Seven Tepees Youth Program
                                                Outdoor Safety Manual



City Walks to   Campin...
iii   | Table of Contents




             Table of Contents

                             Introduction: Seven Tepees Outd...
1   |




        Introduction: Seven Tepees Outdoor Safety
        Youth are encouraged in … increased understanding and ...
2   |




        •	       The	Centers	for	Disease	Control	(CDC)	found	that	43	percent	of	fatal	drownings	in	2001	oc-
    ...
3   |




                                              Not A Substitute For Training
        Note: This manual does NOT p...
4   |   SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




            Common Safety Protocols For All Trips
            This section provides...
5   |   SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




            Working With Third-Party Organizations
            You often will work ...
6   |   SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




                                                Examples Of Emergency Contact List
...
7   |   SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




            ;   All occupants are seated and wearing seat belts. Check before movin...
8   |   SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




            City Walk
            Protocols

            As often as possible, Seve...
9   |   SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




            What To Do
            ;   Walk block by block, waiting at each corner ...
10 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




                                          Leading Youth On Public Transportation
     ...
11 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




         Camping
         Protocols
         The week-long hiking trip is one of Seven...
12 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




         What to Do
         ;   If a student needs minor First Aid or appears ill, of...
13 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




         Waterfront
         Protocols
         Seven Tepees leads a summer trip every...
14 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




         ;    Assign a minimum of two staff to lifeguard:
             - One staff in ...
15 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




         Wilderness
         Protocols
         Wilderness trips are defined as outing...
16 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM




         ;   Review safety rules and clarify expectations.


         What To Do
     ...
17 | Endox




         Index
         A                                  I                                    T
         ...
18 | Endox
19 | Endox




  Appendix
  This appendix provides examples of two documents referred to throughout the text:
  1.	Trip Pl...
Seven Tepees Youth Program
                         Trip Planning Form

Name of Trip:____________________________________ ...
Once the trip is approved, the lead person should assign people to each of the following tasks.
Each space should be fille...
Seven Tepees Youth Program
                          Incident Report

Name ____________________________                Sta...
Seven	Tepees	Youth	Program,	3177	17th	Street	¤	San	Francisco,	CA	94110	¤	415	522	1550,	fax	415	5221551	¤	www.7tepees.org
Manual   double-sided - safety
Manual   double-sided - safety
Manual   double-sided - safety
Manual   double-sided - safety
Manual   double-sided - safety
Manual   double-sided - safety
Manual   double-sided - safety
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Manual double-sided - safety

