2014 Student Learning Outcomes

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Presentation from various departments within Purdue University Student Affairs on Student Learning Outcomes Assessment from the 2013-14 academic year.

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  • Explain what the purpose of AFROTC is it is an officer training program with the purpose to commission and server on active duty for 4 years after college. It is the main path to becoming an officer in the air force and one of only 3 ways to become an officer. If they would like to become an officer, then they must go through the academy, ROTC or very rarely OTS.
  • The lecture class is a standard sit down college course taught by the cadre at the detachment – 1 Hour once a weekPT is 3 times a week for 1 hourLeadership Lab is the hands on drill and ceremonies, marching, flag protocol, team building exercises, briefings, how to wear the uniform—basically anything that needs hands on active involvementLeadership Lab is 2 hours once a week - Thursday morning 0730-0920The total time commitment for Freshmen and Sophomores is 6 hoursThe total time commitment for Juniors and Seniors is 8 hours (the Lecture class is 1.5 hours twice a week, everything else is the same)Cadets will wear their uniform to the Lecture class but can change afterwards. Cadets will also wear their uniform all day on Thursdays.There is no commitment to the program in the first 2 years for non-scholarship cadets, cadets must make the decision by the first day of their Junior year to continue in the program and owe the Air Force 4-years after college, or to quit the program.
  • Freshman lecture classes is Air Force 101 –it is designed to get everyone on the same page, regardless if theyare from a military family or have no idea how the military worksSophomore lecture is a history class – it is important for future air force officers to understand where we came from and the lessons of the past to be effective. It is a very general overview.Leadership lab is the hands on portion of the training, teaching cadets everything from how to wear the uniform and work under pressure to letting them practice leading….which will be their main job on active duty
  • Field training is ‘boot camp’ with a leadership twist. Unlike if enlisting in the air force, where they will teach new recruits how to wear the uniform, march and PT, cadets are already expected to know these things for field training. This is an environment where cadets can take what they learned in the first 2 years of ROTC and test it in stressful situations. Cadets will be given leadership positions throughout the encampment where they can grow in leadership skills.Cadets competed for an ‘enrollment allocation’ early their second semester of their sophomore year. The number of allocations given out depend on the number of cadets competing across the nation and the number of active duty officer positions available when they will graduate. For the 2010 encampment it was a 75% selection rate. Things taken into consideration for the competition:Cumulative GPA, the second semester of sophomore year will not be taken into account as the allocations will already be given outPT scorePerformance in the ROTC program (commander’s ranking)SAT/ACT or AFOQT scores – whichever is highest
  • Lecture class has been bumped up to 1.5 hours twice a weekLeadership Lab – now the cadet will have a leadership position in the cadet wing. The first 2 years they were in learning mode, in the last two they actually get to organize, plan and run leadership lab and PT. This gives the cadets hands on leadership and project management experience with the oversight and guidance of the cadre members, so they are not hitting their first assignment with no practical leadership experience.
  • After college cadets will receive a commission into the active duty air force as a 2 LT.A 2nd LT outranks 80% of the current active duty air force the first day on the job. They could easily be in charge of 10+ people, some who have been in the air force 20+ years. An officer is a leader first, their specialty (pilot, cyber operations, security forces) second.ROTC is designed to be that leadership training to prepare cadets for their active duty responisbilities.
  • Good Morning ladies and gentlemen, I am CPT Ralph Merrill, Assistant professor of military science from the Army ROTC program here at Purdue. Today I would like to run through a handful of slides, outlining our program, and opportunities unique to our program that we have mapped into our Student learning outcomes. In addition I will discuss challenges that we will work through within the program.
  • Here is a brief overview of things that we will be talking about today. These topics include our learning outcome domains of which we have our 5 primary however, additional areas for consideration for other domains that we can think about as well. Following this, I will talk about the current mapping of our program, and how we have the unique opportunity of nesting within our core curriculum, thus providing the student an in-class opportunity to achieve some of, if not all outcomes. I will then touch base on a few opportunities that are unique to the program, that although not currently mapped within our learning outcome domains, provide an opportunity for superior performers, to diversify their skills; assisting in future opportunities within the military, as well as a unique experience that when compared to their peers on the civilian side of the house. These are just a few examples of what we can offer with regards to the Student Learning Outcome domains and by no means are totally inclusive in this clip, but are examples of opportunity presented within this organization to provide a unique college experience. Finally, as we can all relate to in some way I am sure, I will talk about some of the challenges that we will have, specifically within our program, and planned means for overcoming those challenges.
  • These are the primary outcome domains that we are working under. Of note, I list career at the top, because to start a successful career within the Army as a Second Lieutenant, the additional 4 attributes of Interpersonal Skills, Knowledge, Leadership and of utmost importance Responsibility are some of the critical building blocks that we expect our cadets to leave this program with. We consider ourselves in the business of building Platoon leaders; not necessarily Officers. The term “Officer” can be encompassing of many rates, as well as branches of service but the foundation of a successful officer in the Army and thus, a successful career start with core attributes that need to be embedded from the start. Within our program, we provide opportunities for a Career; and for a lot of our students, this is what they strive for. However for all students attending classes within the ROTC program, we try to embed certain characteristics-life skills, that will assist in driving them to success…either in the military, or the civilian world. Of note, on the right hand side I list attributes that are “considerable” with the paradigm that, we do have programs that could very easily fall within these domains; some of which I will discuss later.
  • This is how our domains map out. Fortunately within the Army ROTC department we have the ability to map our curriculum within each of the learning domains. Values and Ethics, Personal Development, Leadership, Tactics & Techniques, & Officership that are taught at all levels of MS class, but to a different extent. The intent is that in developing future officers for the United States Army, we develop a well rounded leader who, is able to be flexible within each of the different categories however, meld together a common mix of different learning experiences to be able to remain flexible & adaptable. Of note, you can see that under the domain of Leadership, we have applied block checks to all categories; thus the intent of developing a well rounded leader who is able to think critically, pull on experiences from the past as well as experience from those around him in his or her development. This is something that is not taught at a specific level within their education; rather it pulls from the experiences and knowledge that they have gained collectively from the program as a whole, and therefore blend with other parts of curriculum.
