Off Season Swimming 12.13

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Off Season Swimming 12.13

  1. 1. Off Season Swimming With TEAM Pursuit Athletic Performance Coach Al Lyman, CSCS, FMS, HKC © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  2. 2. Tonight’s Discussion • Should you really spend time now, trying to improve? • Common roadblocks to success • What’s the most important body part for swimming success? • Basic concepts and essential attributes • Assuming I might want to improve, where should my focus be? • Strategies for improvement • Review: Common roadblocks to success • Q&A © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  3. 3. Common Roadblocks To Success 1. A lack of an appropriate progression from A to Z (baby steps). 2. Impatience (relates to #1). 3. An unwillingness to CHANGE (pride and stubbornness). 4. Not seeing the learning process as a journey of discovery and growth – an fun adventure (relates to #2). 5. Impatience (relates to #1 and #4). 6. A lack of necessary flexibility (and an unwillingness to make a commitment to improve it – relates to #2, #3, and #4). 7. Time management. 8. A lack of enough L.S.D. to make it ALL palatable! © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  4. 4. Question: What is the most important body part for swimming? Answer? (Hint) Every human movement, thought, or feeling, is a precisely timed electric signal traveling through a chain of neurons – a circuit of nerve fibers. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  5. 5. Your Brain – Hard Skills – Myelin • Swimming correctly is a “hard” skill (vs. a soft skill) • Groove a groove = easy! Change a groove = hard! • Baby steps - slow it down - attentive repetition • Sweet spot at the edge of your capabilities • Practice makes myelin – myelin makes permanent! © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  6. 6. Basic Concepts Efficient swimming is summarized by these two… • You want to learn to REDUCE DRAG. This means rigidly maintaining a relaxed and streamlined position during every phase of the stroke. • You want to generate MORE PROPULSION. You do this by “leveraging” your arm strokes by rigidly holding relaxed correct technique. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  7. 7. Fundamental attributes that every single good swimmer possesses: • Efficient (and correct) technical SKILLS / HABITS. • High levels of FLEXIBILITY o arms/shoulders/back/ankles. • Swim specific neuromuscular STRENGTH o the muscular strength that comes by moving well (correctly) and consistently. • A willingness to LEARN and CHANGE… o …while at the same time, enjoying the process of learning and changing. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  8. 8. How can you apply this to YOUR swimming? • Commit to never taking another “incorrect” stroke • Chunking: small pieces, one at a time • Practice-practice-practice, in and out of the pool • Slow down – be aware of what you are doing • Drill over short distances - one skill at a time • Combine swim practice with appropriate dryland (strength and flexibility) training © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  9. 9. Where Should My Focus Be? The Catch • High elbow / early vertical forearm: o Analogy: paddling a canoe o your forearm is the “paddle” • Not propulsive: o it is preparation for the propulsive phase of the stroke (the pull) • A very specific “hard” skill requiring perfect, progressive repetition to develop • Requires swim specific strength to hold over time, without deterioration © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  10. 10. Source: Haydn Wooley – Future Dreams
  11. 11. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  12. 12. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  13. 13. Strategies for Improvement The focus of your off season swim training should be: • developing the “correct” neural pathways by practicing only “good” form, not reinforcing bad habits. • developing more flexibility to allow for “correct” movement patterns. • developing “swim specific” coordination and strength to be able to do what you know you should do. • the focus is NOT on the pure strength of the muscles, but on their correct coordination. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  14. 14. • If flexibility is a limiter, commit to stretching daily, and before and after each and every swim. • Master correct catch technique OUT of the water first, before attempting to apply it IN the water. • Practice progressive drills regularly, doing them slowly and thoughtfully. When you are drilling, focus on improving only one skill at a time. • Use any and all “tools” that you have available to you, to progress from one stage to the next stage. • Video yourself regularly to ensure you’re swimming correctly. • Swim short segments of easy intervals to help you first change habits and then instill them until they become the “natural” way you swim. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  15. 15. 4 Steps to Developing Swim Specific Strength 1. Dry-land practice: grooving the groove of a “correct” catch • High elbow early vertical forearm (EVF) 2. Tubing exercises: 1. elbow “pops” 2. full “catches” • See video 3. Relentless drill practice • Short segments; focus on only 1 skill at a time 4. Small bits of full stroke swimming (baby steps) • Done for only as long or as many strokes as you can do perfectly © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  16. 16. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  17. 17. Common Roadblocks To Success 1. A lack of an appropriate progression from A to Z (baby steps). 2. Impatience (relates to #1). 3. An unwillingness to CHANGE (pride and stubbornness). 4. Not seeing the learning process as a journey of discovery and growth – an fun adventure (relates to #2). 5. Impatience (relates to #1 and #4). 6. A lack of necessary flexibility (and an unwillingness to make a commitment to improve it – relates to #2, #3, and #4). 7. Time management. 8. A lack of enough L.S.D. to make it ALL palatable! © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
  18. 18. Questions? Thank YOU for joining me! © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE

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