  1. 1. Seven Tepees Youth Program Outdoor Safety Manual City Walks to Camping Waterfront Wilderness Public Venues Trips Outings Outings
  2. 2. iii | Table of Contents Table of Contents Introduction: Seven Tepees Outdoor Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Common Safety Protocols For All Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 City Walk Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Camping Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Waterfront Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Wilderness Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
  3. 3. 1 | Introduction: Seven Tepees Outdoor Safety Youth are encouraged in … increased understanding and appreciation of their natural environment. — From “Our Philosophy,” Seven Tepees Handbook As part of its mission to impact the lives of promising inner-city youth, Seven Tepees frequently leads youth on outdoor trips and activities. The youth and their families entrust you, the Seven Tepees staff and volunteers, to keep all outdoor trips safe. Failing to provide the proper safety could result in not only serious injury for a young person, but also in the shutdown of the Seven Tepees Youth Program. This Outdoor Safety Manual provides the common safety guidelines and protocols for all Seven Tepees trips and then lists the specific protocols (what to bring, what to tell the youth, and what to do) for the four main types of trip that Seven Tepees leads: • City Walks to Public Venues • Camping Trips • Waterfront Outings • Wilderness Outings Recent studies show the risk involved in these trips and the need for safety measures to mitigate that risk. For example: • The National Outdoor Leadership School found that from 2003 to 2005 medical incidents on wilderness expeditions often required evacuations (see Figure below). Medical Incidents and Evacuations on Wilderness Expeditions, 2003–2005 600 500 400 209 275 No Evacuation 300 Required Evacuation 200 309 100 203 0 Injuries Illnesses Source: University of Utah and the National Outdoor Leadership School
  4. 4. 2 | • The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) found that 43 percent of fatal drownings in 2001 oc- curred in natural water settings (see figure below). Fatal Drownings in Recreational Areas, 2001 Pool 18% Other/Unspecified 39% Natural Water 43% Source: Centers for Disease Control • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) found that most pedestrian fatali- ties in 2007 occurred in urban areas, at non-intersection locations, and in normal weather conditions (see figure below). Pedestrian Fatalities by Environmental Factor, 2007 At night 67% In normal w eather 90% conditions At non-intersection 77% locations In urban areas 73% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Percentage of Fatalities Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Adhering to the guidelines and protocols in this manual will help Seven Tepees plan and lead safe and fun outdoor trips that teach environmental appreciation and stewardship to young people.
  5. 5. 3 | Not A Substitute For Training Note: This manual does NOT provide explicit instructions for administering First Aid, CPR, or other emergency care during outdoor trips. Refer to your First Aid training for what to do in such medical emer- gencies during camping, waterfront, and city walk trips. All wilderness expeditions will be accompanied by at least one emergency first responder (whether Seven Tepees staff or volunteers from a third-party organi- zation), who will have specific training for handling medical emergencies in the wilderness. For materials that provide that type of instruction, contact the Program Director.
  6. 6. 4 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM Common Safety Protocols For All Trips This section provides the safety protocols that are common to all Seven Tepees outdoor trips. Circle Ups Communicating the Seven Tepees safety rules and expectations to the youth is essential. The tactic you will use to do this are “circle ups,” where an adult leader gathers the students around him or her in a circle and gives instructions. The keys to effectively articulating safety rules and expectations in a circle up are: ; Count down from 10 to give youth time to gather in the circle and settle down by the time you reach 0. ; Have adults interspersed around the circle to minimize distractions and help youth focus. ; Always start by telling youth the name and point of the activity ; At the beginning of the trip, and before each activity during the trip, remind youth that the rules, ex- pectations, and consequences that they agreed to for the Seven Tepees facility also apply on the outdoor trip. ; For the first circle up of the day, show youth a “map of the day,” a hand-drawn representation of all the scheduled activities for the day. Give the map to a youth leader for others to refer to during the day. ; Think of instructions (or refer to this manual) ahead of time and write them down. ; Make instructions concise, ideally 3-5 sentences. ; Give clear boundaries. ; Include an icebreaker to get the kids loosened up, such as stretching exercises if the group will be getting right into an activity as soon as you get out of the vehicle. Seven Tepees Rules Apply Beyond Facility Every year, staff and students establish a Learning Center Agreement for the Seven Tepees facility, which they all sign. Remind the youth that they must follow the same rules of conduct in the agreement when they are on a trip, or they will face the agreed-upon consequences. The General Rule for Youth: Be Respectful, Responsible, and Safe.