  • Within the program we also provide additional opportunities for development. These include clubs, community service events, and cadet practical field training events. These additional opportunities, when paired with core curriculum provide students opportunities to advance in both personal and professional development. They foster environments that can be invaluable to their personal and professional experiences within the program. Under clubs a few areas that I would like to highlight would be ranger club, for tactical and technical development, but also development in leadership abilities, and mentorship. Pathfinder, which reciprocates Cross fit, provides physical improvement as well as mental development and resiliency.Opportunities to participate in community service projects shows cadets participating in the program, the big picture and the importance of giving back not just to those that have served prior, but to the community. This was evident during the Military Family Research Institute’s stand down during veterans day weekend, in which cadets had the opportunity to go out into the community and assist with those in need. Additional training opportunities, such as the Cultural Understanding and Language Proficiency program, provides cadets the opportunity to deploy to areas around the world and immerse into local cultures, as well as the ranks of the US Army. This program provides opportunities to experience something outside of the day to day campus life, and provides an opportunity to do something that not very many people will have the chance to experience. We currently have 8 attendees for this year. They will be located in the Ukraine, Burundi, Dominican Republic, Moldova, Senegel, Estonia, Tanzania and Mongolia. These opportunities as discussed earlier, can nest considerably within the other outcome domains: Community, Global Diversity, and Wellness.
  • Having given just a few examples of additional opportunities, also provided us with our first challenge, being that the opportunities that we have to evaluate can and do become very time intensive, in that there really are a lot of in class and out of class areas for assessment. Our means of combating this however, is through selection. Although there is a lot of opportunity for out of class experience, only select individuals who demonstrate performance above and beyond the normal day to day requirements of the program, are afforded the opportunity to participate in certain clubs, or training opportunities that go beyond the scope of what is done in class. Therefore the metric for measurement gets reduced, and provides us with a “workable” product for demonstrated performance outside of the “in class” experience. The second challenge that we run into is that, within some of these programs they are either not evaluated, or evaluated in a manner where a cadet will receive an Evaluation Report, in which demonstrated actions may not be quantifiable. Programs such as CULP, provide an Officer Evaluation Report, as to a cadet’s actions while in attendance but may not necessarily cover the entire breadth of the experience that they have. Further, as with different cultures 2 cadets experiences within the same program may not be the same, due to different areas of location. To assist us with this process, we have decided to adopt ideas discussed previously during other work sessions with members in this group, such as Professional Development Reflection Journals, or Service Learning Reflection Journals, to provide us with additional data to use in our observations. Finally, certain schools that we provide opportunities for are trained to a “GO/NO-GO” standard. For example Army Airborne School is broken down into 3 phases (ground phase/tower phase & jump week) in which although there are 3 separate phases, each one of these is graded to a pass/fail standard. Therefore the determining metric for success is the selection process in itself; initially determined at our level as to who will have the opportunity to compete for, and finally the selection by our higher echelon to determine who if any, is selected above their peers for school attendance.
  • Purdue University’s Horizons study abroad experiences are offered to the program to expand global educational opportunities for traditionally underrepresented groups. Prior to the generous grant provided to Horizons by the Office of the Provost, we supported and encouraged students to study abroad, however participation was negatively affected due to cost, a general lack of information, and low confidence in their abilities to travel abroad. It was obvious that there existed a need for outreach to this particular group of students and in recognizing this need, Horizons was granted another year of subsidized funding. The Horizons Costa Rica experience provided a framework for Purdue in increasing the number of first-generation, low income college students who are more knowledgeable about and are participating in study abroad experiences. The renewal of our grant funding to offer study abroad opportunities is dependent on whether or not we succeed in making an evaluative impact on the participants to prove the need of a program such as this.
  • Students rated their confidence levels on the following scale: Not Confident, Somewhat, Moderately, Very, and Extremely. In comparing pre and post comparative results, we saw increases in student confidence levels in each evaluated item. Student feedback in the areas of extremely confident doubled post evaluation in the confidence areas of: Knowledge of their discipline in a global context, ability to get a job in a global context, ability to lead others, achieving their life’s aspirations, and taking action to decrease other people’s suffering. Student feedback in the areas of extremely confident more than tripled post evaluation in the confidence areas of: goal setting, navigation through unfamiliar environments, ability to solve problems, and the ability to solve conflict. Student confidence increased to very confident in cross cultural communication and navigation through unfamiliar environment two-fold.
  • Boiler Tracks is modeled after similar programs at other institutions specifically UNC-Chapel Hill where Carol was involved as a high school students, college student, and later staff member at UNC.
  • Boiler Tracks is modeled after similar programs at other institutions specifically UNC-Chapel Hill where Carol was involved as a high school students, college student, and later staff member at UNC.
  • Boiler Tracks is modeled after similar programs at other institutions specifically UNC-Chapel Hill where Carol was involved as a high school students, college student, and later staff member at UNC.
  • Discuss how we decided to use self-efficacy
  • Today- focus on nutrition data
  • 2014 Student Learning Outcomes

    1. 1. Student Learning Outcomes Luncheon 2014
    2. 2. ASSISTANT VP FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS Lee Gordon
    3. 3. Student Involvement • Lee Gordon contextualized the importance of co-curricular student learning outcomes by presenting data that highlights the effect of student involvement on academic outcomes and retention. • The table on the next slide illustrates that effect.
