You are the Umpire

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You are the Umpire Quiz for use with Qwizdom Classroom/Audience Response Systems.

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  • It is not your decision. The ball belongs to the home club. Permission must be obtained for the ball to be given away, because it's essential that used balls are kept as spares to be used for other matches in the event of a ball becoming unusable or being lost.
  • You are the Umpire

    1. 1. YOU ARE THE UMPIRE. A QWIZDOM QUIZ…
    2. 2. a. Bowler 1 b. Bowler 2 c. Not your Decision d. Both get a half each
    3. 3. b. It’s not your decision It is not your decision. The ball belongs to the home club. Permission must be obtained for the ball to be given away, because it's essential that used balls are kept as spares to be used for other matches in the event of a ball becoming unusable or being lost.
    4. 4. A. Out B. Timed Out
    5. 5. B. Timed Out First you must find out why no batsman has emerged. Leave the field and go into the batting side's dressing room to speak to the captain. Normally more than one batsman is padded up so, though the incoming batsman getting injured as he approaches the wicket is an exceptional circumstance, it is not necessarily an excuse for such a long delay. If you are not satisfied with the reason for the non-appearance, the next batsman who enters the field will be timed out if the other team appeal.
    6. 6. A. Out B. Run
    7. 7. A. Out Out. This is a very unfortunate incident but he's run out on appeal. The ball colliding with the bat is entirely coincidental and, unless the fielding captain was very generous and withdrew the appeal, the unlucky batsman would have to go.
    8. 8. Choose all that apply A. Leg Bye B. No Ball C. Four Runs
    9. 9. A, B & C First signal no ball, then the signal for a leg bye and then for four runs. The leg bye signal is specifically to inform the scorers that the runs are not credited to the striker. Each signal must be individually acknowledged by the scorers and you should never restart play until all your signals have been acknowledged.
    10. 10. A. Give a Reprieve B. Give Him Out
    11. 11. B. Give Him Out He's out, lbw. When the bowler starts his run up, whatever stance the batsman is in determines off side and leg side. The fact that he switched stance during the bowler's approach makes no difference.
    12. 12. A.4 B.6 C. Caught Out
    13. 13. B.6 Six runs. Any ball that lands from the bat on, or over, the boundary rope or fence is counted as a six. Though with the boundary rope usually at least 50 yards away, you'd have to be sure that the ball landed exactly on top of it.
    14. 14. A. Not Out B. Out
    15. 15. B. Out Out – hit wicket. It may not sound like an entirely likely scenario, but you'd be surprised what happens at lower levels of cricket, so umpires always need to be ready to react to unexpected or bizarre incidents in a calm and rational way. In this situation, the false teeth are treated as a part of his person, the same as if he'd trodden on the wicket while playing a stroke, or if his cap had broken the wicket.
    16. 16. A. Out B. Not Out
    17. 17. A. Out Out. If he leaves the field of play without being dismissed or injured he is ruled to be "retired out". A batsman can't just walk off the field and return to bat when it suits him. Early in the season in non-championship matches against the universities, county batsmen who've made big scores retire to give other batsmen match practice. In every instance they are recorded as retired out.
    18. 18. A. Out B. Not Out
    19. 19. A. Out Out, stumped. Interestingly, you would give the wicket here specifically because he was wearing a cap – had he been wearing a helmet the wicket would not have been awarded. Helmets are treated differently in the laws from caps and a wicket cannot be obtained from a direct deflection off a helmet for a catch. Equally, for stumpings and run-outs from a helmet deflection, there must be a further interception by a fielder.
    20. 20. 1, 2, or 3 Which of the three deliveries is legal?
    21. 21. 1. because part of the front foot is behind the popping crease Which of the three deliveries is legal?

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