  7. 7. 5 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM Working With Third-Party Organizations You often will work with third-party organizations for outdoor activities that require more supervision, such as sea kayaking, skiing and snowboarding, and whitewater rafting. These organizations will have their own safety protocols and leaders. When leading a group on one of these activities, refer to their safety rules and before starting circle up with students, remind them that they must give the third-party organization’s instructors the same attention and respect they should give you. Pre-Trip Planning Protocols Pre-trip safety planning is required for all Seven Tepees outdoor trips. Prior to the day of a trip, Seven Tepees staff must complete the following safety protocols: ; Designate a Trip Leader who will serve as the point staff in charge of the trip. ; Designate a Safety Leader who will be in charge during medical emergencies. ; Keep and maintain an accurate headcount of youth coming on the trip, based on sign-ups AND paren- tal consent forms collected. ; Identify the staff and (if applicable) volunteer(s) from third-party organizations who will participate, and collect their cell phone numbers and contact information. ; Have a meeting with all adults attending to review key safety protocols. ; Clean vans, fill gas tanks, and check oil and water levels (more details on this in the Bus/Van Safety sec- tion below). For a complete list of the required tasks, see the “Trip Planning Form” in the Appendix. Day-of-Trip Protocols On the morning of a trip, Seven Tepees staff must complete the following safety protocols: ; Bring First Aid kits, fully stocked. ; Bring emergency contact information and medical release and consent forms for all youth. ; Bring emergency contact list with the names and phone numbers of the medical facilities and emer- gency services nearest to the destination (see p. 6 for examples). ; Search youth’s bags and collect all contraband. ; Circle up with all attending youth to review safety rules and clarify expectations. ; Take final headcount before leaving (have the students all count off one at a time and then have them repeats their numbers at subsequent headcounts).
  8. 8. 6 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM Examples Of Emergency Contact List San Francisco Fire department – 911 or 861-8020 or 861-8000 Police department – 911 Ambulance – 911 Poison Control – (800) 876-4766 American Red Cross – (800) 660-4272 San Francisco General Hospital – 206-8111 (Emergency Department); 206-8000 (Switchboard/General information) Marin County Fire department – 911 or 485-3300 (San Rafael FD) Police department – 911 Ambulance – 911 Poison Control – (800) 876-4766 American Red Cross – (800) 660-4272 Marin General Hospital – 925-7200 Bus/Van Safety Seven Tepees staff must inspect the transport vehicle(s) for safe operating conditions and maintain these conditions while driving: ; Clean windows and working windshield wipers. ; Working horn and mirrors adjusted to the driver. ; Radio/music off until all seatbelts are fastened. Then music is at the driver’s discretion. ; Turn radio off when entering national park or at least 10 minutes before reaching outdoor destination. Allow this quiet time for students to focus on surroundings. ; Any behavior that is distracting to the driver is prohibited.
  9. 9. 7 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM ; All occupants are seated and wearing seat belts. Check before moving vehicle. ; Pull over and stop vehicle if youth a distraction. ; Two adults in each vehicle, with one sitting in the back seat and monitoring students. ; No cell phone use by driver. Second adult in each van will use cell phone when necessary. ; For all trips to the mountains, bring a complete set of tire chains. What To Bring ; Directions and a map to the destination for each van. ; Food and plenty of water. ; First Aid kits, fully stocked. ; Emergency contact information and medical release and consent forms for all youth. ; Cell phones for adults. ; Cell phone numbers and contact information for all adults and the Seven Tepees Program Director. ; Incident Report Forms (see Appendix) and pens/pencils. What To Do For In-Transit Emergencies If a youth needs medical attention while driving (e.g., motion sickness, dehydration, etc.), the Safety Leader attends to him or her, referring to the youth’s medical release and consent form for any special consider- ations. In case of an accident, the Trip Leader must remain calm and: ; In minor, non-injury accident: exit the vehicle alone and exchange insurance information with the other driver(s) involved. ; In injury accident: call or have someone call for an ambulance. If calling by cell phone, be prepared to tell the operator the location (county, city, road or cross streets). The Trip Leader must complete an incident report and report the accident to the Program Director.