    4. 4. Involvement Outcomes of Purdue Undergraduate Students March 26, 2014 Office of Vice President for Student Affairs Academic Outcomes Registered Undergrads Self-Reporting Membership in an Organization or Club during Fall 2013 N Ave Term GPA Term GPA >= 3.0 Ave Hours Earned Earned Hours >= 15 Term GPA >= 3.0 and Earned Hours >= 15 Ave Overall GPA Overall GPA >= 3.0 All Ugrads 29,506 2.92 16,553 (56%) 14.6 18,267 (61%) 11,840 (40%) 3.02 16,338 (55%) Self-Report Involvement 12,531 3.02 7660 (61%) 15.0 8,248 (66%) 5,623 (44%) 3.13 7,710 (61%) Registered Undergrads Holding Office of President or Treasurer during Fall 2013 N Ave Term GPA Term GPA >= 3.0 Ave Hours Earned Earned Hours >= 15 Term GPA >= 3.0 and Earned Hours >= 15 Ave Overall GPA Overall GPA >= 3.0 Ugrad Peer Cohort (less 01 Classification)* 24,597 2.92 13,907 (56%) 14.4 14,962 (60%) 9,799 (40%) 3.05 13,648 (55%) President or Treasurer 840 3.14 542 (64%) 14.9 550 (65%) 449 (53%) 3.21 567 (68%) *Students with Classification 01 (first semester freshmen) are omitted. Officers must be 02 and above. Retention Students Matriculated Fall 2012 and Fall 2013 (Status as of Spring 2014)** Fall 2012 Fall 2013 Fall 2012 Fall 2013 All Students (FT/FT) All Underrepresented Minority Students (FT/FT) Continued Enrollment 5629 (89%) 6168 (98%) Continued Enrollment 463 (85%) 541 (97%) Dropped or Voluntarily Withdrew 699 (11%) 149 (2%) Dropped or Voluntarily Withdrew 78 (14%) 19 (3%) Students Self-Reporting Involvement URM Students Self –Reporting any Involvement Continued Enrollment 1479 (93%) 1015 (98%) Continued Enrollment 122 (91%) 91 (100%) Dropped or Voluntarily Withdrew 103 (6%) 20 (2%) Dropped or Voluntarily Withdrew 12 (9%) 0% Students Holding Office of President or Treasurer URM Students Holding Office of President or Treasurer Continued Enrollment 339 (98%) NA* Continued Enrollment 28 (97%) NA* Dropped or Voluntarily Withdrew 7 (2%) NA* Dropped or Voluntarily Withdrew 1 (3%) NA* *First Semester Freshmen cannot hold officer positions in clubs and organizations. **Information not available before Fall 2012.
    5. 5. PURDUE MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS Steve Schlenk
    6. 6. Student Learning Outcomes
    7. 7. Percentage of PMO students who agree participating in PMO has helped them to… 98.6% Develop Relationships with Others 97.9% Hold Themselves Accountable 96.6% Listen Attentively and Respond to Others 95.9% Manage Their Time 94.5% Exhibit Self-Reliant Behaviors
    8. 8. SLO most impacted by PMO participation Develop Relationships Manage Time Effectively Demonstre Professionalism Communicate Effectively
    9. 9. Normandy American Cemetery  May 27, 2013  U.S. Memorial Day
    10. 10. CENTER FOR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Cher Yazvac
    11. 11. Acing the Interview Cher Yazvac, Associate Director for Career Development Center for Career Opportunities YONG 132
    12. 12. Learning Outcome Statement As a result of completing the interviewing workshop, 75% of the students will immediately be able to demonstrate the practical application of behavior theory in interviewing as evidenced by either responding verbally or in writing to a behavioral question including an action and result and by stating that they are confident in their ability to demonstrate a skill to an employer using action and result. (Used Backward Design Worksheet)
    13. 13. STAR Method situation task ACTION result Your Secret Weapon
    14. 14. Behavioral Interview Response Behavioral interview response visual example Situatio n Task Result Action
    15. 15. Tell me about a time you took a leadership role on a project. S) During my sophomore year at Purdue I was appointed chairperson of the XYZ Committee at my residence hall. T) The committee was responsible for organizing a Women’s health fair to bring community resources within the reach of hall residents. A) I first led the group on an analysis of similar events that we wanted to see 300 attendees and representatives from 10 community organizations. I organized the committee into a marketing subgroup and a community outreach subgroup each responsible for achieving the above mentioned goals. R) In the end, the event was a great success. We had 500 attendees and representatives from 12 community groups. The fair was later chosen for the “event of the year” award amongst all residence hall events that year.
    16. 16. Practice Questions #1 Tell me about a time when you worked effectively in a team. #2 What is one of the most challenging tasks you have faced and how did you handle it?
    17. 17. Interviewing Workshop Worksheet Written Response to Behavioral Question Task Action Result Verbal Peer Evaluation Self-Evaluation Please assess your level of confidence with behavioral interviewing in the following statement. After participating in this interviewing workshop, I can tell about an experience and include an action and result which demonstrates a skill. - Not at all confident - Not very confident - Confident - Very Confident Choose a partner and verbally respond to one of the sample questions using the STAR technique. Ask your partner to evaluate whether you have articulated all four aspects by checking the boxes below. Choose one behavioral question to respond to using the STAR technique. · Tell me about a time you worked effectively in a team. · What is one of the most challenging tasks you have faced and how did you handle it? Situation Situation - Task - Action - Result - S
    18. 18. 2012-2013 • 70% Wrote Action and Result • 87% Verbalized Action and Result • 91% Confident or Very Confident • 80% Either Wrote or Verbalized Action & Result & Expressed Confidence 2013-2014 • 70% Wrote Action and Result • 93% Verbalized Action and Result • 88% Confident or Very Confident • 84% Either Wrote or Verbalized Action & Result & Expressed Confidence
    19. 19. Completing the Assessment Cycle Increased quality control immediately Maintain quality control Compare sub-groups, i.e. int’l to native speakers Measure change in outcomes Will continue to measure outcomes
    20. 20. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS Michelle Blackburn
    21. 21. Division of Recreational Sports Student Learning Outcomes 2013-2014 Highlights April 17, 2014
    22. 22. Climbing & Challenge Education
    23. 23. Climbing & Challenge Education 23 Skill Development  Personal Belief & Confidence  Community Engagement Creative Thinking  Stress Management  Goal Achievement  Personal Fitness Has climbing enabled you to grow? “I mean physically, I definitely have. And socially I guess. This is my first year in the US so I know nothing about foreigners and domestic people here – so it’s kind of like a barrier breaker for me to get to know Americans. Because there’s no limitations in bouldering, because anyone can join. It’s like a good way to meet a diversity of people.” “I come here and whatever I’ve got going on – you know, school work, ‘work’ work, searching for jobs, all these stresses, social problems, whatever it may be, I come to the climbing wall and it’s just like “oh, all of my friends are hanging out, we’re having fun, smiling so like even just psychologically, it’s like a vacation. It’s my favorite part of the day.”
