Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Sociocracy - Pursuit of great decisions, fast

686 views

Published on

An introduction to a consent based decision making process to improve speed at reaching great decisions within a continuous improvement framework.

Published in: Leadership & Management
  • -- DOWNLOAD THIS BOOKS INTO AVAILABLE FORMAT -- ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... Download FULL PDF EBOOK here { http://bit.ly/2m6jJ5M } ......................................................................................................................... (Unlimited)
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Sociocracy - Pursuit of great decisions, fast

  1. 1. SOCIOCRACY Pursuit of great decisions, fast Qaiser Mazhar Tech Lead - Team Odin
  2. 2. MAKING DECISIONS IS HARD • Group of perfectionists • Diverse backgrounds • Multiple directions and drivers • Traditionally difficult to change direction • Expense of knowingly taking on tech debt • Want to produce stable long term value
  3. 3. CONSENSUS IS GREAT RIGHT…. RIGHT? • Consensus doesn’t scale well past a small tightly knit group • A high level of commitment and time is required for consensus to be an effective route to agreeable decisions • Easy to fall into a trap of analysis paralysis • In larger groups such as a whole department, it is impossible to make all members happy
  4. 4. WHAT IS SOCIOCRACY? • Method of governance that ensures inclusiveness, accountability, transparency, and productivity • Structure that both involves all members of the organization in policy decision making and produces a strong and efficient decision-making environment • Incorporates the best of the last 100 years of management theory • Acknowledges human nature and the pursuit of happiness has a significant influence on business performance • Key principles lend themselves very well to agile methodology
  5. 5. HISTORY OF SOCIOCRACY • Founded in 19th century France by Philosopher Auguste Comte • Introduced to America by Sociologist Lester Ward • If society could be guided by the will and intellect of all individuals combined, society would become the greatest force ever known • Kees Boeke implemented the principles in his school in 1930’s Holland • Gerard Endenburg has run his company for the past 50 years after studying under Kees. His company is exempt from the requirement of labour unions due to the way the company is run
  6. 6. FOUR GOVERNING PRINCIPLES • Circle organisation structure • Consent governs decision making • Double linking promotes strong enough communication bonds between circles • Selection of people in open discussion to roles and responsibilities
  7. 7. ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE • In a hierarchical organisation, policy and communication flows downwards • The majority of employees do not feel empowered to contribute to decisions that directly affect them or contribute to problems they are close to • Sociocracy builds circles of people that have high autonomy and sharing of knowledge within their domain (think micro organisations) • Inclusion of all members means people are the organisation rather than it being a separate entity that must be adhered to (think self organising teams) • Circles have their own aims and designate functions to their members
  8. 8. ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE
  9. 9. ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE
  10. 10. CONSENT • Make decisions through consent not consensus • Valid objections are welcome and considering better solutions is encouraged within the eye of forward movement • A paradigm shift in thinking, the speaker is not driven to prove to others that they are correct, others object if things are wrong • Objections are valid if the proposed solution is flawed or a viable alternative is materially better • Ongoing evaluation improves solutions, avoid first pass perfection • Not all decisions require consent, these cases are enabled by consent
  11. 11. DOUBLE LINKING • For wider reaching decisions, a functional leader and an internal representative of each circle share information and make decisions on behalf of a circle • Moving away from top down command and control structures • Heterarchies perform like a lattice or spider’s web • Nodes can be connected to surrounding nodes without needing to go through or getting permission from some other node
  12. 12. REPRESENTATIVE SELECTION • Clear expectations of leaders and members charged with responsibilities so all know what is expected of them (think contracting sessions) • Highly affirming, people are openly appreciated and acknowledged for their strengths • Representation of a group is by trust and not power, unpleasantness is eliminated • Friction is reduced and productivity increases since everyone accepts the final selection as the best choice • Representatives should rotate based on different aims, best person forward for a specific goal
  13. 13. BENEFITS • Efficient knowledge transfer, utilises collective knowledge of whole organisation • Concerns are heard and respected, trust is built • Happy, fulfilled and empowered people that do not feel left out • Promotes creative thinking by everyone in the organisation • Effective, flatter, responsive, transparent and productive organisations • Greater innovation and risk taking, quicker buy in as decisions are continuously evaluated • Higher productivity and profitability
  14. 14. DISADVANTAGES • It takes time to adjust to a paradigm shift in practice • Old ways of doing things are hard to let go of • People may become uncomfortable at first as they become accustomed to sharing the responsibility of difficult decisions
  15. 15. DECISION MAKING IN TEAM ODIN INTERNAL TEAM DECISIONS • Problem identified • Pair picking up task become problem owners • Investigation is conducted • Key stakeholders/experts consulted • Results and initial conclusions shared with team • Objections raised • Objections addressed • Problem owner makes decision and disseminates conclusions to all affected
  16. 16. DECISION MAKING IN TEAM ODIN WIDE REACHING DECISIONS • Problem identified • Problem owner identified • Open audience meeting to frame problem and discuss potential solutions • Key stakeholders/experts identified • Key solutions identified • Closed discussion with key stakeholders/experts on key solutions • Problem owner makes decision and disseminates conclusions to all affected
  17. 17. KEY TAKEAWAYS • Avoid “first pass perfection”, aim for continuous improvement • Make objections to things you think are wrong, give consent to proposals that are viable • The internal and external decision making process is evolving and improving very quickly

×