  10. 10. 8 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM City Walk Protocols As often as possible, Seven Tepees will lead youth to local activities such as community service and cultural exhibits by walking. Leading a group of students on busy urban streets requires some safety planning. What To Bring ; Have a minimum of two staff lead the walk: - One in the front of group (“leader”). - One in the rear (“sweeper”). - Any additional staff should walk in the middle. ; Cell phones. ; Emergency contact list (see p. 6 for examples). ; Emergency contact information and medical release and consent forms for all youth. ; Cell phone numbers and contact information for all adults who will participate. ; Incident Report Forms (see Appendix). What To Tell Youth ; Tell youth the duration and destination of the walk before leaving. ; Remind youth that the rules, expectations, and consequences that they agreed to for the Seven Tepees facility also apply on the walk. ; No one can walk ahead of the leader or behind the sweeper. ; No running is allowed. ; Youth can not leave group without staff consent. ; Youth go to restrooms with staff or at minimum in pairs.
  11. 11. 9 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM What To Do ; Walk block by block, waiting at each corner for the entire group to gather before crossing and walking the next block. ; Cross streets at crosswalks only. ; If necessary, send staff into public restrooms in advance of youth. ; If a student needs minor First Aid or appears ill, offer what assistance you can, referring to the youth’s medical release and consent form for any special considerations. ; In an injury accident, call or have someone call 911 immediately. If calling by cell phone, be prepared to tell the operator the location (county, city, road or cross streets). ; Notify the ranking Safety Leader and offer what assistance you can to him or her. ; Record everything the Safety Leader tells you about the injured/ill youth in an Incident Report Form (see Appendix). You will relay this information to the EMS responders when they arrive. ; Contact the Program Director and report the incident. Safety Protocols at Public Venues ; Upon arrival, circle up with all youth to review safety rules and clarify expectations. ; Youth can not leave group activity without staff consent. ; Send staff into public restrooms in advance of youth. ; Youth go to restrooms with staff or at minimum in pairs. ; Have a cell phone to call coordinator/parents/other staff. ; Record all safety incidents in Incident Report Forms (see Appendix) and report them to Program Direc- tor. ; Spread out adults to provide supervision of all areas. ; Assign staff to any specific equipment that could be dangerous. ; Make eye contact with fellow staff to transfer any responsibility above (make sure to pass all details).
  12. 12. 10 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM Leading Youth On Public Transportation Leader enters first to pay for students, and takes a head count as students board. Sweeper gets on last and makes sure all students have boarded. At destination, sweeper gets out first and takes a head count of stu- dents as they exit. Leader remains on board until all youth have gotten off.
  13. 13. 11 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM Camping Protocols The week-long hiking trip is one of Seven Tepees’ longest and most demanding outdoor expeditions. With as many as 40 students attending, it is also the largest. Seven Tepees usually has full camping trips and camp during spring break and on its rafting trip. Camping trips can include hikes, backpacking trips into the wilderness, and swimming in natural waters as well. What To Bring ; One adult to every five youth. ; Food and plenty of water. ; First Aid kits, fully stocked. ; Cell phone and loose change for pay phone call if no cellular service is available. ; Emergency contact list (see p. 6 for examples). ; Proper gear for youth (outerwear, sleeping bags, boots, etc.—provided by third-party organization). ; Emergency contact information and medical release and consent forms for all youth. ; Cell phone numbers and contact information for all adults who will participate. ; Incident Report Forms (see Appendix). What To Tell Youth ; Tell youth the agenda for the trip and the point of each activity. ; Remind youth that the rules, expectations, and consequences that they agreed to for the Seven Tepees facility also apply on this outdoor trip. ; Review safety rules and clarify expectations.
  14. 14. 12 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM What to Do ; If a student needs minor First Aid or appears ill, offer what assistance you can, referring to the youth’s medical release and consent form for any special considerations. ; When splitting into separate groups, each group must have a First Aid kit and a cell phone. ; When youth are divided into small teams (4–6 students) for games and activities, staff team leaders must ensure youth on their teams have full water bottles, are well hydrated, have applied sunscreen, and have all everything they need for the given activity. ; For medical emergencies, call or have someone call 911 immediately. ; Notify the ranking Safety Leader and offer what assistance you can to him or her. ; Record everything the Safety Leader tells you about the injured/ill youth in an Incident Report Form (see Appendix). You will relay this information to the EMS responders when they arrive. ; Contact the Program Director and report the incident. Idle Time And Boredom Can Spell Trouble Providing structure is a good way to ensure students stay engaged in only safe activities. Keep a tight sched- ule of activities for youth during camping trips and communicate the agenda to them clearly and frequently. Here’s an example schedule: 8:00 AM – Breakfast 8:30 AM – Circle up 8:45 AM – Journaling 9:00 AM – Prep for trip 9:30 AM – Hike circle up and divide into groups 10:00 AM – Hiking 12:00 PM – Return from hike 12:30 PM – Lunch And so on…