    24. 24. Climbing & Challenge Education 24 Has climbing taught you anything about yourself? “I’m so addicted to this sport. I enjoy the way that my body feels when I climb. I think I get more control. I feel just like I’m building – if we say that the body is the asylum of your soul – I think I’m perfecting and making the asylum better.” “Yeah, probably more subtly than I can articulate, but definitely it’s taught me to always continue to challenge myself and push myself and, you know, discipline – if you want to be a better climber you have to climb three of four days a week, you can’t climb once a week” Skill Development  Personal Belief & Confidence  Community Engagement Creative Thinking  Stress Management  Goal Achievement  Personal Fitness
    25. 25. Intramural Sports
    26. 26. Intramural Sports 26 Leadership  Teamwork  Customer Service  Decision Making Outcome Details • Audience: Intramural Sports Supervisor • Development Practice: Training Exercises, Staff Meetings & Work Experiences • Assessment: Journaling & Performance Evaluation Results (Spring ‘13-Fall ‘13) • Leadership 2.42 to 2.51 - .09 • Decision Making 2.51 to 2.54 - .03 • Customer Service 2.71 to 2.78 - .07 *out of 4.0 scale, 40+ staff
    27. 27. Intramural Sports 27 Leadership  Teamwork  Customer Service  Decision Making A hiring supervisor asked: How will your experience as an Intramural Supervisor help you as a first year teacher? “I told him of my experience working with the Head Supervisor team and related it to what I would be able to bring to a grade level team in the school system. I told him about the management skills that I gained to be able to effectively manage the students in my classroom. I told him about how I built my problem solving and decision making skills in tough situations. I told him how I learned to self-evaluate my own skills to continually better myself as an employee. …I learned just as much from being a supervisor as I did from my education classes.”
    28. 28. AIR FORCE ROTC Captain Nivien Sathasivam
    29. 29. • Air Force ROTC Overview • Basic Four Year Program • SLO Specifics • Questions Overview
    30. 30. Air Force ROTC Overview Inspire, develop, and commission Purdue University cadets as United States Air Force officers who are ready to meet our Nation’s national security challenges What programs produce Air Force officers today? What is the Mission of Air Force ROTC DET 220? SOURCE NUMBER OF AF OFFICERS – Officer Training School – Approx. 10% or ~300/yr – Air Force Academy – Approx. 27% or ~800/yr – Air Force ROTC – Approx. 63% or ~1700/yr
    31. 31. 25-35 cadets 30-50 cadets 4- Year Overview Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior GMC – AS 100 GMC – AS 200 POC – AS 300 POC – AS 400 Lecture Class 1 Credit Lecture Class 1 Credit Lecture Class 3 Credits Lecture Class 3 Credits LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit Air Force Field Training 60-70 cadets 20-35 cadets Total of 32 credit hours of classes over 4 years
    32. 32. First 2 Years • AFROTC Academic Class (1 hour/week) • Freshmen learn - Intro to the Military • Sophomores learn - History of Aviation and USAF •Introduces AF briefings (public speaking) and AF writing with multiple assignments •Multiple exams covering associated material from class • Most Purdue academic school departments grant general elective credit for these AFROTC courses • AFROTC Leadership Lab. (2 hours/week) • You will undergo leadership training which includes military drill (marching), physical fitness, group leadership projects, briefings, etc. •Physical Fitness (3 hours/week) GMC – AS 200 Lecture Class 1 Credit Lecture Class 1 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit Freshman Sophomore GMC – AS 100
    33. 33. Summer Field Training • Field Training : Leadership Evaluation Under Stress • 3-week program over summer break at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama and Camp Shelby, Mississippi • Enhanced Military Training • Drill and Ceremony • Physical Fitness • Small Arms Training • Deployment Exercise • Return to leadership position within the Cadet Wing
    34. 34. Last 2 Years POC – AS 400 Lecture Class 3 Credit Lecture Class 3 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit Junior Senior POC – AS 300 •AFROTC Academic Class (2.5 hours/week) • Juniors learn - Leadership and Management • Seniors learn - National Security Policy and Air Force Doctrine •Case studies used to examine AF leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical applications •Extended AF briefings and AF research papers •Multiple exams covering associated material from class • AFROTC Leadership Lab. (2 hours/week) • You will plan, setup, and execute Leadership Lab. Your role is to teach and lead the GMC. • Wear your uniform to all classes on this day • Physical Fitness (3 hours/week)
    35. 35. Domain 3: Career Gold Silver Bronze Earn commission through AFROTC Complete Field Training Successfully complete 1 year of AFROTC Attend AFROTC Career Day Attend AFROTC Career Day Attend AFROTC Career Day Domain 6: Interpersonal Skills Gold Silver Bronze Earn commission through AFROTC Complete Field Training Successfully complete GMC portion of AFROTC Domain 7: Knowledge Gold Silver Bronze Earn commission through AFROTC Complete Field Training Successfully complete 1 year of AFROTC Domain 8: Leadership Gold Silver Bronze Earn commission through AFROTC Serve in one leadership position as POC Complete Field Training Domain 9: Responsibility Gold Silver Bronze Earn commission through AFROTC Complete Field Training Successfully complete 1 year of AFROTC Domain 10: Wellness Gold Silver Bronze Earn commission through AFROTC Complete Field Training Pass LLAB and earn a "B" or above in PES 114 Pass LLAB and earn a "B" or above in PES 114 SLO Domain Rubric
    36. 36. After Air Force ROTC POC – AS 400 Lecture Class 3 Credit Lecture Class 3 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit Junior POC – AS 300 Senior GMC – AS 200 Lecture Class 1 Credit Lecture Class 1 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit LLAB 1 Credit PT 1 Credit Freshman Sophomore GMC – AS 100 Air Force Field Training Graduate & Commission Receive Purdue degree & be commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force
    37. 37. Questions?
