealed  university  as  copyright  holder,   faculty  became  very  suppor:ve  of  open  licensing  and  the  university  became  more  concerned.  This  is   leading  to  produc:ve  discussion  and  movement.      
  23. 23. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Quality  Assurance   5   Discussion  Output   Lessons  and  Insights   ●  “Open”  alone  is  not  a  stamp  of  quality.     ●  Textbook  publisher’s  name  alone  is  not  a  stamp  of  quality.       Examples  of  What  Works   ●  Crea9ve  Commons  /  Washington  SBCTC:  Apply  consistent  policies  around  course/content  quality  to   open  and  proprietary  materials.  Example:  Invest  in  mul:ple  quality  “shields”  around  open  content  -­‐   501k  accessibility,  Quality  Ma`ers,  etc.  Use  OER  to  model  quality  for  all  courses.  
  24. 24. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Dance  of  Policy  and  Culture   5   Discussion  Output   Lessons  and  Insights   ●  Policy  may  not  be  needed  urgently  at  the  earliest  adop:on  stage  when  instead  it’s  important  to  seed   innova:on.     ●  As  things  progress,  policy  signals  support  and  endorsement:  OER  is  a  priority.   ●  Policy  is  needed  to  to  help  ins:tu:onalize  and  coordinate  the  innova:ons  you  want  to  build  successfully   into  how  you  operate.     ●  At  any  stage,  adop:on  and  use  of  OER  depends  on  making  it  “safe”  culturally   ●  When  policy  clashes  with  culture,  usually  policy  isn’t  enforced  or  followed.  Solu:on:  create  different   incen:ves  to  comply  with  policy.   ●  In  early  stages,  you’re  trying  to  change  culture.     ○  What  structure  is  helpful  at  beginning  stage  -­‐  what  is  commitment?  What  is  the  purpose?   ○  If  you  ins:tu:onalize  it  too  soon,  you  miss  out  on  some  of  the  posi:ve  “messiness”  of  innova:on   ○  You  won’t  know  what  supports  the  culture  un:l  you  see  some  of  that  innova:on  in  ac:on  
  25. 25. #openls  |  Portland  OR  4-­‐6  Jun  2014   POLICY  AREA   Dance  of  Policy  and  Culture   5   Discussion  Output   Examples  of  What  Works   ●  NIH  open  access  policy:  All  publica:ons  must  be  publicly  available    within  12  months  of  publica:on.  NIH   published  note  saying  they  take  it  seriously  and  likelihood  of  geung  addi:onal  grants  diminishes  if  you   don’t  comply.  Within  days,  compliance  went  from  35%  to  75%.  

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