  15. 15. 13 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM Waterfront Protocols Seven Tepees leads a summer trip every year that involves waterfront activities such as whitewater rafting and sea kayaking. Students can also participate in waterfront trips during camping trips, when they may swim in natural waters. What To Bring ; One adult to every five youth ; First Aid kits, fully stocked. ; Cell phone and loose change for pay phone call if no cellular service is available. ; Emergency contact list (see p. 6 for examples). ; Proper gear for youth (life vests, water shoes, etc.—often provided by third-party organization). ; Emergency contact information and medical release and consent forms for all youth. ; Cell phone numbers and contact information for all adults who will participate. ; Incident Report Forms (see Appendix). What To Tell Youth ; Circle up with all youth to review safety rules and clarify expectations before any student enters water. ; Set clear boundaries of where youth can go. ; Youth must pass swim test in order to go in above knees. What To Do ; Take a final headcount before allowing youth in water.
  16. 16. 14 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM ; Assign a minimum of two staff to lifeguard: - One staff in the water. - One staff on the shore. ; Lifeguard staff must scan water every 3-4 seconds and DO NOT engage with youth while on guard. ; Lifeguard staff must know number of youth in the water at all times. ; Get youth out of water if disruptive or disrespectful. ; If a student needs help in the water, go immediately to him or her, take a life jacket, and get the student to shore. ; If a student requires CPR, offer what assistance you can, referring to the youth’s medical release and consent form for any special considerations. ; If the student is not responsive, call 911 immediately. ; Notify the ranking Safety Leader and offer what assistance you can to him or her. ; Record everything the Safety Leader tells you about the injured youth in an Incident Report Form (see Appendix). You will relay this information to the EMS responders when they arrive. ; Contact the Program Director and report the incident. Test Safety Of Jumping/Diving Areas Staff must test to ensure that a jumping or diving area is safe (deep, clear of rocks, etc.) before allowing youth to jump in the water. When the area is deemed safe, the staff in the water should keep the area clear by quickly moving youth who have jumped/dived in from the area before other youth jump/dive.
  17. 17. 15 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM Wilderness Protocols Wilderness trips are defined as outings to remote environments (for example, deep in the woods or on a mountain) where Emergency Medical Services (EMS/911) are two or more hours away. They usually occur during camping trips as daytime or overnight backpacking excursions. With no immediate EMS help avail- able or advanced medical care facilities nearby, you and any accompanying staff from a third-party organiza- tion, such as Environmental Traveling Companions, must provide the emergency services usually performed by EMS staff. This need to administer possibly critical care makes wilderness trips the most dangerous outings for Seven Tepees. What to Bring ; One map for each adult with the locations of emergency phones and trails. ; One adult to every four youth. ; Food and plenty of water, as well as a water filter/purifier. ; First Aid kits, fully stocked. ; Cell phone, or satellite phone if no cellular service is available. ; Emergency contact list (see p. 6 for examples). ; Proper gear for youth (backpacks, outerwear, boots, etc.—often provided by third-party organization). ; Proper food-storage gear (bear canisters, etc.). ; Emergency contact information and medical release and consent forms for all youth. ; Cell phone numbers and contact information for all adults and the Seven Tepees Program Director. ; Incident Report Forms (see Appendix) and pens/pencils. What To Tell Youth ; Tell youth the agenda for the trip (duration, destination, when they will be stopping, etc.). ; Remind youth that the rules, expectations, and consequences that they agreed to for the Seven Tepees facility also apply on the trip.
  18. 18. 16 | SEVEN TEPEES YOUTH PROGRAM ; Review safety rules and clarify expectations. What To Do ; If a student needs minor First Aid or appears ill, offer what assistance you can, referring to the youth’s medical release and consent form for any special considerations. ; For medical emergencies, call or have someone call 911 immediately. ; Notify the ranking Safety Leader and offer what assistance you can to him or her. ; Record everything the Safety Leader tells you about the injured/ill youth in an Incident Report Form (see Appendix). You will relay this information to the EMS responders when they arrive. ; Contact the Program Director and report the incident. No Democracy In An Emergency The designated medical emergency leader or adult with the most wilderness First Aid training is in charge during an emergency. All other adults present must defer to the leader and can only offer assistance—never intervene. Authority in an emergency situation will follow the following chain of command: 1. First in charge: Wilderness emergency first responder (volunteer from third-party organization). 2. Second in charge: Seven Tepees staff with wilderness First Aid training. 3. Third in charge: Adult with First Aid and CPR training.