    38. 38. ARMY ROTC Captain Ralph Merrill
    39. 39. 40
    40. 40. 41 Overview  Learning Outcome Domains  Mapping of Curriculum to Army ROTC  Additional Programs/Opportunities within Army ROTC  Challenges  Questions?? MS II Cadets receiving Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Training during Lab at Horticulture Park
    41. 41. 42 Learning Outcome Domains PRIMARY  Career  Interpersonal Skills  Knowledge  Leadership  Responsibility CONSIDERABLE  Community  Globalism & Diversity  Wellness Boiler Battalion cadets providing assistance to a man about to receive treatment in a Mobile Treatment Facility during the MFRI Stand-Down, 2013
    42. 42. 43 Mapping of Curriculum Learning Domains Career Interpersonal Skills Knowledge Leadership Responsibility Values & Ethics X X Personal Development X X X X Leadership X X X X Tactics & Techniques X X X X Officership X X X X Cadet Practical Field Training X X X Volunteer Opportunities X X X There has recently been a curriculum shift within the Army ROTC program nationwide is now focusing on a Student-Centered approach to learning vs. Teacher-Centered learning styles. This shift in student-based learning has provided the opportunities for the student, to diversify their experiences within the classroom, as well as outside of the classroom.
    43. 43. 44 Additional Opportunities for Assessment  Clubs  Ranger  Pathfinder (Cross Fit)  Rifle/Pistol  Sisters in Arms  Community Service Projects  MFRI Veterans Stand-down  Veteran’s home  Cadet Practical Field Training (CPFT)  Leaders Training Course (LTC)  Leaders development and assessment course (LDAC)  Cultural understanding and language proficiency (CULP) * Community Global Diversity & Wellness
    44. 44. 45 Challenges  Opportunities for assessment very expansive: In-class vs. Out of class  Quantifiable means of measurement for “outside the classroom” learning opportunities  Additional schooling opportunities (Airborne, Air Assault etc.) are training opportunities that are assessed to a “GO/NO-GO” standard.
    45. 45. 46 Questions?
    46. 46. NAVY ROTC Lieutenant Megan May
    47. 47. • Lieutenant May gave an oral presentation on how SLOs relate to the day to day operations of the Navy ROTC program.
    48. 48. SPAN PLAN ADULT STUDENT SERVICES Dorothy Hughes
    49. 49. Dorothy gave an oral presentation. The full text of her presentation can be found by clicking on this link. The following slides summarize her presentation. Span Plan
    50. 50. Span Plan Tutors “A side effect of the limited time I have had to spend on learning outcomes is, I have come to think about some programs and services differently, including, learning outcomes for the Span Plan tutors I hire every semester.” Span Plan
    51. 51. Survey of Span Plan Tutors  Dorothy surveyed Span Plan tutors regarding their confidence in their tutoring skills at the beginning of, and the end of the semester. Of the 13 respondents:  5 reported no change in confidence over the semester  7 reported an increase in confidence  1 reported a decrease in confidence Span Plan
    52. 52. More Results  Dorothy also asked the tutors the following questions about their performance as tutors and their working relationship with tutees.  Did you seek feedback about your performance from your students?  While tutoring your students, did you solicited feedback about your working relationship?  All those who sought feedback about their performance and the working relationship made adjustments in their tutoring based on the feedback. Span Plan
    53. 53. Even More Results  Dorothy also asked, “What is one thing you learned about yourself as a result of working as a Span Plan tutor?”  Here are some of their responses:  I am able to teach and help others even though I am still a student  Tutoring math involves more than just being able to do the math.  It was such a joy when the students were engaged in learning.  I learn about something better when I teach it back  I learned that I really love working with students that are eager to learn. Span Plan
    54. 54. Closing the Loop  Dorothy used the data she collected from her survey to improve the orientation during the tutor hiring process by taking the following actions:  Emphasizing the value of communication and feedback collection between tutor and student.  Emphasize relationship building dialogue with the students.  Emphasize the personal and professional value of tutoring; the value of working as a tutor is not limited to the biweekly deposits in the tutor’s bank account.  Encourage supervision with Span Plan staff. Span Plan
    55. 55. I have been the director Span Plan Adult Student Services for six or seven years. Those of who know me also know that one of my personal and professional philosophies is to strive for continuous improvement. Being mindful of this philosophy keeps me attentive to evaluating Span Plan’s programs and services. This involves routinely sending evaluation surveys at the end of every program and making improvements based on the feedback I collect. For the most part, every program and service assessed hit above or near the goal set for learning outcomes. Being involved in the learning outcomes assessment process has been a challenge. With Margaret Wu’s patient assistance, I have made some headway with wording survey questions in ways that evaluate learning outcomes. A side effect of the limited time I have had to spend on learning outcomes, I have come to think about some programs and services differently, including, learning outcomes for the Span Plan tutors I hire every semester. In reviewing the tutor survey results I found several interesting outcomes: In assessing and comparing the tutors’ confidence in their tutoring skills at the beginning of and the end of the semester, of the 13 respondents:  5 reported no change in confidence over the semester  7 reported an increase in confidence  1 reported a decrease in confidence (I wish I knew which tutor this is so we could have a conversation about it) In assessing the feedback loop between tutor and student, I asked separate questions about their performance as a tutor and their working relationship:  First question to the tutor: Did you seek feedback about your performance from your students? If yes, did you improve performance based on the feedback? Of the 10 who solicited feedback, all reported they improved their tutoring performance based on the students’ feedback.  Second question for the tutor: While tutoring your students, did you solicited feedback about your working relationship? Of the nine who did solicit feedback about their working relationship, all made adjustments to their working relationships based on the feedback received.  