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The Value of Healthcare is in the Eye of the Beholder
Key stakeholders disagree on a number of vital healthcare issues tha...
Lifestyle Choices Lead Impact on Health
It is widely understood that lifestyle choices have a significant impact on one’s ...
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The New Health Report 2011 - Backgrounder

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The New Health Report 2011 is a report based on a national survey of biopharmaceutical executives, managed care executives, physicians and patients living with chronic disease conducted by Richard Day Research of Evanston, Ill., on behalf of Quintiles Transnational Corp. Richard Day Research was responsible for all survey design, data analysis and data reporting. Data for this survey were collected between January 5 and February 27, 2011. Included in the sample were 200 biopharmaceutical executives at the director level or above, 153 managed care executives at the director level or above, 400 primary care physicians, 103 board-certified specialists, and 1,000 U.S. adults ages 18+ diagnosed with a chronic health condition who are receiving treatment.

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The New Health Report 2011 - Backgrounder

  1. 1. The Value of Healthcare is in the Eye of the Beholder Key stakeholders disagree on a number of vital healthcare issues that may affect the drug development process, including how they define “value in healthcare.” As explained in The New Health Report 2011, these stakeholders include: biopharmaceutical executives, managed care executives, physicians and patients with chronic illnesses. Although it’s clear that these stakeholders do not agree on how to define value, they also don’t come to a consensus within their respective groups: › 43% of managed care executives defined value as “cost;” › While another 23% of these executives cited “cost” and “health outcomes;” › And 20% mentioned something else (e.g., “access”). A similar divergence in opinion was seen among the other groups, most notably patients. 31% of patients felt they couldn’t define value. However, the majority of patients do see prescription medications as extremely or very valuable to their health and well-being. While medications were seen as valuable across the board, The New Health Report 2011 showed broad agreement that the U.S. could do more to make treatments more affordable. Backgrounder Full report available at www.quintiles.com/newhealthreport the new health describes the fast-changing world of biopharma, in which multi-stakeholder collaboration, public health, and access to quality and affordable medication must be factored into how and which drugs are brought to market. This is the second year Quintiles has commissioned stakeholder research to better understand the dramatic changes within the drug development landscape. The New Health Report 2011 gauges perceptions of key stakeholders who are increasingly influential in the development of new drugs: biopharmaceutical executives, managed care executives, physicians and patients with chronic illness. About The New Health Report The New Health Report 2011 is a report based on a national survey of biopharmaceutical executives, managed care executives, physicians and patients living with chronic disease conducted by Richard Day Research of Evanston, Ill., on behalf of Quintiles Transnational Corp. Richard Day Research was responsible for all survey design, data analysis and data reporting. Data for this survey were collected between January 5 and February 27, 2011. Included in the sample were 200 biopharmaceutical executives at the director level or above, 153 managed care executives at the director level or above, 400 primary care physicians, 103 board-certified specialists, and 1,000 U.S. adults ages 18+ diagnosed with a chronic health condition who are receiving treatment.
  2. 2. Lifestyle Choices Lead Impact on Health It is widely understood that lifestyle choices have a significant impact on one’s health.1 However, The New Health Report 2011 revealed that 80% of patients don’t believe that their health depends mostly on lifestyle choices. The results show that 69% of these patients believe that lifestyle choices and external factors, such as environment or genetics, play an equal part in their health. The other stakeholder groups disagree – most commonly among managed care executives (69%), who feel that health depends more on lifestyle choices than on factors beyond the patient’s control. Continuing this trend, patients and managed care executives also disapproved of one another’s efforts to improve health outcomes in the U.S. › 54% of managed care executives disapprove of the job patients are doing to improve their own health outcomes; 50% of patients feel the same way about the efforts of managed care organizations to improve health outcomes. The Future is Looking Bright While the survey highlights disagreement on a number of vital healthcare issues, it also revealed broad agreement in one area – improving the quality of prescription medication in the next 10 years. › 76% of managed care executives; › 72% of biopharmaceutical executives; › 72% of patients; and › 59% of physicians are all optimistic that the quality of prescription medications will be significantly improved 10 years from now. Four out of five biopharmaceutical executives (83%) and patients (85%) agree that advancements in medication and treatments fuel this optimism. A majority of physicians (75%) and managed care executives (62%) concur. While patients are optimistic about the future of prescription medications – and open to sharing their experiences for the advancement of research – they do not yet feel strongly about their ability to influence the drug development process. Most physicians, biopharmaceutical executives and managed care executives think the country could do more on key healthcare issues: › Making medication more affordable – 92% of physicians, 88% of managed care executives and 82% of biopharmaceutical executives. › Improving prescription compliance – 71% of physicians, 82% of managed care executives and 73% of biopharmaceutical executives. › Increasing patient education – 70% of physicians, 86% of managed care executives and 73% of biopharmaceutical executives. Patients believe that Americans born today are much more likely to see a better tomorrow than their predecessors. For example, 87% of patients believe the average life expectancy for Americans born today will reach 90 years. However, while patients believe Americans will live longer, fewer than half polled feel the nation will become healthier overall in this time. There is much discussion about the promise of personalized medicine, and biopharmaceutical and managed care executives are optimistic that the approach will ultimately improve efficacy, safety and public health. Most physicians tend to agree. Despite its promise, many foresee drawbacks to personalized medicine – including cost, discrimination and privacy. › Many biopharmaceutical executives, managed care executives and physicians anticipate a negative effect on prescription drug costs. › 44% of physicians see the potential for job and healthcare discrimination. › 50% of physicians and 43% of biopharmaceutical executives predict a negative impact on privacy. 1 New England Journal of Medicine; 357:1221-8. Steven A. Schroeder, M.D., Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. 46% of patients say they currently have no influence on the development of new medications, as compared to only 19% who feel that people like themselves are very influential in the process. Copyright © 2011 Quintiles. Contact Us: Mari Mansfield, Media Relations mari.mansfield@quintiles.com +1 919 998 2639

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