  19. 19. 17 | Endox Index A I T accidents. See in-transit emer- Incident Report Forms Appendix team activities 12 gencies in-transit emergencies 7 third-party organizations 5 traffic emergencies. See in-transit B J emergencies backpacking 15 jumping in water. See diving in trip leader 5 bag search 5 water V bear canisters 15 bus safety 6 L van safety. See bus safety leader (on city walks) 8 vehicle safety. See bus safety C Learning Center Agreement 4 W camping 11–12 lifeguarding 13–14 circle ups 4–6, 9, 12 waterfront 13–14 city walks 8–9 M whitewater rafting 13 CPR training 3, 14, 16 map of the day 4 wilderness 15–16 crashes. See in-transit emergen- music on bus/van 7 working with third-party orga- cies nizations. See third-party P organizations D pre-trip planning 5 pedestrian safety 2 day-of-trip protocols 5 public restrooms 9 diving in water 14 public transportation 10 drownings 2 public venues 9 E R emergency contact list 6 radio on bus/van. See music on EMS 11, 14, 16–18 bus/van recording incidents 3–4, 10, 12, F 14, 16 First Aid 5, 7, 9, 11–13, 15 First Aid training 3 S safety leader 5, 7, 9, 12, 14, 16 H sea kayaking 13 headcount 5, 6, 10, 13 scheduling 12 sweeper 8 swimming 13–14
  20. 20. 18 | Endox
  21. 21. 19 | Endox Appendix This appendix provides examples of two documents referred to throughout the text: 1. Trip Planning Form 2. Incident Report Form
  22. 22. Seven Tepees Youth Program Trip Planning Form Name of Trip:____________________________________ Date(s): ______________________ Location: _____________________________Staff in Charge: ___________________________ Contact Info for Outside Organization: ______________________________________________ What are the goals of this trip in connection to Seven Tepees’ mission? What are the specific outcomes? How will you judge the trip’s success? Attendance Number of staff/adults needed Number of drivers needed Number of students that can attend Requirements for students to attend Others invited (mentors, board members, etc) Schedule Time for staff to arrive at Learning Center Time for students to arrive at Learning Center Time to leave Learning Center Date and Time to arrive at location Date and Time to leave location Time to return to Learning Center Budget Budget Category Amount allotted Get approval from the Program Director at least five weeks before an overnight trip or three weeks before a day trip you would like to plan. ___________________________________________ ________________________________ Program Director Signature Date Revised 04/08
  23. 23. Once the trip is approved, the lead person should assign people to each of the following tasks. Each space should be filled-in. If it does not apply to the trip, write N/A. Give to Program Director at least four weeks before an overnight trip or two weeks before a day trip. Before the Trip By When Who Is Responsible Create a flyer and permission form Make announcements and create a sign-up sheet Make phone calls to parents/guardians Collect permission forms Create the itinerary Plan activities and games Plan and purchase food Pack food and equipment Clean vans, gas-up, check oil and water Bring first-aid kits and emergency contact info Print directions and give to each driver Assign student groups and team leaders Meet with all youth attending (date and time) Meet with all adults attending (date and time) Morning of the Trip Who Is Responsible Make reminder calls home Set out food for breakfast/lunch Search bags/ Collect cell phones/electronics Pack coolers/Load vans During the Trip Who Is Responsible Drive van(s) Hold the credit card and all receipts Hold the first-aid kits Lead the opening Lead the closing Administer youth evaluation of the trip Take pictures/video Clean-up at location After The Trip By When Who Is Responsible Clean used gear and put away (storage room) Clean vans/gas-up Get photos developed and create poster Send thank-you cards Staff evaluation of the trip Materials needed to purchase for this trip Materials needed to pack for this trip Revised 04/08
  24. 24. Seven Tepees Youth Program Incident Report Name ____________________________ Staff Name __________________________ Date: ___________ Time: ___________ Location (specific)____________________ Type of incident (please circle): First Aide/Injury Social Disturbance Other DESCRIPTION OF EMERGENCY, ACCIDENT, OR EVENT: How the event happened, relevant people involved, etc… Describe how the person was hurt or affected: RESPONSE: Immediate Response: Follow-up plan Notification:  parents: Name: _____________ Date: ________ Notes:  Other _________ Staff Signature _______________________ P.D. Signature: ________________________ (A copy of this form must be placed in the behavior/incident binder)
  25. 25. Seven Tepees Youth Program, 3177 17th Street ¤ San Francisco, CA 94110 ¤ 415 522 1550, fax 415 5221551 ¤ www.7tepees.org

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