The most rewarding question I asked was: What is one thing you learned about yourself as a result of working as a Span Plan tutor? Some of my favorite responses are:  I learned to find ways to solve problems  I am a very patient person  I know how to help others understand  I am able to teach and help others even though I am still a student  I know enough about the subject matter to help others learn it  I would consider teaching professionally  Tutoring math involves more than just being able to do the math.  You have to understand how the other person thinks  I learned that I really love working with students that are eager to learn.  It was such a joy when the students were engaged in learning.  I learn about something better when I teach it back How can I apply the above feedback to the tutoring program? What is the message I took from this feedback that I can implement in my continuous improvement plan as Span Plan hires future tutors? I plan to improve the orientation during the hiring process by:  Emphasizing the value of communication/feedback collection between tutor and student.  Emphasize relationship building dialogue with the students.  Emphasize the personal and professional value of tutoring  Encourage supervision with Span Plan staff.  Emphasize that the value of working as a tutor is not limited to the biweekly deposits in the tutor’s bank account. Dorothy Hughes, Span Plan – Full Text
    56. 56. HORIZONS Rosa Villarreal
    57. 57. Horizons Study Abroad San Jose, Costa Rica
    58. 58. • 100% of HORIZONS students participating in the service learning abroad program will increase his or her ability to appreciate others from different backgrounds he or she encounters as evidenced by fulfilling course requirements and the pre and post evaluation. • 100% of HORIZONS students participating in the service learning abroad program will increase his or her confidence in functioning effectively in a new environment or system as evidenced by successfully completing their program in a homestay, fulfilling course requirements and the pre and post evaluation. • 100% of HORIZONS students participating in the service learning abroad program will increase his or her ability and confidence to demonstrate a level of facility communicating with people from other ethnic and/or linguistic backgrounds as evidenced by successfully completing their program in a homestay, fulfilling course requirements and the pre and post evaluation. • 100% of students participating in the service-learning course will complete 40 hours of service to a local non-profit over two weeks and will demonstrate an understanding of agency culture by abiding by agency policies regarding professional dress, behavior, language, and other relevant codes of conduct as evidenced by fulfilling course requirements, the site supervisor evaluations, and the pre and post evaluation.
    59. 59. Identifying Participants’ Confidence levels through Pre and Post Testing Goal setting Navigation through an unfamiliar environment Cross cultural communication Ability to solve problems Ability to solve conflict Knowledge of your discipline in a global context Ability to get a job in your field of study Ability to perform your job in a global context Ability to make a difference in the world Ability to lead others Achieving your life’s aspirations Taking action to decrease other people’s suffering
    60. 60. STUDENT ASSISTANCE CENTER Sara Carvell
    61. 61. What’s on the Menu? First Course: Domain 1 (Wellness) Second Course: Domain 4 (Knowledge) Third Course: Domain 7 (Interpersonal Skills) Fourth Course: Domain 8 (Responsibility) For each course, you have 4-6 options. This is representative of the wide range of services that the SAC offers to our campus community!
    62. 62. What does that look like? Domain8:Responsibility(EthicalReasoning,Self-EfficacyandSelf-Advocacy) Acceptsresponsibility,demonstratesprofessionalism,meetscommitments,reflectsonconsequencesofone’sactions, recognizesstrengthsandweaknesses,developsethicalreasoning. AsaresultofreceivingservicesfromSAC,studentswill useself-advocacyskillsasdemonstratedbyinterview. AsaresultofreceivingservicesfromSAC,studentswillbeabletoidentifyatleastonesituationinwhichtheyused skillsorcopingmechanismlearnedduringsessionasdemonstratedbyinterview. AsaresultofreceivingservicesfromSAC,studentswilldemonstrateeffectivetimemanagementskillsas demonstratedbyinterview. AsaresultofreceivingservicesfromSAC,studentswillbeabletoidentifyatleast threepersonalstrengthsas demonstratedbyinterview. AsaresultofutilizingtheEmergencyLoanprogram,80%ofstudentparticipantswilldemonstratesocial responsibilitybypayingtheirloansbackwithin30daysasevidencedbyEmergencyLoanrecords. AsaresultofparticipatingintheFinancialResponsibilityModule,studentswillincreasetheirknowledgeof appropriatebudgetingandspendingpracticesasdemonstratedbycomparisonofpre-andpost-moduleassessment scores.
    63. 63. How do you choose what you want? In order to meet the goal, a student must meet two (or more) learning outcomes across two different domains. In other words…the SAC is an all-you-care-to-eat buffet… 0 A student can reach all 20 learning outcomes through receiving services 0 A student may have a few specific concerns, address those appropriately, and still meet the goal.
    64. 64. You say you heard our menu changed? You’re right! Our scope of practice changed, however, our learning outcomes still fit. How can that be?! We are still helping students learn skills that will make them successful both inside and outside the classroom.
    65. 65. What does your new menu look like? Because we’re not seeing as many students on a weekly basis (recurring appointments), we’ve been able to add some exciting new services. 0 Personal Responsibility Program 0 QPR Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training 0 Outreach to Campus Partners 0 Additional Walk-in Coverage for Students 0 Title IX Hearing Advocate 0 Financial Responsibility Module Stay tuned for more exciting things to come!
    66. 66. DIVERSITY & INCLUSION Carol Ben-Davies
    67. 67. Recruitment, Retention and YOU! Carol E. Ben-Davies Assistant Dean of Students Diversity & Inclusion Boiler Tracks
    68. 68. STRATEGIC OVERVIEW Purpose •Adopted from a program at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill •Fall 2011 – Inaugural year at Purdue What is Boiler Tracks ? History •It’s about YOU leaving a legacy at Purdue by increasing our underrepresented student population and by helping others recognize the value of a Purdue education. •It’s about YOU positioning yourself as a mentor and gaining leadership and presentation skills. •It’s about YOU meeting current and future Boilermakers and share your enthusiasm for your university.
    69. 69. STRATEGIC OVERVIEWBoiler Tracks Student Learning Outcomes SLO Definition Program Name Tool #1 As a result of participating in the Boiler Tracks training sessions, 90% of students will be able to identify and explain the value of at least five University resources dedicated to assisting underrepresented students in earning a degree from Purdue University Boiler Tracks Rubric As a result of participating in the Boiler Tracks training sessions, 90% of students will improved their presentation skills Boiler Tracks Rubric VPSA Domains: Boiler Pride Globalism & Diversity Leadership
    70. 70. STRATEGIC OVERVIEWProcess Partners: Ja’Niah Downing Senior Assistant Director Office of Admissions Lygia Vernon Coordinator of Civic Engagement Student Activities and Organizations Civic Engagement & Leadership Development • Pre-test and Post-test given to students during their training and a University Student Leader Survey sent to them using an online survey tool to complete after their high school visit. • The surveys focused on the leaders and high school students’ perceptions regarding the value of the program, their satisfaction with the program, and their perceived effectiveness of the program.
    71. 71. STRATEGIC OVERVIEW • 100 percent of the members indicated that they grew in their presentation skills as a result of participating in the Fall Break High School Visits. Majority of them indicated that they grew significantly, while a few of them indicated that they grew slightly. • Majority of the university leaders indicated that they knew five Purdue resources at the end of the training. Majority of the leaders felt that they were able to communicate the resources at Purdue and their value to the high school students • Majority of university leaders expressed that they were prepared for their high school visit after training, and they noted after their high school visit that they had enough knowledge that they received about Purdue during training to use for their high school visit during their visit. Results
    72. 72. STRATEGIC OVERVIEW • Choosing a college is hard enough but being a minority makes it even harder. I enjoy being able to show incoming students that they don't have to be afraid to come to Purdue. That even being a minority we can still come together, sort of like a family away from home, and make a difference. • I believe that it is important to be that extra resource or possibly the only resource, that helps guide incoming students to get a slight glimpse of what college life is all about and how to make it to the finish line, though it may be complex at times, there are always those people and resources who are there to help whenever you need it! Its a support system. • Boiler Tracks has allowed me to share all of my experiences as a college student as well as all of the opportunities I've had since making Purdue my home. Every time I talk with an admitted or prospective student about Purdue, all I feel is pride. I am proud knowing that something I say may be the deciding factor on them becoming a Boilermaker. Comments from Boiler Track members
    73. 73. THANK YOU MANY TRACKS, BUT ONLY ONE LEADS TO PURDUE! Carol Ben-Davies cbd@purdue.edu 494-9028
    74. 74. OFFICE OF STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Jeff Stefancic
    75. 75. Using a CAS Self Assessment to Improve and Plan for the Future
    76. 76.  Council for theAdvancement of Standards in Higher Education  43 sets of functional area standards  Mission is to promote the improvement of programs and services to enhance the quality of student learning and development  Developed by a consortium of professional associations
    77. 77.  Last updated and revised inAugust 2012  Developed in conjunction with the Association for Student Conduct Administration (ASCA)  Grounded in the belief that standards of conduct for the basis for behavioral expectations in the academic community and that the enforcement of conduct standards is an educational endeavor.
    78. 78.  Mission  Program  Organization and Leadership  Human Resources  Ethics  Internal and External Relationships  Technology  Assessment and Evaluation
    79. 79.  Internal ReviewTeam Selected  Individuals/Offices that OSRR currently partners with  Inclusive of Faculty, Staff, and Students  OSRR staff served as “subject matter experts” to assist and consult with review teams.  Kick Off Meeting  OSRR staff andVPSA staff met with team to review process and timeline
    80. 80.  Review teams divided into working groups  Review teams given approximately two weeks to meet with each other and “subject matter expert” and then enter ratings/evaluations  VPSA staff collated results and provided feedback to OSRR leadership and staff
    81. 81.  Strongest Areas:  Organization and Leadership  Program  Human Resources  AreasTargeted for Improvement  Assessment and Evaluation  Stated Ethics Statement  Facilities and Equipment
    82. 82.  Sharing what we learned internally  External Review  Allocating time and staff resources to address improvement areas  Springboard for strategic planning process  Utilize assessment to help tell our stories
    83. 83. STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES Leslie Charters
    84. 84. LEARNING OUTCOMES  Knowledge: Developing new knowledge about the law, including a student’s rights and responsibilities; teaching students how to be proactive in preventing legal issues from occurring  Preparation: Preparing students for future court proceedings and responding to various legal conflicts  Wellness: Making informed, healthy choices about alcohol and drug use
    85. 85. STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES EVALUATION SURVEY PURDUE UNIVERSITY Following my appointment with Purdue Student Legal Services and/or presentation by Student Legal Services: Please circle the appropriate number: . Strongly Disagree Disagree Indifferent Agree Strongly Agree N/A 1 I have a better understanding of the Legal System and/or how the law applies to my issue. 1 2 3 4 5 0 2 I feel that I have a better understanding of the various options available to address my problem/issue. 1 2 3 4 5 0 3 I feel that I have a better understanding of how to address and/or avoid similar situations in the future. 1 2 3 4 5 0 4 I feel that I have a better understanding of the various resources available through Student Legal Services, the University, Tippecanoe County, etc. 1 2 3 4 5 0 5 Before meeting with Student Legal Services, my legal issue was a source of worry or stress. 1 2 3 4 5 0 6 Student Legal Services reduced my level of stress or anxiety over my legal issue. 1 2 3 4 5 0 7 The service/presentation received from Student Legal Services made (or will make) it easier to pursue my education at Purdue University. For example: did we assist with traveling abroad, your housing issues, your criminal records and future job search, etc? 1 2 3 4 5 0 8 Comments:
    86. 86. FIRST YEAR DATA:  93.93% of all responses to questions are Agree & Strongly Agree  334 student meetings 9/3/13 to 4/11/14  Q1 (knowledge): 98.78% Agree & Strongly Agree  Q2 (preparation): 97.97% Agree & Strongly Agree  Q6 (wellness): 87.14% Agree & Strongly Agree  Q7 (*retention): 89.40% Agree & Strongly Agree
    87. 87. CIVIC ENGAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT Mel Gruver
    88. 88. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
    89. 89. GENERAL LEARNING OUTCOMES Students who participate in the programs, courses and initiatives offered by Civic Engagement & Leadership Development will… • identify and describe multiple leadership techniques, theories and approaches to social change. • articulate a coherent personal philosophy of leadership, service and social justice. • demonstrate how one's social identities intersect with the practice of leadership and civic engagement behaviors. • understand critical societal issues and community needs in the context of community assets. • describe the connection between their academic discipline and vocation to the leadership process and social responsibility • recognize and critique the impact of socio-political systems on communities, people and society. • utilize reflection as a tool for meaning-making, to gain a deeper understanding of self and to inform deliberate public action. • identify a fundamental social issue of interest and articulate personal commitment to enacting positive change in the area. • create and implement an action plan to utilize personal strengths in facilitating positive change in campus, local and global communities.
    90. 90. GUIDING DOCUMENTS Council for the Advancement of Standards Leadership Identity Development Model Active Citizens Continuum American Association of Colleges & Universities: Civic Engagement Rubric Kolb's Experiential Learning Model A Crucible Moment: College Learning & Democracy's Future High-Impact Educational Practices (Kuh, 2008)
    91. 91. POINTS OF PRIDE Learning Outcomes for Each Program & Initiative Student Input on Outcome Design Individualized Reports Community Partners as Co-Educators Community Impacts Outcomes
    92. 92. STUDENT ACTIVITIES & ORGANIZATIONS Martia Brawner-King
    93. 93. Student Organization Workshops 97 Outcome 1: As a result of participating in the student organization president workshop, 95% of students will know their responsibilities as a student organizations president by being able to describe how to register their student organization Outcome 2: As a result of participating in the student organization president workshop, 95% of students will know their responsibilities as a student organizations president by knowing the steps for planning an event. 6% 16% 24%35% 19% 0% 0% 1% 33% 66% 1. Strongly disagree 2. Disagree 3. Maybe 4. Agree 5. Strongly agree 7% 18% 23%34% 18% 0% 1% 1% 31% 67% *549 Participants answered questions associated with this learning outcome. *553 Participants answered questions associated with this learning outcome.
    94. 94. FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES, & COOPERATIVE LIVING Brandon Cutler & Chris DeEulius
    95. 95. • Brandon and Chris gave an oral presentation on student learning outcomes have shaped FSCL programming. • A handout from their presentation appears on the next slide.
    96. 96. Fraternity, Sorority and Cooperative Life: Using Student Learning Outcomes to Shape Programming FSCL Outcomes Student Learning Outcomes Program Outcomes Fraternity, Sorority and Cooperative Life Outcomes: - Learn necessary skills to succeed academically - Be engaged locally and globally - Develop leadership skills - Develop and implement organizational change Program Outcomes: - Develop relationships - Campus resources - Appreciate differences between individuals - Health and safety education - Positional leadership duties - Developmental leadership Student Learning Outcomes: - Boiler Pride - Community - Career - Globalism & Diversity - Interpersonal Skills - Knowledge - Leadership - Responsibility - Wellness Program Development: - Student collaboration - Start with “Why?” - Learning outcomes - See what has been done - Develop curriculum - Develop assessment - Implement program - Assess - Improve based on assessment to increase effectiveness
    97. 97. STUDENT WELLNESS OFFICE Michelle Singleton & Chico Jensen
    98. 98. Student Wellness Office: Student Learning Outcomes Michelle Singleton Nutrition Education Coordinator Chico Jensen Sexual Health & Sexual Violence Risk Reduction Coordinator
    99. 99. What is Self-Efficacy?
    100. 100. Nutrition 104 In 25% of presentations: 75% of student participants in nutrition education presentations will report a 10% increase in their ability to make healthier food choices, as the result of a presentation. 75% of student participants in nutrition education presentations will report a 10% increase in their ability to develop a healthy body image, as the result of a presentation.
    101. 101. Nutrition Data 105 As of April 11, 36 nutrition education programs were completed. 55% included a measure of self-efficacy. 87% of student participants reported a 10% increase in their ability to make healthier food choices, as the result of a presentation. 79% of student participants reported a 10% increase in their ability to develop a healthy body image, as the result of a presentation.
    102. 102. Sexual Health 106 In 25% of presentations: 75% of student participants in sexual health education presentations will report a 10% increase in their ability to correctly and consistently follow safer sex practices, as the result of a presentation.
    103. 103. Student Success Stories
    104. 104. VPSA ASSESSMENT Dan Whiteley & Margaret Wu
    105. 105. Tracking Made Easier TracDat System Roll Out • TracDat will be the official source data for assessment reporting campus- wide. • Centralized data collection and storage. • Show trending, as well as provide detail on specific measures. • All types of document import to supply supporting documentation. • Customizable fields and flexible reporting. • Standard canned reports and ad hoc reporting capability. • Mapping to the Purdue embedded learning outcomes and the AfterClass Experience. • Alignment with the core curriculum embedded learning outcomes will allow faculty to see what co-curricular programs have met the embedded learning outcomes requirement.
    106. 106. Co-Curricular Nomination Process • 19 programs have already been accepted • Our goal is to work with any interested parties to complete the process.
    107. 107. Student Learning Outcomes • Work together to develop, assess, and act on student learning outcomes • Please give us your feedback!

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